L'Académie nouvelle

Vous souhaitez réagir à ce message ? Créez un compte en quelques clics ou connectez-vous pour continuer.
L'Académie nouvelle

Forum d'archivage politique et scientifique

-40%
Le deal à ne pas rater :
-40% sur Logitech Z207 Système de hauts-parleurs Bluetooth pour PC ...
30 € 50 €
Voir le deal

    David Copp, Varieties of Moral Naturalism

    Johnathan R. Razorback
    Johnathan R. Razorback
    Admin

    Messages : 7743
    Date d'inscription : 12/08/2013
    Localisation : France

    David Copp, Varieties of Moral Naturalism Empty David Copp, Varieties of Moral Naturalism

    Message par Johnathan R. Razorback le Sam 21 Avr - 19:56

    https://philosophy.ucdavis.edu/people/dcopp

    https://philpapers.org/rec/COPVOM

    "We all have moral beliefs. We take it to be true, for example, that torture is
    wrong, that compassion is a virtue, that there is a right to freedom of expression.
    These beliefs are normative or evaluative; they concern what we ought or ought
    not to do, or what is valuable or worthy of our choosing, or what we must ensure,
    regardless of what we ourselves value. If eating meat is wrong, for example, its
    wrongness does not depend on what we enjoy eating or on what we value in life.
    Yet its wrongness means that we must avoid eating meat.
    There is a puzzle here. For our moral beliefs concern what we ought to do
    or what we ought to choose or value, not what we are actually inclined to do or
    how we actually act or choose or what we actually value. The question is, what in
    the world could make such beliefs be true? There does not seem to be room in the
    natural world for facts of the kinds that would need to exist in order to make our
    moral beliefs be true. Say that the natural world consists of everything we could
    learn about through the senses, including what we can learn of by means of science
    as well as what we can learn in less sophisticated ways. Science is very powerful. But
    it does not seem to have the power to discover normative facts, facts about how
    things ought or ought not to be. It does not seem to have the power to reveal that
    torture is wrong or that compassion is a virtue. It does not seem to have the power
    to reveal whether eating meat is wrong. Indeed, it would seem misguided to propose
    that science could settle whether eating meat is wrong, or that to decide whether
    eating meat is wrong, what we need to do is to carry out ever more sophisticated
    empirical enquiries. In short, there does not seem to be room for normative facts
    in the picture we have of the natural world. If there are normative facts, it seems
    they could not be natural facts.
    A second puzzle is related to the first one, but it is perhaps more subtle. The
    first puzzle is whether a moral fact could be a natural fact. It is the problem of explaining
    what could possibly make a moral belief be true. The second puzzle begins
    with the idea that our moral beliefs are normative and that a moral fact would be
    a normative fact. That is, our moral beliefs have an important characteristic, the
    property of being normative. It is because moral beliefs are normative that it seems
    impossible that any natural fact could make such a belief be true. A fact that would
    make a moral belief be true would itself have to be normative, and the picture we
    have of the natural world seems to leave no room for normative facts. But this
    leads us to a second puzzle. The question is, what is it for a belief or a fact to be
    normative? The first puzzle is, in effect, that it seems impossible for any natural fact
    to be normative, so it seems impossible for any natural fact to make a normative
    belief be true. The second puzzle is the problem of explaining normativity. If the
    normativity of moral beliefs and facts is not a naturalistic feature that they have,
    then what kind of feature is it, and what does it consist in?
    Moral Naturalism
    Despite the intuitive force of these two puzzles, a moral naturalist maintains
    that moral facts are natural facts and that their normativity is a natural feature that
    they have. Moral naturalism is accordingly an optimistic position. It sees moral truth
    and normativity as natural phenomena.
    To be clear about just how optimistic moral naturalism is, let me set out the
    central doctrines that distinguish it from its competitors. To begin, moral naturalism
    is a kind of moral realism, so it must be distinguished from all forms of moral
    anti-realism. There are four central doctrines that are shared by moral realists, as
    I understand the position, and that distinguish moral realism from anti-realism.
    Moral naturalism must also be distinguished of course from anti-naturalistic forms
    of moral realism. There is a fifth doctrine that is shared by moral naturalists and
    that distinguishes moral naturalism from non-naturalism.
    First, a moral realist holds, as I shall say, that there are moral properties.
    The actions that are wrong have something in common in virtue of which they are
    wrong. They are similar in this respect. What they have in common is of course that
    they are all wrong; that is, they all have the property of being wrong. The states of
    character that are virtuous have something in common in virtue of which they are
    similar; what they have in common is the property of being a virtue. And so on.
    That is, there is such a thing as moral wrongness and there is such a thing as the
    property of being a moral virtue. There are moral properties.
    To be sure, there are ancient philosophical debates about such similarities and
    about how to understand them. I say that there are moral properties, and I would
    say as well that there are many natural properties, such as the property of being
    deciduous, the property of being a rubber tree, the property of being a hallucinogen.
    But for present purposes I do not take any particular position in the metaphysical
    debates about the nature of so-called properties. There is no need for a moral realist
    to take any particular position in these debates. She needs to insist merely that
    moral properties have the same basic metaphysical nature as any other properties,
    whatever that nature might be.
    Second, a moral realist insists that some moral properties are instantiated. This
    is just to say that some kinds of action are wrong and that some traits of character
    are virtues. People have done wrong things and they have done right things. Some
    people are good and some are vicious. The actual world includes persons, events,
    and states of affairs that have moral characteristics, such as that of being wrong or
    of being vicious or of being unjust. In short, there are moral facts.
    Third, moral predicates are used to ascribe moral properties. The predicate
    “wrong” is used to ascribe wrongness; the predicate “just” is used to ascribe justice.
    And so on. Our moral language is used to pick out respects in which things are morally
    similar and to describe things in terms of these similarities. Of course, a realist
    would not deny that there may well be moral subtleties that we have not yet understood.
    A moral realist would concede that people have been morally obtuse during
    various periods of history and she would readily concede that there has been moral
    progress and that there might well be moral progress in our future. This third point
    is simply that moral language does not work in any special way that distinguishes it
    fundamentally from ordinary descriptive language. Moral predicates ascribe moral
    properties just as ordinary descriptive predicates ascribe descriptive properties. The
    sentence, “Torture is wrong,” ascribes to torture a similarity to other wrong kinds of
    action just as the sentence, “Torture is widespread,” ascribes to torture a similarity
    to other kinds of action that are widespread.
    Fourth, moral assertions express moral beliefs. I began by saying that we have
    moral beliefs. We believe that certain kinds of action are wrong and we believe that
    certain traits of character are virtues. This fourth point is simply that moral assertions
    do not work in any special way that distinguishes them fundamentally from
    how ordinary assertions work. Ordinary assertions express ordinary beliefs. If I assert
    that torture is widespread, I express the ordinary belief that torture is widespread.
    And, the realist holds, if I assert that torture is wrong, I express another ordinary
    belief, the belief that torture is wrong. It is worth insisting on this since some moral
    philosophers hold that the states of mind we express in making moral assertions
    are not beliefs, or that they are metaphysically different in some crucial way from
    the states of mind expressed by ordinary nonmoral assertions. On this view, the assertions
    that torture is wrong and the assertion that torture is widespread express
    different kinds of states of mind. A moral realist denies this. She insists that moral
    beliefs have the same basic metaphysical nature as other beliefs.
    Fifth, and finally, moral naturalism adds that the moral properties are natural
    properties. That is, they have the same basic metaphysical and epistemological status
    as ordinary natural properties such as redness, deciduous-ness, and the property of
    being a railroad car. There is room to debate exactly what this comes to, of course.
    Elsewhere I have contributed to the debate (Copp, 2007, ch. 1). For present purposes,
    the important point is simply that, in committing herself to this fifth doctrine,
    the moral naturalist commits herself to addressing the two puzzles I set out in the
    preceding section. She commits herself to explaining how it could be that moral
    facts are facts of the same kind as ordinary natural facts and she commits herself
    to explaining, in naturalistic terms, what the normativity of such facts consists in.
    Given the intuitive force of the two puzzles, one might naturally wonder why
    anyone would take such an audacious view. Do we have any reason to be optimistic
    that moral naturalism might be true?
    Why Naturalism?
    Some moral naturalists are motivated by metaphysical and epistemological
    concerns. The idea that an ordinary human being or an ordinary event or action
    might have a property that is “non-natural” can seem puzzling and spooky. The very
    idea that there are such properties can seem extravagant. Moreover, it can seem
    puzzling how we could know that any such property is instantiated. I am assuming
    here that if our basic knowledge about the nature of a property and about its
    instantiation is empirical, then it is a natural property. So if moral properties are
    non-natural, our knowledge as to which actions are right or wrong and as to which
    traits of character are virtuous and which vicious would have to be acquired in
    some non-empirical way. It is not clear how this could be. For reasons of this kind,
    many philosophers hold that we should avoid burdening our metaphysics with the
    hypothesis that there are any non-natural properties unless there is no alternative.
    There is the further point that the hypothesis that moral properties are nonnatural
    does nothing to explain their nature and nothing to explain what their
    normativity might consist in. So it leaves the two puzzles in place, understood now
    as puzzles about how there could be moral properties and not merely as puzzles
    about how moral properties could be natural properties. Naturalism might seem
    to offer at least a strategy for explaining the nature of moral properties and their
    normativity, the strategy of somehow assimilating moral properties to ordinary
    properties of familiar kinds. Hence, if we accept the four doctrines of moral realism,
    it can seem that we have explanatory reasons to try to develop a satisfactory
    version of moral naturalism as well as metaphysical and epistemological reasons.
    One might suggest that we should instead abandon moral realism. But I want
    to resist going in this direction since we do have moral beliefs – we take there to be
    moral truths – and these beliefs give every appearance of being ordinary beliefs about
    ordinary states of affairs. Moreover, moral states of affairs seem to be part of our
    ordinary experience. For instance, it is part of our ordinary experience that there are
    bad people as well as good people, that people commit horrible wrongs and that,
    in addition, from time to time, people do wonderfully praiseworthy things. We are
    aware of these facts in ordinary ways. We read about them in history, for instance.
    And sometimes we can understand and explain people’s actions on the basis of their
    moral character just as sometimes we can understand and explain people’s actions
    as responses to injustices.3 All of this is part of the natural world of our experience.
    For reasons of this kind, the naturalist is loath to abandon moral realism and loath
    to embrace the unhelpful idea that moral properties are non-natural.
    Varieties of Naturalism
    The challenge facing moral naturalism is to answer in some way the two
    central puzzles by explaining how moral facts can be part of the natural world of
    our experience and by explaining what their normativity can consist in, in a way
    that is compatible with their being natural facts. We can organize our examination
    of the kinds of strategies available to naturalists by looking in some detail at four
    main objections to moral naturalism. These objections can be seen as attempts to
    make the two puzzles more precise. The main varieties of moral naturalism can be
    seen in turn as arising from responses to the objections.
    The four main objections are the objection from the Is/Ought Gap or the Fact/
    Value Gap, the Open Question Argument, the Objection from Queerness, and the
    objection that naturalism cannot accommodate normativity. I will discuss them,
    briefly, in order.
    The Objection from the “Is/Ought Gap”
    or “Fact/Value Gap”
    The fundamental idea behind this objection is that there is a logical gap
    between non-normative claims about how things are in the world and normative
    claims about what ought to be. The idea is suggested by David Hume in a famous
    passage in the Treatise of Human Nature, III 1.1. Hume writes […]


    […]
    The issue we are addressing, however, is whether normative moral facts can
    be natural facts. The problem with the objection is that even if there is a logical
    gap between non-normative claims and normative moral claims, it does not follow
    that moral facts are not natural facts.
    The way to see this is to notice that there are similar gaps between kinds of
    natural claims. As Nicholas Sturgeon (2006) has pointed out, there is a similar gap
    between physical claims and biological claims (Sturgeon, 2006, p. 102-105). No

    matter what complex conjunction of purely physical propositions you might like to
    construct, no biological proposition follows. But it obviously does not follow from
    this that biological facts are not natural facts. One might even deny that it follows
    that biology cannot be reduced to physics. According to the moral naturalist, the is/
    ought gap is not relevantly different from this physical/biological gap. We understand
    the existence of the physical/biological gap as compatible with its being the case
    that physical and biological facts are simply different kinds of natural facts. Similarly,
    the naturalist holds, we should understand the gap between non-normative natural
    propositions and moral propositions as compatible with its being the case that
    non-normative natural facts and moral facts are simply two kinds of natural fact.
    The “Open Question Argument”
    This argument was first proposed by G.E. Moore in section 13 of Principia
    Ethica (Moore, 1993 [1903]). It is one of the most famous and influential arguments
    in twentieth century philosophy. To understand the form it takes, we need
    to understand that, for Moore, the fundamental issue in ethics is the nature of
    goodness. In section 5 of Principia, he says that ethics is “the general inquiry into
    what is good” and that its fundamental question is, What is good? Or better, we
    might say, his question is, What is goodness? Moore argues that it is not possible to
    provide a “definition” or “analysis” that gives the nature of the property goodness
    by specifying some property or complex of properties that goodness is identical
    to. As the Open Question argument purports to show, goodness is indefinable or
    unanalyzable.
    The argument is commonly construed, however, as an argument against moral
    naturalism. Understood in this way, the underlying idea is presumably that if goodness
    were a natural property, then it would be analyzable. For it would be possible
    to provide an analysis of it that showed it to be identical to some natural property
    or complex of natural properties. The argument can be represented as follows:
    (1) Suppose “good” denotes a natural property R
    (2) Then to be good is to be R. (Perhaps to be good is to be that which we
    desire to desire. Or perhaps to be good is to be pleasant.)
    (3) Therefore, the question “Is it good to be R?” is equivalent to “Is it R to
    be R?”
    (4) But the question “Is it good to be R?” is significant (and open) whereas
    the question, “Is it R to be R?” is not significant.
    (5) Therefore, the questions are not equivalent.
    (6) The conclusion expressed by (5) contradicts the conclusion expressed by (3).
    (7) Therefore, the supposition in (1) is false.
    Therefore, (Cool “Good” does not denote a natural property.
    This is the open question argument. When generalized, it might seem to show
    that moral naturalism cannot be true.
    The argument has been widely discussed over the past century and by now
    there are standard responses to it. I will discuss three lines of response.4
    First, as Nicholas Sturgeon (2006, p. 98-99) has pointed out, the argument
    seems to depend on the assumption that the term “goodness” does not denote a
    natural property. To be successful, the argument must show that goodness cannot
    be identical to any natural property. That is, the argument must go through no
    matter what term denoting a natural property is substituted for “R” in the above
    schematic representation of the argument. But of course a naturalist holds that
    goodness is itself a natural property. Hence, for a naturalist, the term “goodness”
    or the predicate “good” can be substituted for “R” in the argument. But with this
    substitution, the question “Is it good to be R?” just is the question “Is it good to
    be good?” And on this understanding, of course, premise (4) is obviously false.
    For on this understanding, the question “Is it good to be R?” and the question “Is
    it R to be R?” are one and the same question, namely the question, “Is it good to
    be good?” So it cannot be true that one of them is significant and open while the
    other is not. A naturalist can therefore deny premise (4).
    This response points the way to a Non-Reductive Naturalism of the sort that
    Sturgeon has proposed. Non-reductive naturalism maintains that the moral properties
    are natural properties but does not aim to defend any reductive analyses of the
    moral properties. According to reductive forms of naturalism, for each moral property
    M, there is some natural property N such that to be M is to be N, where “N” is an
    expression couched in wholly naturalistic terms, no predicate in which is normative
    and every predicate in which refers to some property that is independently taken
    to be a natural property. A naturalist who proposes a non-reductive theory must
    of course defend the proposition that the moral properties are natural properties,
    but she must do this without relying on any such reductive analyses.
    I turn now to the second response to the argument. It has often been noted
    that property identities can be non-transparent in the sense that it can be true that
    a property M is identical with a property N even if this is not obvious or transparent
    to those who are familiar with M and N and competent in identifying M and
    N. For example, the number 796 is identical to the difference between 12,231 and
    11,435 even though this is not immediately obvious. This claim entails a claim about
    property identity, for it entails that the property a collection can have of having 796
    members is identical to the property of having 12,231 less 11,435 members. Yet
    this equality is not obvious. Since this is not obvious, the question, “Is 796 equal
    to 12,231-11,435?” is significant and open. Of course the question “Is 796 equal
    to 796?” is trivial, but this does not undermine the fact that 796=12,231-11,435.
    Similarly the question, Does a set that has 796 members have 12,231 less 11,435
    members? is significant although the question, Does a set that has 796 members
    have 796 members? is trivial. But this does not undermine the fact that to have 796
    members is to have 12,231 less 11,435 members. The fact that the one question is
    significant while the other is trivial does not undermine the equality.
    This response shows that a naturalist can deny premise (3) in the argument,
    or perhaps the inference from (4) to (5). She can certainly deny that the argument
    supports (7) and the rejection of moral naturalism. This approach shows that there
    room for Analytic Reductive Naturalism. According to a view of this kind, it is possible
    to provide analytic reductive analyses of the moral properties, analyses that
    identify, for each moral property M, some natural property N that is identical to M,
    where the proposition that M is identical to N is analytic, or is a conceptual truth.
    The claim would be that even if it is analytic that M is identical to N, or even if
    this is a conceptual truth, it is not transparently so. The Open Question argument
    therefore does not go through.
    The third response to the argument begins from the point that property
    identities can be a posteriori. Consider, for example, the proposition that heat is
    mean molecular kinetic energy. This proposition is true yet it is not an analytic or
    conceptual truth. It is a posteriori in the sense that one cannot know it to be true
    without empirical evidence that gives one information beyond the information one
    must already have just as a matter of having the concept of heat. Saul Kripke and
    Hilary Putnam pointed out that reductive definitions in science need not be analytic
    or conceptual truths (Putnam, 1981, p. 205-211; Kripke, 1980). There is therefore
    room for a naturalist to hold that the true propositions that identify, for each moral
    property M, some natural property N that is identical to M, are a posteriori. But if
    the proposition that M is identical to N is a posteriori, then its truth is compatible
    with there being an open question whether things that are M are also N.
    This response shows, again, that the naturalist can deny premise (3) in the
    argument, or perhaps the inference from (4) to (5). She certainly can deny that the
    argument supports (7) and the rejection of moral naturalism. This approach shows
    that there is room for Non-analytic Reductive Naturalism according to which, for
    each moral property M, there is some natural property N such that M is identical to
    N, but the proposition that M is identical to N is in each case a posteriori. Theories
    of this kind have been proposed by Richard Boyd (1988, p. 181-228) and also by
    me (Copp, 1995a, 2007).
    Where did Moore go wrong? Moore was apparently assuming that nothing
    counts as a natural property unless we have non-moral terminology that represents it.
    So if a moral property M is a natural property, there must be a predicate “N” couched
    in wholly naturalistic terminology such that M is identical to N. And he was apparently
    assuming that the truth of such a proposition would require that it be an analytic or
    conceptual truth that M is N. Sturgeon has pointed out, however, that a naturalist
    can deny both ideas (Sturgeon, 2006, p. 95-99). Naturalism is the metaphysical thesis
    that moral properties are natural. It need not presuppose a thesis about language."
    -David Copp, "Varieties of Moral Naturalism", Filosofia Unisinos, 13 (2-supplement):280-295, octobre 2012.



    Dernière édition par Johnathan R. Razorback le Lun 16 Mar - 16:06, édité 1 fois


    _________________
    « La question n’est pas de constater que les gens vivent plus ou moins pauvrement, mais toujours d’une manière qui leur échappe. »
    -Guy Debord, Critique de la séparation (1961).

    Johnathan R. Razorback
    Johnathan R. Razorback
    Admin

    Messages : 7743
    Date d'inscription : 12/08/2013
    Localisation : France

    David Copp, Varieties of Moral Naturalism Empty Re: David Copp, Varieties of Moral Naturalism

    Message par Johnathan R. Razorback le Lun 16 Mar - 11:59

    "The “Argument from Queerness”

    In the first chapter of his 1977 book, Ethics: Inventing Right and Wrong, J.L. Mackie claims that there are no “objective values,” and he describes this view
    as a skeptical view about morality. Indeed it is a skeptical view, since it entails, as he understands it, that there are no moral rights and wrongs, goods or bads. He offers several skeptical arguments, but the most important and interesting is his “argument from queerness” (Mackie, 1977, p. 95-96). The argument depends on two key premises:

    (1) Any moral property M would be “intrinsically prescriptive”; that is, it would be constitutive of the nature of M that, necessarily, for any person P, if P believes that X is M, then P is appropriately motivated at least to some degree.

    (2) Any moral property M would be “categorical”; that is, M is not a psychological property or relation and, for any X, if X is M, the fact that X is M does not depend on anyone’s contingent attitudes or motivations.

    (3) It is not possible that a property is both intrinsically prescriptive and categorical.

    (4) Therefore, there are no moral properties.

    (5) If there are no moral properties, then no moral judgment that predicates a moral property of something is true.

    Therefore, (6) No (basic) moral claim is true.

    Hence, there are no moral rights or wrongs, goods or bads. It is not the case that torture is wrong, for instance.
    Mackie’s argument is an all-purpose argument against moral realism. It is not specifically directed against naturalism. Yet we can better understand the options available to moral naturalism by examining problems with the argument.

    Mackie’s argument has been much discussed over the past thirty-five years, and, as we saw in the case of Moore’s argument, by now there are standard responses. There are two main lines of response, corresponding to the two main premises of the argument. Each denies one of the premises.

    The first response denies premise (1), which is a version of “moral judgment
    internalism.” Many naturalists find internalism of this kind highly doubtful and are
    inclined to accept the externalist position, according to which there is no necessary
    connection between moral belief and motivation, at least not a connection of the
    kind assumed by Mackie.
    Imagine an amoralist, a person who has moral beliefs but is completely unmoved.
    Such a person might agree that torture is morally wrong but yet be unmoved
    by its wrongness; such a person might contend that torture should be willingly used
    by the state in pursuing its interests. Or such a person might persuaded by the moral
    arguments against eating meat and yet experience no change in his willingness to
    eat meat, happily partaking of Brazilian grilled beef and New Zealand lamb without
    any feeling of guilt. His amoralism might be selective or global. If selective, he
    would be moved to avoid some actions he deems wrong, but the explanation for
    this would presumably not simply be that he deems the actions wrong, since he
    is not at all moved to avoid other actions that he deems wrong. Such a character
    seems entirely conceivable, as David Brink (1984) has argued.5 If we can imagine
    an amoralist without any obvious incoherence, then modal judgment internalism
    seems doubtful at best, and if it is doubtful, then Mackie’s argument is in trouble.
    A variety of other philosophers have also argued against moral judgment
    internalism, including Sigrun Svavarsdottir (1999) and myself. Svavarsdottir points
    out that people differ in the degree to which they are moved by moral considerations
    and that the degree to which a person is moved by moral considerations can
    change with time, depending on a variety of psychological factors. She contends
    that the simplest explanation of this is that one’s motivation to be moral depends
    on the existence of an independent desire to be moral, which can vary in strength
    (Svavarsdottir, 1999). I argue that a person’s disposition to be moral can be undermined
    and defeated by certain metaethical beliefs about morality (Copp, 1995b).
    For example, one might be persuaded that it is completely irrational to be moral,
    and this belief might cause one to lose all motivation to be moral. Or one might
    believe that morality is based in the commands of a jealous and exacting God whose
    commands undermine human happiness and require unreasonable sacrifices. A
    person with such a belief might feel sufficiently alienated from morality and from
    God that he lacks all motivation to be moral.
    There are arguments on the other side, of course, including persuasive arguments
    by Michael Smith (1994). Smith contends, very plausibly, that we would doubt
    a person’s sincerity if she claimed to think that she ought to give to charity but
    never made a contribution and showed no tendency whatsoever to make a donation
    when someone asked her to contribute to Oxfam. And he contends that a change
    in moral motivation is connected so closely with a change in moral belief that the
    change in belief plausibly guarantees the change in motivation. These arguments
    are well worth attention, but they can be resisted. So there remains the strategy of
    resisting Mackie’s skeptical argument by resisting his moral judgment internalism.
    The second response to the argument from queerness denies premise (2).
    Denying premise (1) leads to an externalist form of moral naturalism, but denying
    premise (2) leads to a kind of internalist psychologism. According to such a view,
    moral properties are “response-dependent” properties in something like the way
    that colors are response-dependent properties. It is sometimes suggested that for
    something to be red is for it to be such that a person with normal vision would
    experience it as being red, or would experience it as being relevantly similar to fire
    engines, for example. One might propose, similarly, that for an act to be wrong is
    for it to be such that people with normal psychologies would tend to disapprove
    of it. Such a view has been proposed by Bruce Brower (1993). On this kind of view,
    moral properties are in a way psychological relations between types of actions and
    human psychology. On such a view, the fact that something has a moral property
    depends on contingent human psychological reactions.
    There are both relativist and non-relativist views of this kind. Jesse Prinz (2007)
    offers a relativistic view, according to which an action’s being wrong in relation to
    a given person depends on that person’s tendency to disapprove. Justin D’Arms
    and Daniel Jacobson (2006) offer a non-relativistic version.7 On their account, just
    as the fact that certain foods are disgusting is a function of the human tendency
    to react to those foods with disgust, so perhaps, the fact that certain actions are
    wrong is a function of the human tendency to react with disapproval.
    The Objection that Naturalism cannot Account
    for the Normativity of Moral Judgment
    The final objection I will discuss maintains that moral naturalism cannot account
    for the normativity of moral judgment. This objection is found in recent work
    by Derek Parfit (2011),8 but it can perhaps be seen as the underlying motivation for all
    the arguments we have discussed so far. Why would the is/ought gap seem to have
    more significance than the physics/biology gap? Perhaps because “ought judgements”
    are normative whereas biological judgments are ordinary descriptive judgments just
    as physical claims are ordinary descriptive judgments. Why would one find the open
    question argument to be persuasive despite the fact that its central premises seem
    to be falsified by examples of the kinds we discussed from mathematics and physics?
    Perhaps because these examples do not involve normative judgments whereas
    the target of the argument is the idea that a normative judgment could have nonnormative
    truth conditions. The argument from queerness rests on moral judgment
    internalism, but why do so many philosophers find moral judgment internalism to be
    plausible despite counter-examples and the lack of a decisive argument in its favor?
    Perhaps because it seems the best available account of what the normativity of moral
    judgment comes to. One might think, for instance, that moral judgments are normative
    precisely in the sense that moral belief entails moral motivation. Moral beliefs
    are relevant to action and choice precisely in the sense that they entail an inclination
    to act and choose appropriately. Perhaps, then, the underlying reason that many
    philosophers think moral naturalism is implausible is that they think moral naturalism
    cannot plausibly account for the normativity of moral judgment.
    In a highly influential paper, “Internal and External Reasons,” Bernard Williams
    (1981) raised doubts about the normativity of morality. To understand these
    doubts, we first need to understand Williams’s thesis that there are only “internal
    reasons,” reasons grounded in agents’ subjective motivational sets. On Williams’s
    view, one has a reason to do something only if one could be motivated to do the
    thing by sound reasoning given one’s existing motivations and given accurate nonnormative
    beliefs. To support this view, Williams argued as follows:
    (1) A fact F is a reason for someone to do something only if that fact could
    be the person’s reason to do the thing – only if it could be the reason for which
    the person does the thing.
    (2) If a fact F could be a person’s reason for doing something, then it must
    be that the person could be led to do the thing by reflecting on F, given her existing
    motivations, assuming at least that she had accurate non-normative beliefs.
    (3) Hence, a fact F is a reason for someone to do something only if the person’s
    existing motivations are such that the person could be led to do the thing by
    reflection on F, assuming that she had accurate non-normative beliefs.
    As Williams says, there are only “internal reasons.”
    Williams’s thesis that there are only internal reasons poses a challenge to
    the normativity of morality. To see why, note first that it is widely assumed that the
    normativity of morality depends on whether moral considerations are a source of
    reasons for action.9 This assumption can be challenged, but it is surely plausible,
    so let us assume it is correct for the sake of argument. Now if Williams is right that
    there are only internal reasons, it follows that moral considerations are a source
    of reasons for a person to act only if the person has appropriate antecedent motivations
    such that reflection on moral considerations could motivate him to act,
    given accurate non-moral beliefs. That is, moral considerations just as such are not
    a source of reasons for action. Moreover, nothing would seem to guarantee that a
    person’s antecedent motivations are such that reflection on her moral duties would
    lead her to be motivated to do her duty. Hence, it would seem, nothing guarantees
    that a person has any reason to be moral. A rational person could ignore morality
    in deciding how to act. But if so, one might think, there is nothing normative about
    morality. Or, more cautiously, either morality is not necessarily normative, or the
    content of morality depends somehow on the psychology of agents.
    Some philosophers respond to this challenge by denying that morality is necessarily
    a source of reasons for action, and so they deny that morality is necessarily
    normative. This is a kind of deflationist view about the normativity of morality. So-called
    Cornell moral realists, including Nicholas Sturgeon (1985), Richard Boyd (1988), David
    Brink (1986), and Peter Railton (1986), have proposed a kind of naturalism according
    to which whether morality is normative depends on whether people care about what
    is morally good or morally required. People with normal psychologies do care, so morality
    is a source of reasons for them to act appropriately, and morality is normative
    for them. But it is not necessarily normative. Moral facts are simply ordinary natural
    facts and they have no essential or necessary link to motivation or to reasons for action.
    Neither is moral belief necessarily linked to motivation, so the view denies moral
    judgment internalism. But given what is involved in acting wrongly, and given what
    injustice involves, anyone with an ordinary concern for her fellow human beings would
    of course be motivated to avoid wrongdoing and injustice. The connection between
    morality and motivation on such a view is contingent, but it is not accidental. It is due
    to the nature of morality together with the nature of normal human concern.
    A second kind of response to the challenge accepts that the content of
    morality depends on the psychology of agents. Gilbert Harman (1977) proposed a
    relativistic view of this kind. Response-dependence theory is another view of this
    kind. According to response-dependence theory, normative properties are relevantly
    response-dependent in the sense we discussed before. For instance, on one such
    view, the wrongness of an action is simply the property the action has of being such
    that people with normal psychologies would tend to disapprove of it. As we saw,
    a view of this kind has been proposed by Brower, Prinz, and D’Arms and Jacobson.
    On this view, wrongness is a source of internal reasons for people with normal
    psychologies, for reflection on the wrongness of an action would tend to lead one
    to disapprove of it, assuming one is psychologically normal. People with normal
    psychologies tend to be motivated to avoid wrongdoing.
    I cannot accept either of these approaches because I think that it is essential
    to morality’s being what it is that it is normative. Moral considerations have a
    characteristic essential relevance to decisions and choices. The relevance of moral
    considerations to decisions and actions is not merely contingent.
    I would respond to Williams by arguing that his argument is flawed.10 The main
    problem is with his premise (2). I maintain that the wrongness of an action is itself a
    moral reason not to perform it. I agree with Williams that this means among other
    things that the wrongness of an action could be an agent’s reason not to perform
    it. And it follows that there are possible circumstances in which a person would
    be motivated not to do something by her belief that the action would be wrong.
    But this does not entail that the agent’s antecedent motivations must be such that
    merely reflecting on the wrongness of an action could lead her to be motivated not
    to do it. It does not entail that the content of morality depends in any problematic
    way on the psychology of agents nor that all reasons are based in human psychology.
    All that follows is that it is possible for a person to be appropriately motivated
    by her moral beliefs. Williams’s argument therefore does not show that there are
    no external reasons. It only shows that the field of reasons is limited by the field of
    possible human motivation. There is therefore room to reject Williams’s thesis that
    there are only internal reasons.
    If we can reject Williams’s thesis, we can resist the associated challenge to
    the normativity of morality. Despite this, however, I take very seriously the idea
    that an adequate metaethics must account for and explain the normativity of
    morality. In my view, moral considerations are necessarily normative and they are
    normative in a robust sense that needs to be explained. The trouble is to provide
    an adequate explanation in a way that is compatible with moral realism. My own
    account combines my so-called standard-based account of the truth conditions of
    normative judgments with a pluralist and teleological account of the underlying
    nature of normativity.
    According to pluralist teleology, normative facts concern solutions to, or ways
    to ameliorate, certain generic problems faced by human beings in the circumstances
    of their ordinary lives.11 I call these, problems of normative governance, because
    they are problems that we can better cope with when we subscribe to appropriate
    systems of norms. Two of the most important and most familiar problems of this
    kind are the problem of sociality and the problem of autonomy.
    The problem of sociality is the problem humans face because, although they
    need to live in societies, there are familiar causes of discord and conflict that risk
    undermining societies or at least making societies less successful than they otherwise
    could be at enabling people to have lives of the kinds they want to have. The currency
    of a moral code in a society can help to ameliorate this problem provided its
    content is such that people who subscribe to it are thereby motivated to cooperate,
    and generally to avoid discord and conflict and to act in “pro-social” ways. Of
    course, some moral codes would do more than others to ameliorate the problem.
    My “society-centered” proposal is that, roughly, the moral truth is a function of
    the content of the moral code the currency of which in society would do most to
    ameliorate the problem of sociality. Call this the “ideal code.” Given the standardbased
    account of the truth conditions of normative judgments, it follows that we
    are morally required to do something if and only if, and because, the ideal code
    requires us to do this. The fact that we are morally required to do something is the
    fact that the ideal code requires us to do it. We have decisive moral reason to do
    something if and only if, and because, the ideal code requires us to do it. On this
    view, morality is the solution to a problem in social engineering, the problem of
    equipping people to live comfortably and successfully together in societies.12
    The problem of autonomy is a familiar problem each of us faces because of
    the complexity of our psychologies and because we live through extended periods
    of time. We have things that we value, in that we aim to achieve them and we
    attach great psychological significance to whether we are successful. We tend to
    feel enhanced or sustained when we are successful and we tend to feel shame or
    guilt or to feel diminished when we fail. In this sense, our values are aspects of our
    “identities.” An “autonomous” person does well at governing her life in accord
    with what she values. The trouble is that we are easily distracted by temptations
    and we often find our commitment to our values wavering, especially in cases in
    which costs to our values are uncertain or temporally remote. Our subscription to
    a norm that calls on us to promote the conditions of our autonomy can ameliorate
    this problem by enhancing and reinforcing our motivation to live in accord with our
    values. Call this the “autonomy norm.” On the standard-based account, it follows
    that the truth as to what we have most practical reason to do is a function of what
    is required by the autonomy norm. We are required to do something as a matter
    of practical rationality if and only if, and because, the norm of autonomy requires
    us to do this. We have decisive practical reason to do something if and only if, and
    because, the norm of autonomy requires us to do it. The fact that we have decisive
    practical reason to do something is the fact that the norm of autonomy requires
    us to do it.13
    My account of the nature of normative moral facts and facts about practical
    reasons can be generalized to provide an account of all kinds of normative fact. I
    call the generalized view pluralist-teleology. It is pluralist, for it says that there are
    different kinds of normative fact. There are, for instance, different kinds of reasons,
    including moral reasons, self-grounded practical reasons, epistemic reasons, and so
    on. The view is teleological in that it seeks to explain normativity as “grounded in”
    solutions to problems of normative governance. Pluralist-teleology aims to provide
    a unified account of reasons of all of kinds.
    Pluralist-teleology holds that morality is essentially and intrinsically normative.
    It holds that morality is a source of external reasons. It denies moral judgment
    internalism. It is a kind of non-analytic normative naturalism, for of course I do not
    claim that the theory or its central claims are conceptual or analytic truths. This
    obviously is not the place to present the theory in detail. My brief account of the
    view raises many questions, but I will have to set them aside for present purposes.
    Conclusion: Varieties of Moral Naturalism
    Given our examination of the four anti-naturalist and anti-realist arguments,
    we can now describe the varieties of moral naturalism. The theories can be considered
    on two dimensions, the metaphysical and epistemological dimension and the
    dimension of motivation and normativity.
    On the first dimension, we can distinguish three kinds of theory. There is
    non-reductive naturalism. On such a view, moral properties are natural properties
    yet it might not be possible to represent them in non-moral terminology. Nicholas
    Sturgeon has proposed a view of this kind. There is also reductive naturalism of the
    non-analytic variety. On such a view, each moral property M is identical to some
    natural property N, yet such identity claims are not analytic or conceptual truths.
    My own society-centered view is a kind of non-analytic reductive naturalism. And
    finally, there is reductive naturalism of the analytic variety. On such a view, each
    moral property M is identical to some natural property N and true claims of this
    form are analytic or conceptual truths. Frank Jackson (1998) has recently argued
    for a view of this kind.
    Turning to the second dimension, the dimension of normativity and moral
    motivation, we also find three varieties of naturalism. First, there is internalist naturalism.
    On one view of this kind, moral properties are response-dependent, such
    that, necessarily, people with normal responses are appropriately motivated. This
    kind of view is a reductive naturalism, and it could be viewed as analytic or as nonanalytic.
    Second is simple externalist naturalism. On this view, there is merely the
    contingent fact that people with normal responses are appropriately motivated by
    their moral beliefs. This view could be combined with any of the three metaphysical
    views, the non-reductive view or either of the two reductive views. Finally, there is
    externalist naturalism with the standard-based account of normativity. On this view,
    it is merely a contingent fact that people with normal responses are appropriately
    motivated by their moral beliefs, but normativity is explained otherwise, on the basis
    that normative facts are relevant facts about solutions to problems of normative
    governance. A view of this kind could be combined with either sort of reductive
    naturalism, the analytic or the non-analytic variety. I myself have proposed that the
    view is best understood as a kind of non-analytic reductive naturalism.
    We obviously would like to know where the truth lies. Speaking for myself,
    I cannot accept any form of anti-realism. There surely are moral facts. There are
    moral claims that cannot plausibly be denied. And our moral convictions surely are
    beliefs. I cannot think otherwise. So I am led to moral realism. But if we are to be
    realists and if we are to explain how moral facts fit into a naturalistic view of the
    world, we must be moral naturalists. The question of course is whether naturalism
    is ultimately defensible, and if so, which variety of naturalism is the most promising?
    My own judgment is that the most plausible view is a kind of reductive but
    non-analytic naturalism. If naturalism is true, this is surely is not an analytic or a
    conceptual truth. But an adequate metaethical theory must provide a substantive
    account of what normativity consists in, so it must be reductive. And given the
    implausibility of moral judgment internalism, our account must be a form of externalism,
    but one that provides a substantive account of normativity. So, to provide a
    substantive account of the nature of morality and of the nature of normativity, we
    must find some plausible reductionist theory, even if the theory cannot sensibly be
    viewed as an analytic or conceptual truth. I know of no alternative to the combined
    standard-based pluralist teleology that I have proposed. This explains very briefly
    why I am where I am."
    -David Copp, "Varieties of Moral Naturalism", Filosofia Unisinos, 13 (2-supplement):280-295, octobre 2012.



    _________________
    « La question n’est pas de constater que les gens vivent plus ou moins pauvrement, mais toujours d’une manière qui leur échappe. »
    -Guy Debord, Critique de la séparation (1961).

    Johnathan R. Razorback
    Johnathan R. Razorback
    Admin

    Messages : 7743
    Date d'inscription : 12/08/2013
    Localisation : France

    David Copp, Varieties of Moral Naturalism Empty Re: David Copp, Varieties of Moral Naturalism

    Message par Johnathan R. Razorback le Lun 16 Mar - 16:26

    "Nous avons tous des convictions morales. Nous considérons qu'il est vrai, par exemple, que la torture est mauvaise, que la compassion est une vertu, qu'il existe un droit à la liberté d'expression.

    Ces croyances sont normatives ou évaluatives ; elles concernent ce que nous devons ou ne pas faire, ou ce qui est valable ou digne de notre choix, ou ce que nous devons garantir, indépendamment de ce que nous apprécions nous-mêmes. Si manger de la viande est mal, par exemple, l'injustice de cette action ne dépend pas du fait nous aimons en manger ou de ce que nous apprécions dans la vie. Néanmoins, son caractère erronée signifie que nous devons éviter de manger de la viande.
    "

    "Il y a là une difficulté. Car nos convictions morales concernent ce que nous devons faire ou ce que nous devrions choisir ou valoriser, et non ce que nous sommes réellement enclins à faire ou la façon dont nous agissons ou choisissons réellement ou ce à quoi nous attachons réellement de l'importance. La question est de savoir ce qui, dans le monde pourrait faire en sorte que ces croyances soient vraies ? Il ne semble pas y avoir de place dans le monde naturel pour des faits du type de ceux qui devraient exister pour que notre que les croyances morales soient vraies. Disons que le monde naturel est constitué de tout ce que nous pourrions apprendre par les sens, y compris ce que nous pouvons apprendre grâce à la science ainsi que ce que nous pouvons apprendre de manière moins sophistiquée. La science est très puissante. Mais elle ne semble pas avoir le pouvoir de découvrir des faits normatifs, des faits sur la façon dont les choses devraient ou ne devraient pas être. Elle ne semble pas avoir le pouvoir de révéler que la torture est un mal ou que la compassion est une vertu. Elle ne semble pas avoir le pouvoir pour révéler si manger de la viande est mauvais. En effet, il semblerait malavisé de proposer que la science pourrait décider si manger de la viande est mauvais, ou que pour décider si manger de la viande est mal, ce que nous devons faire, c'est réaliser des enquêtes empiriques. En bref, il ne semble pas y avoir de place pour les faits normatifs dans l'image que nous avons du monde naturel. S'il existe des faits normatifs, il semble ils ne pouvaient pas être des faits naturels."

    "Une deuxième difficulté est liée à la première, mais elle est peut-être plus subtile. La première difficulté est de savoir si un fait moral peut être un fait naturel. C'est le problème de l'explication ce qui pourrait faire qu'une croyance morale soit vraie. La deuxième difficulté commence avec l'idée que nos croyances morales sont normatives et qu'un fait moral serait un fait normatif. C'est-à-dire que nos croyances morales ont une caractéristique importante, la propriété d'être normatif. C'est parce que les croyances morales sont normatives qu'il semble impossible qu'un fait naturel puisse rendre une telle croyance vraie. Un fait qui rendrait une croyance morale vraie devrait lui-même être normative, et l'image que nous du monde naturel ne semble pas laisser de place aux faits normatifs.

    Mais cela nous amène à une deuxième énigme. La question est de savoir ce qu'il faut pour qu'une croyance ou un fait soit normatif ? La première difficulté est, en effet, qu'il semble impossible pour tout fait naturel d'être normatif, il semble donc impossible qu'un fait naturel rende une croyance vraie. La deuxième énigme est le problème de l'explication de la normativité. Si la normativité des croyances morales et des faits n'est pas une caractéristique naturaliste qu'ils possèdent, alors de quel type de fonctionnalité s'agit-il et en quoi consiste-t-elle ?
    "

    "Naturalisme moral.

    Malgré la force intuitive de ces deux difficultés, un naturaliste moral maintient que les faits moraux sont des faits naturels et que leur normativité est une caractéristique naturelle qu'ils possèdent. Le naturalisme moral est donc une position optimiste. Il voit la vérité morale et la normativité comme des phénomènes naturels.

    Pour bien comprendre à quel point le naturalisme moral est optimiste, permettez-moi d'exposer les doctrines centrales qui le distinguent de ses concurrents. Pour commencer, le naturalisme moral
    est une forme de réalisme moral, il doit donc être distingué de toutes les formes de l'anti-réalisme moral. Il y a quatre doctrines centrales qui sont partagées par les réalistes, tel que je comprends cette position, et cela distingue le réalisme moral de l'anti-réalisme.

    Le naturalisme moral doit bien sûr aussi être distingué des formes antinaturalistes de réalisme moral. Il existe une cinquième doctrine qui est partagée par les naturalistes moraux et qui distingue le naturalisme moral du réalisme moral non-naturaliste.

    Tout d'abord, un réaliste moral soutient, comme je le disais, qu'il existe des propriétés morales. Les actions qui sont mauvaises ont quelque chose en commun en vertu duquel elles sont mauvaises. Elles sont similaires à cet égard. Ce qu'elles ont en commun, c'est bien sûr qu'elles sont toutes mauvaises, c'est-à-dire qu'elles ont toutes la propriété d'être mauvaises.
    Les états de caractère vertueux ont quelque chose en commun en vertu duquel ils sont similaires ; ce qu'ils ont en commun, c'est la propriété d'être une vertu. Et ainsi de suite.
    C'est-à-dire qu'il y a le mal moral et qu'il y a la propriété d'être une vertu morale. Il y a des propriétés morales.

    Il existe bien sûr d'anciens débats philosophiques sur ces similitudes et sur la façon de les comprendre. Je dis qu'il y a des propriétés morales, et je dis aussi qu'il existe de nombreuses propriétés naturelles, telles que la propriété d'être à feuilles caduques, la propriété d'être un arbre à caoutchouc, la propriété d'être un hallucinogène.

    Mais pour les besoins de la présente étude, je ne prends pas de position particulière dans le domaine métaphysique les débats sur la nature des soi-disant propriétés. Il n'y a pas besoin pour être un réalisme moral de prendre une position particulière dans ces débats. Il doit simplement insister sur le fait que les propriétés morales ont la même nature métaphysique de base que toutes les autres propriétés, quelle que soit cette nature.

    Deuxièmement, un réaliste moral insiste sur le fait que certaines propriétés morales sont instanciées. Ce qui veut juste dire que certains types d'action sont mauvais et que certains traits de caractère sont des vertus. Les gens font de mauvaises choses et de bonnes choses. Certains sont bons et certains sont vicieux. Le monde actuel comprend des personnes, des événements, et des situations qui présentent des caractéristiques morales, telles que le fait d'être mauvais ou d'être vicieux ou d'être injuste. En bref, il y a des faits moraux.

    Troisièmement, les prédicats moraux sont utilisés pour attribuer des propriétés morales. Le prédicat "mauvais" est utilisé pour désigner le mal ; le prédicat "juste" est utilisé pour désigner la justice.
    Et ainsi de suite. Notre langage moral est employé pour choisir les aspects dans lesquels les choses sont moralement similaires et pour décrire les choses en fonction de ces similitudes. Bien sûr, un réaliste ne nie pas qu'il puisse y avoir des subtilités morales que nous n'avons pas encore comprises. Un réaliste moral admettrait que les gens ont été moralement obtus pendant de vastes périodes de l'histoire, et il admet volontiers qu'il y a eu et qu'il pourrait bien y avoir un progrès moral dans l'avenir. Cette troisième thèse est simplement que le langage moral ne fonctionne pas d'une manière particulière qui le distingue fondamentalement du langage descriptif ordinaire. Les prédicats moraux désignent les propriétés morales comme les prédicats descriptifs ordinaires désignent des propriétés factuelles. La phrase "La torture est injuste" attribue à la torture une similarité avec d'autres types d'action, tout comme la phrase "La torture est répandue", attribue à la torture une similitude à d'autres types d'actions qui sont répandues.

    Quatrièmement, les affirmations morales expriment des croyances morales. J'ai commencé par dire que nous avons des croyances morales. Nous pensons que certains types d'actions sont mauvais et nous pensons que certains traits de caractère sont des vertus. Ce quatrième point est simplement que les affirmations morales ne fonctionnent pas d'une manière particulière qui les distingue fondamentalement de
    la manière dont les affirmations ordinaires fonctionnent. Les assertions ordinaires expriment des croyances ordinaires. Si j'affirme
    que la torture est répandue, j'exprime la conviction ordinaire que la torture est répandue. Et, selon le réalisme, si j'affirme que la torture est mal, j'exprime une autre croyance ordinaire, la croyance que la torture est mauvaise.

    Il est utile d'insister sur ce point, car certains philosophes soutiennent que les états mentaux que nous exprimons en faisant des affirmations morales ne sont pas des croyances, ou qu'elles sont métaphysiquement différentes d'une manière cruciale par rapport aux états mentaux exprimés par des assertions non morales ordinaires. Dans cette optique, les affirmations que la torture est un mal et l'affirmation selon laquelle la torture est répandue exprime différents types d'états mentaux. Un réaliste moral le nie. Il insiste sur le fait que les croyances morales ont la même nature métaphysique de base que les autres croyances.

    Cinquièmement, et pour finir, le naturalisme moral ajoute que les propriétés morales sont des propriétés naturelles. C'est-à-dire qu'elles ont le même statut métaphysique et épistémologique de base
    que les propriétés naturelles ordinaires telles que la rougeur, la caducité et la propriété d'être un wagon de chemin de fer. Il y a bien sûr matière à débattre de ce qu'il en est exactement.

    Ailleurs, j'ai contribué au débat (Copp, 2007, ch. 1). Pour les besoins de la présente étude, l'important est simplement que, en s'engageant à respecter cette cinquième doctrine, le naturaliste moral s'engage à résoudre les deux énigmes que j'ai exposées dans la section précédente. Il s'engage à expliquer comment il se pourrait que les faits moraux soient des faits de même nature que les faits naturels ordinaires et il s'engage à expliquer, en termes naturalistes, en quoi consiste la normativité de ces faits.

    Compte tenu de la force intuitive des deux difficultés, on peut naturellement se demander pourquoi n'importe qui adopterait un point de vue aussi audacieux. Avons-nous des raisons d'être optimiste concernant le fait que le naturalisme moral pourrait être vrai ?

    Pourquoi le naturalisme ?

    Certains naturalistes moraux sont motivés par des raisons métaphysiques et des préoccupations épistémologiques. L'idée qu'un être humain ordinaire ou qu'un événement ou une action ordinaire
    peut avoir une propriété "non naturelle" peut sembler déroutante et effrayante. L'idée même qu'il existe de telles propriétés peut sembler extravagante. De plus, il peut sembler curieux de savoir comment nous avons pu savoir qu'une telle propriété est instanciée. Je suppose ici que si nos connaissances de base sur la nature d'une propriété et sur son instanciation sont empiriques, alors c'est une propriété naturelle. Ainsi, si les propriétés morales ne sont pas naturelles, notre connaissance des actions qui sont bonnes ou mauvaises et des traits de caractère vertueux devrait s'acquérir d'une manière non empirique. On ne sait pas très bien comment cela pourrait se faire. Pour des raisons de ce genre,
    de nombreux philosophes estiment que nous devrions éviter d'alourdir notre ontologie avec l'hypothèse selon laquelle il existe des propriétés non naturelles, à moins qu'il n'y ait pas d'alternative.

    L'hypothèse selon laquelle les propriétés morales ne sont pas naturelles ne fait rien pour expliquer leur nature et rien pour expliquer ce en quoi leur normativité pourrait consister. Elle laisse donc les deux difficultés irrésolues, entendue dès lors comme des énigmes sur la façon dont il pourrait y avoir des propriétés morales et pas seulement comment elles pourraient être des propriétés naturelles. Le naturalisme pourrait au moins sembler proposer une stratégie pour expliquer la nature des propriétés morales et leur normativité, la stratégie consistant à assimiler d'une manière ou d'une autre les propriétés morales des propriétés d'un genre familier. Donc, si nous acceptons les quatre doctrines du réalisme moral, il peut sembler que nous ayons des raisons explicatives pour essayer de développer une version du naturalisme moral, ainsi que des raisons métaphysiques et épistémologiques de le faire.

    On pourrait suggérer que nous devrions plutôt abandonner le réalisme moral. Mais je veux résister à la tentation d'aller dans cette direction, car nous avons des convictions morales -que nous croyons être des vérités morales- et ces croyances donnent l'impression d'être des croyances ordinaires sur des situations ordinaires. En outre, les préoccupations morales semblent faire partie de notre expérience ordinaire. Par exemple, il fait partie de notre expérience ordinaire qu'il y a des gens mauvais comme des gens bons, que des gens commettent des fautes horribles et que de temps en temps, des gens font des choses merveilleusement louables. Nous sommes conscients de ces faits de manière ordinaire. On les apprends dans des histoires, par exemple.

    Et parfois, nous pouvons comprendre et expliquer les actions des gens sur la base de leur caractère moral, tout comme parfois nous pouvons comprendre et expliquer les actions des gens comme des réponses aux injustices. Tout cela fait partie du monde naturel de notre expérience. Pour des raisons de ce genre, le naturaliste est réticent à abandonner le réalisme moral et d'admettre l'idée gênante que les propriétés morales ne sont pas naturelles.

    Variétés du naturalisme.

    Le défi du naturalisme moral est de répondre en quelque façon aux deux difficultés centrales en expliquant comment les faits moraux peuvent faire partie du monde naturel de notre expérience et en expliquant en quoi peut consister leur normativité, d'une manière
    qui est compatible avec leur naturalité. Nous pouvons organiser notre examen des types de stratégies disponibles pour les naturalistes en examinant en détail quatre principales objections au naturalisme moral. Ces objections peuvent être considérées comme des tentatives de
    de rendre les deux difficultés plus précises. Les principales variétés du naturalisme moral peuvent être considérées à leur tour comme découlant des réponses aux objections.

    Les quatre principales objections sont l'objection de la Loi de Hume [l'Is/Ought Gap], l'argument de la question ouverte, l'objection de l'étrangeté, et l'objection selon laquelle le naturalisme ne peut s'accommoder de la normativité. Je vais en discuter, brièvement, dans l'ordre.

    L'objection de l'"Is/Ought Gap ou "écart entre les faits et la valeur".

    L'idée fondamentale qui sous-tend cette objection est qu'il existe une lacune logique entre les affirmations non normatives sur la façon dont les choses sont dans le monde et les affirmations normatives des revendications sur ce qui devrait être. L'idée est suggérée par David Hume dans un célèbre passage du Traité de la nature humaine, III 1.1. Hume écrit:

    "Je ne peux pas m’empêcher d’ajouter à ces raisonnements une remarque qui, peut-être, sera trouvée de quelque importance. Dans tous les systèmes de morale que j’ai rencontrés jusqu’alors, j’ai toujours remarqué que les auteurs, pendant un certain temps, procèdent selon la façon habituelle de raisonner et établissent l’existence de Dieu ou font des observations sur les affaires humaines ; puis, soudain, je suis surpris de voir qu’au lieu des habituelles copules est et n’est pas, je ne rencontre que des propositions reliées par un doit ou un ne doit pas. Ce changement est imperceptible mais néanmoins de la première importance. En effet, comme ce doit ou ne doit pas exprime une nouvelle relation ou affirmation, il est nécessaire qu’on la remarque et qu’on l’explique. En même temps, il faut bien expliquer comment cette nouvelle relation peut être déduite des autres qui en sont entièrement différentes car cela semble totalement inconcevable. Mais, comme les auteurs n’usent pas habituellement de cette précaution, je me permettrai de la recommander aux lecteurs et je suis persuadé que cette petite attention renversera tous les systèmes courants de morale et nous fera voir que la distinction du vice et de la vertu ne se fonde pas simplement sur les relations des objets et qu’elle n’est pas perçue par la raison."

    La question que nous abordons, cependant, est de savoir si les faits moraux  peuvent être des faits naturels. Le problème de l'objection est que même s'il y a un écart logique entre les revendications non normatives et les revendications morales, il ne suit pas
    que les faits moraux ne sont pas des faits naturels.

    Pour s'en convaincre, il suffit de constater qu'il existe des écarts similaires entre des types d'affirmations naturalistes. Comme l'a souligné Nicholas Sturgeon (2006), il existe un écart similaire
    entre les affirmations physiques et les affirmations biologiques (Sturgeon, 2006, p. 102-105). Peu importe la conjonction complexe de propositions purement physiques que vous avancerez, aucune proposition biologique ne s'ensuivra. Mais il ne s'ensuit évidemment pas
    que les faits biologiques ne sont pas des faits naturels. On pourrait même nier qu'il s'ensuit que la biologie ne puisse être réduite à la physique.

    Selon le naturaliste moral, l'écart entre les faits et les valeurs n'est pas différent de cet écart entre physique et biologique. Nous comprenons l'existence d'un écart physique/biologique comme étant compatible avec le fait que les faits physiques et biologiques soient simplement des faits naturels de nature différente. De façon similaire, le naturaliste moral soutient que nous devons comprendre le fossé entre les propositions factuelles et les propositions morales comme étant compatibles avec le fait que les faits naturels non normatifs et les faits moraux soient simplement deux types de faits naturels.

    L'argument de la "question ouverte".

    Cet argument a été proposé pour la première fois par G.E. Moore dans la section 13 de Principia Ethica (Moore, 1993 [1903]). C'est l'un des arguments les plus célèbres et les plus influents dans la philosophie du XXe siècle. Pour comprendre la forme qu'elle prend, nous avons besoin
    de comprendre que, pour Moore, la question fondamentale en matière d'éthique est la nature du bien [goodness]. Dans la section 5 de Principia, il dit que l'éthique est "l'enquête générale au sujet de ce qui est bon" et que sa question fondamentale est : "Qu'est-ce que le bon ? Ou , pourrions-nous, sa question est : "Qu'est-ce que la bonté ?"

    Moore soutient qu'il n'est pas possible de fournir une "définition" ou une "analyse" qui indique la nature de la qualité de la propriété d'être "bon", en spécifiant une propriété ou un ensemble de propriétés qui serait identifie au fait d'être bon. Comme l'argument de la question ouverte prétend le montrer, la bonté est indéfinissable ou non analysable.

    L'argument est toutefois généralement interprété comme un argument contre le naturalisme moral. Compris de cette manière, l'idée sous-jacente est probablement que si la bonté était une propriété naturelle, alors elle serait analysable. Car il serait possible de fournir une analyse qui montre qu'elle est identique à une quelconque propriété naturelle ou à un complexe de propriétés naturelles. L'argument peut être présenté comme suit :

    (1) Supposons que le terme "bien" désigne une propriété naturelle R

    (2) Alors, être bon, c'est être R. (Peut-être qu'être bon, c'est être ce que nous désirons désirer. Ou peut-être qu'être bon, c'est être agréable).

    (3) Par conséquent, la question "Est-il bon d'être R ?" est équivalente à "Est-il R d'être R ?"

    (4) Mais la question "Est-il bon d'être R ?" est doté d'un sens (et ouverte) alors que la question "Est-ce que c'est R d'être R ?" n'est pas doté d'un sens.

    (5) Par conséquent, les questions ne sont pas équivalentes.

    (6) La conclusion exprimée par (5) est en contradiction avec la conclusion exprimée par (3).

    (7) Par conséquent, la supposition exprimée au point (1) est fausse.
    Par conséquent, "Bien" ne désigne pas une propriété naturelle.

    C'est l'argument de la question ouverte. Une fois généralisé, il pourrait sembler montrer que le naturalisme moral ne peut pas être vrai.

    L'argument a été largement débattu au cours du siècle dernier et il existe aujourd'hui des réponses standard à ce sujet. J'aborderai trois lignes de réponse.

    Premièrement, comme l'a souligné Nicholas Sturgeon (2006, p. 98-99), l'argument semble dépendre de l'hypothèse selon laquelle le terme "bonté" ne désigne pas une propriété naturelle. Pour réussir, l'argument doit montrer que la bonté ne peut pas être identique à une quelconque propriété naturelle. Autrement dit, l'argument doit opérer quel que soit le terme désignant une propriété naturelle qui est substitué à "R" dans la présentation schématique de l'argument ci-dessus.

    Mais bien sûr, un naturaliste soutient que la bonté est elle-même une propriété naturelle. C'est pourquoi, pour un naturaliste, le terme "bonté"
    ou le prédicat "bon" peut être substitué à "R" dans l'argument. Mais avec cette substitution, la question "Est-il bon d'être R ?" est simplement la question "Est-il bon d'être bon ?" Et dans cette optique, bien sûr, la prémisse (4) est évidemment fausse.

    En effet, dans cette optique, la question "Est-il bon d'être R ?" et la question "Est-ce que c'est bien R d'être R" sont une seule et même question, à savoir la question "Est-ce que c'est bon d'être bon ?". Il ne peut donc pas être vrai que l'une d'entre elles soit dotée d'une signification et ouverte alors que l'autre ne l'est pas. Un naturaliste peut donc nier la prémisse (4).

    Cette réponse ouvre la voie à un naturalisme non réductionniste du type de celui proposé par Sturgeon. Le naturalisme non réductionniste soutient que les propriétés morales sont des propriétés naturelles mais ne vise pas à défendre des analyses réductrices des propriétés morales. Selon les formes réductionnistes du naturalisme moral, pour chaque propriété morale M, il existe une propriété naturelle N telle que pour être M, il faut être N, où "N" est une expression formulée en termes entièrement naturalistes, sans prédicat normatif […]
    Un naturaliste qui propose une théorie non réductionniste doit bien sûr défendre la proposition selon laquelle les propriétés morales sont des propriétés naturelles, mais il doit le faire sans s'appuyer sur de telles analyses réductrices.

    Je passe maintenant à la deuxième réponse à l'argument. Il a souvent été noté que les identités de propriété peuvent être non transparentes, en ce sens qu'il peut être vrai qu'une propriété M soit identique à une propriété N, même si cela n'est pas évident ou transparent à ceux qui connaissent bien M et N et qui sont compétents pour identifier M et N.

    Par exemple, le nombre 796 est identique à la différence entre 12.231 et 11 435, même si cela n'est pas évident. Cette affirmation implique une thèse sur l'identité de propriété [property Identity], car elle implique que la propriété qu'un ensemble peut avoir de 796 éléments constitutifs est identique à la propriété d'avoir 12.231 moins 11.435 membres. Pourtant cette égalité n'est pas évidente. Comme cela n'est pas évident, la question "Est-ce que 796 est égal à 12.231-11.435 ?" est dotée de sens et ouverte. Bien sûr, la question "Est-ce que 796 est égal à 796 ?" est trivial, mais cela ne remet pas en cause le fait que 796 = 12 231-11 435.

    De même, la question "Est-ce qu'un ensemble qui compte 796 membres possède 12 231 moins 11 435 membres ?" est dotée d'un sens, bien que la question: "Est-ce qu'un ensemble qui compte 796 membres possède 796 membres ?" soit triviale. Mais cela ne remet pas en cause le fait qu'avoir 796 membres, ce soit avoir 12 231 membres moins 11 435 membres. Le fait que l'une des deux questions soit dotée d'un sens que l'autre est triviale ne porte pas atteinte à l'égalité.

    Cette réponse montre qu'un naturaliste peut nier la prémisse (3) de l'argument, ou peut-être la déduction de (4) à (5). Il peut certainement nier que l'argument valide (7) et le rejet du naturalisme moral. Cette approche montre qu'il y a place pour le naturalisme analytique réductionnisme. Selon un tel point de vue, il est possible de fournir des analyses réductionnistes des propriétés morales, analyses qui identifient, pour chaque propriété morale M, une propriété naturelle N identique à M, où la proposition selon laquelle M est identique à N est analytique, ou est une vérité conceptuelle.

    L'argument serait que même si la proposition selon laquelle M est identique à N est analytique, ou même si c'est une vérité conceptuelle, elle ne l'est pas de manière transparente. L'argument de la question ouverte ne fonctionne donc pas.

    La troisième réponse à l'argument part du point de vue que les identités des propriétés peuvent être a posteriori. Considérons, par exemple, la proposition selon laquelle la chaleur est l'énergie cinétique moléculaire moyenne. Cette proposition est vraie, mais il ne s'agit pas d'une analyse ou d'une vérité conceptuelle. Elle est a posteriori dans le sens où l'on ne peut pas savoir si elle est vraie sans preuve empirique qui donne une information au-delà de l'information que l'on doit déjà avoir pour appréhender le concept de chaleur. Saul Kripke et Hilary Putnam a souligné que les définitions réductionnistes en science n'ont pas besoin d'être analytiques ou d'être des vérités conceptuelles (Putnam, 1981, p. 205-211 ; Kripke, 1980). Il y a donc un espace pour qu'un naturaliste puisse soutenir que les vraies propositions qui identifient, pour chaque propriétés morales M, certaines propriétés naturelles N qui sont identiques à M, sont a posteriori.

    Mais si la proposition selon laquelle M est identique à N est a posteriori, alors sa vérité est compatible avec le fait qu'il demeure une question ouverte de savoir si les choses qui sont M sont aussi N. Cette réponse montre, une fois de plus, que le naturaliste peut nier la prémisse (3) de l'argument, ou peut-être la déduction de (4) à (5). Il peut certainement nier que l'argument (7) et le rejet du naturalisme moral. Cette approche montre qu'il y a place pour un naturalisme réductionniste non-Analytique selon lequel, pour chaque propriété morale M, il existe une propriété naturelle N telle que M est identique à N, mais la proposition selon laquelle M est identique à N est dans chaque cas a posteriori. Des théories de ce type ont été proposées par Richard Boyd (1988, p. 181-228) et aussi par moi-même (Copp, 1995a, 2007).

    A quel moment Moore s'est-il trompé ? Moore supposait apparemment que rien ne compte comme une propriété naturelle, à moins que nous n'ayons une terminologie non morale qui la représente. Ainsi, si une propriété morale M est une propriété naturelle, il doit y avoir un prédicat "N" formulé dans une terminologie entièrement naturaliste, de sorte que M est identique à N. Et il était supposait apparemment que la vérité d'une telle proposition exigerait qu'elle soit analytique ou une vérité conceptuelle que M est N. Sturgeon a cependant fait remarquer qu'un naturaliste peut nier ces deux idées (Sturgeon, 2006, p. 95-99). Le naturalisme moral est la thèse métaphysique que les propriétés morales sont naturelles. Cela ne présuppose pas une thèse sur la nature du langage.

    "L'argument de la bizarrerie"

    Dans le premier chapitre de son livre de 1977, Ethics: Inventing Right and Wrong, J.L. Mackie affirme qu'il n'y a pas de "valeurs objectives", et il décrit ce point de vue comme une vision sceptique de la moralité. Il s'agit en effet d'une vision sceptique, car elle implique, tel qu'il le comprend, qu'il n'y a pas de justice et de torts moraux, de bonnes actions ou de mauvaises. Il propose plusieurs arguments sceptiques, mais le plus important et le plus intéressant est son "argument de la bizarrerie" (Mackie, 1977, p. 95-96). Cet argument repose sur deux prémisses essentielles :

    (1) Toute propriété morale M serait "intrinsèquement prescriptive", c'est-à-dire qu'il est constitutif de la nature de M que, nécessairement, pour toute personne P, si P croit que X est M, alors P est motivé de manière appropriée au moins dans une certaine mesure.

    (2) Toute propriété morale M serait "catégorique", c'est-à-dire que M n'est pas une propriété ou une relation psychologique et, pour toute personne X, si X est M, le fait que X soit M ne dépend pas des attitudes ou des motivations contingentes de quiconque.

    (3) Il n'est pas possible qu'une propriété soit à la fois intrinsèquement prescriptive et catégorique.

    (4) Il n'y a donc pas de propriétés morales.

    (5) S'il n'y a pas de propriétés morales, alors aucun jugement moral qui prédique une propriété morale de quelque chose n'est vrai.

    Par conséquent, (6) aucune revendication morale (de base) n'est vraie.

    Il n'y a donc pas de justice ou de torts moraux, de biens ou de maux. Il n'est donc pas vrai que la torture soit un mal, par exemple.

    L'argument de Mackie est un argument à cible multiples contre le réalisme moral. Il n'est pas spécifiquement dirigé contre le naturalisme. Pourtant, nous pouvons mieux comprendre les options qui s'offrent au naturalisme moral en examinant les problèmes que pose cet argument.

    L'argument de Mackie a fait l'objet de nombreuses discussions au cours des trente-cinq dernières années et, comme nous l'avons vu dans le cas de l'argument de Moore, il existe désormais des réponses standard. Il y a deux grandes lignes de réponse, correspondant aux deux principales prémisses de l'argument. Chacune d'entre elles nie l'une des prémisses.

    La première réponse nie la prémisse (1), qui est une version de "l'internalisme du jugement moral". De nombreux naturalistes trouvent ce type d'internalisme très douteux et sont enclins à accepter la position externaliste, selon laquelle il n'est pas nécessairement de lien entre la croyance morale et la motivation, du moins pas un lien du genre de ceux conçus par Mackie.

    Imaginez un amoraliste, une personne qui a des convictions morales mais qui est complètement insensible. Cette personne pourrait convenir que la torture est moralement condamnable, mais rester indifférente à sa dimension d'immoralité ; cette personne pourrait prétendre que la torture devrait être utilisée sans remords par l'État dans la poursuite de ses intérêts. Ou bien une telle personne pourrait être persuadée par les arguments moraux contre la consommation de viande et pourtant, ne pas expérimenter une modification de sa volonté de manger de la viande, en dégustant volontiers du bœuf brésilien grillé et de l'agneau néo-zélandais sans aucun sentiment de culpabilité. Son amoralisme peut être sélectif ou global. S'il est sélectif, il serait motivé par le souci d'éviter certaines actions qu'il juge mauvaises, mais l'explication n'en serait sans doute pas simplement qu'il juge les actions mauvaises, puisqu'il n'est pas du tout motivé pour éviter d'autres actions qu'il juge mauvaises. Un tel personnage semble tout à fait possible, comme l'a fait valoir David Brink (1984). Si l'on peut imaginer un amoraliste sans incohérence évidente, alors l'internalisme du jugement moral semble au mieux douteux, et s'il l'est, alors l'argument de Mackie est dans une mauvaise passe.

    Divers autres philosophes ont également plaidé contre l'internalisme du jugement moral, y compris Sigrun Svavarsdottir (1999) et moi-même. Les arguments de Svavarsdottir sont que les gens ne sont pas tous animés par des considérations morales et que la mesure dans laquelle une personne est mue par des considérations morales peut changer avec le temps, en fonction de divers facteurs psychologiques. Elle affirme que l'explication la plus simple est que la motivation d'une personne à être morale dépend de l'existence d'un désir indépendant d'être moral, dont la force peut varier (Svavarsdottir, 1999). Je soutiens que la disposition d'une personne à être morale peut être sapée et vaincue par certaines croyances métaéthiques sur la moralité (Copp, 1995b).

    -David Copp, "Varieties of Moral Naturalism", Filosofia Unisinos, 13 (2-supplement):280-295, octobre 2012.



    _________________
    « La question n’est pas de constater que les gens vivent plus ou moins pauvrement, mais toujours d’une manière qui leur échappe. »
    -Guy Debord, Critique de la séparation (1961).

    Johnathan R. Razorback
    Johnathan R. Razorback
    Admin

    Messages : 7743
    Date d'inscription : 12/08/2013
    Localisation : France

    David Copp, Varieties of Moral Naturalism Empty Re: David Copp, Varieties of Moral Naturalism

    Message par Johnathan R. Razorback le Lun 23 Mar - 20:26

    "Par exemple, on pourrait être persuadé qu'il est complètement irrationnel d'être moral, et cette croyance pourrait faire perdre toute motivation à être moral. Ou bien on pourrait croire que la moralité est fondée sur les commandements d'un Dieu jaloux et exigeant dont les commandements sapent le bonheur humain et exigent des sacrifices déraisonnables. Une personne ayant de telles croyances pourrait se sentir suffisamment éloignée de la morale et ainsi manquer de motivation pour être moral.

    Il y a des arguments de l'autre côté, bien sûr, y compris des arguments percutants comme ceux de Michael Smith (1994). Smith affirme, de manière très plausible, que nous douterions de la sincérité d'une personne si elle prétendait penser qu'on doit faire preuve de charité mais qu'elle n'a jamais fait de dons et n'a pas montré la moindre tendance à en faire lorsque quelqu'un lui a demandé de contribuer à Oxfam. Et il affirme qu'un changement de la motivation morale est si étroitement liée à un changement de croyance morale que le changement de croyance garantit de manière plausible le changement de motivation. Ces arguments méritent l'attention, mais on peut leur résister. Demeure donc la stratégie de résister à l'argument sceptique de Mackie en résistant à l'internalisme du jugement moral.

    La deuxième réponse à l'argument de l'étrangeté nie la prémisse (2). La négation de la prémisse (1) conduit à une forme externaliste de naturalisme moral, mais la négation de (2) conduit à une sorte d'internalisme psychologique. Selon ce point de vue, les propriétés morales sont des propriétés "dépendantes d'une réponse", d'une manière similaire à celle dont les couleurs sont des propriétés dépendantes d'une réponse. Il est parfois suggéré que pour quelque chose soit rouge il faut qu'une personne ayant une vision normale la perçoive comme étant rouge, ou la perçoive comme étant similaire au feu de machine, par exemple. On pourrait proposer, de la même façon, que pour qu'un acte soit mauvais il faut que les personnes ayant une psychologie normale aient tendance à désapprouver celui-ci. Une telle vision a été proposée par Bruce Brower (1993). De ce type de point de vue, les propriétés morales sont d'une certaine manière des relations psychologiques entre des types d'actions et la psychologie humaine. Dans une telle optique, le fait que quelque chose ait une propriété morale dépend de réactions psychologiques humaines contingentes.

    Il existe des points de vue relativistes et non relativistes de ce type. Jesse Prinz (2007) offre une vision relativiste, selon laquelle le fait qu'une action soit mauvaise par rapport une personne donnée dépend de la tendance de cette personne à désapprouver. Justin D'Arms et Daniel Jacobson (2006) proposent une version non relativiste. D'après eux, tout comme le fait que certains aliments soient dégoûtants en fonction de la tendance humaine
    de réagir à ces aliments avec dégoût, le fait que certaines actions sont mauvaises pourrait être fonction de la tendance humaine à réagir avec désapprobation.

    L'objection selon laquelle le naturalisme ne peut rendre compte de la normativité du jugement moral.

    La dernière objection dont je vais parler est que le naturalisme moral ne peut pas rendre compte pour la normativité du jugement moral. Cette objection se retrouve dans des travaux récents de Derek Parfit (2011), mais elle peut peut-être être considérée comme l'idée sous-jacente de tous les arguments que nous avons discuté jusqu'à présent. Pourquoi l'écart entre ce qui est et ce qui doit être semble-t-il avoir plus d'importance que le fossé entre la physique et la biologie ? Peut-être parce que "les jugements de valeurs" sont normatifs alors que les jugements biologiques sont des jugements descriptifs ordinaires tout comme les revendications physiques sont des jugements descriptifs ordinaires. [...] Peut-être, alors, que la raison sous-jacente pour laquelle de nombreux philosophes pensent que le naturalisme moral n'est pas plausible est qu'ils pensent que le naturalisme moral ne peut rendre compte de manière plausible de la normativité du jugement moral.

    Dans un article très influent, "Internal and External Reasons", Bernard Williams (1981) a soulevé des doutes sur la normativité de la moralité. Pour comprendre ces doutes, nous devons d'abord comprendre la thèse de Williams selon laquelle il n'y a que des "raisons internes", raisons fondées sur les motivations subjectives des agents. Selon Williams, on n'a de raison de faire quelque chose que si l'on peut être motivé à le faire en raison d'un raisonnement solide prenant en compte ses motivations existantes et ses croyances non-normatives. Pour étayer ce point de vue, Williams a fait valoir ce qui suit :

    (1) Un fait F est une raison pour quelqu'un de faire quelque chose uniquement si ce fait peut être la raison pour laquelle la personne a fait la chose - seulement si elle peut être la raison pour laquelle la personne fait la chose.

    (2) Si un fait F peut être la raison pour laquelle une personne fait quelque chose, alors il est nécessaire que la personne puisse être amenée à faire la chose en réfléchissant sur F, étant donné ses
    motivations, en supposant du moins qu'elle avait des croyances non-normatives précises.

    (3) Par conséquent, un fait F est une raison pour une personne de faire quelque chose uniquement si ses motivations existantes sont telles que la personne pourrait être amenée à faire la chose par réflexion sur F, en supposant qu'elle avait des croyances non-normatives exactes.

    Comme le dit Williams, il n'existe que des "raisons internes". […]

    Conclusion : Variétés du naturalisme moral.

    Compte tenu de notre examen des quatre arguments anti-naturaliste et anti-réaliste, nous pouvons maintenant décrire les variétés de naturalisme moral. Les théories peuvent être considérées sur deux dimensions, la dimension métaphysique et épistémologique, et la
    dimension de la motivation et de la normativité.

    Sur la première dimension, on peut distinguer trois types de théorie. Il y a le naturalisme non réductionniste. Dans une telle optique, les propriétés morales sont des propriétés naturelles. Pourtant, il pourrait ne pas être possible de les représenter dans une terminologie non morale. Nicholas Sturgeon a proposé un point de vue de ce genre. Il existe également un naturalisme réductionniste de la variété non-analytique. Dans une telle optique, chaque propriété morale M est identique à certaines propriété naturelle N, mais ces revendications d'identité ne sont pas des vérités analytiques ou conceptuelles.

    Ma propre vision centrée sur la société est une sorte de naturalisme réductionniste non analytique. Et enfin, il y a le naturalisme réductionniste de la variété analytique. Dans une telle perspective, chaque la propriété morale M est identique à une certaine propriété naturelle N et les affirmations véridiques de celle-ci forme sont des vérités analytiques ou conceptuelles. Frank Jackson (1998) a récemment fait défendu un tel point de vue.

    Pour en venir à la deuxième dimension, celle de la normativité et de la motivation morale, on trouve aussi trois variétés de naturalisme. Tout d'abord, il y a le naturalisme internaliste. Selon ce point de vue, les propriétés morales dépendent de la réponse, de sorte que, nécessairement, les personnes ayant des réactions normales sont motivées de manière appropriée. Ce naturalisme est réductionniste, et il peut être analytique ou non analytique.

    Le second est le naturalisme externaliste simple. Dans cette optique, il n'y a que le fait contingent que les personnes ayant des réactions normales sont motivées de manière appropriée par leurs croyances morales. Ce point de vue pourrait être combiné avec l'un des trois points de vue métaphysiques: la vue non réductionniste ou l'une des deux vues réductionnistes.

    Enfin, il y a le naturalisme externaliste avec le compte rendu de la normativité basé sur les normes. Selon ce point de vue, il s'agit simplement d'un fait contingent que les personnes ayant des réactions normales sont motivés par leurs convictions morales, mais la normativité s'explique autrement, sur la base que les faits normatifs sont des faits pertinents sur les solutions aux problèmes de gouvernance normative. Une telle vision pourrait être combinée avec l'une ou l'autre sorte de naturalisme, la variété analytique ou non-analytique. J'ai moi-même proposé que cette approche serait plus compréhensible en étant une sorte de naturalisme réductionniste non-analytique.

    Nous aimerions évidemment savoir où se trouve la vérité. En ce qui me concerne, je ne peux accepter aucune forme d'anti-réalisme. Il y a sûrement des faits moraux. Il y a des prétentions morales qui ne peuvent être niées de manière plausible. Et nos convictions morales sont certainement des croyances. Je ne peux pas penser autrement. Je suis donc conduit à un réalisme moral.

    Mais si nous devons être réalistes et si nous devons expliquer comment les faits moraux s'inscrivent dans une vision matérialiste du monde, nous devons être des naturalistes moraux. La question est bien sûr de savoir si le naturalisme est finalement défendable, et si oui, quelle variété de naturalisme est la plus prometteuse ?

    Mon propre jugement est que la vision la plus plausible est une sorte de naturalisme réductionniste non-analytique. Si le naturalisme est vrai, ce n'est certainement pas un naturalisme analytique ou une vérité conceptuelle. Mais une théorie métaéthique adéquate doit rendre compte de ce en quoi consiste la normativité, elle doit donc être réductionniste. Et compte tenu de l'invraisemblance de l'internalisme du jugement moral, notre position doit être une forme d'externalisme, mais qui fournit un compte rendu substantiel de la normativité. Ainsi, pour fournir une explication de la nature de la moralité et de la nature de la normativité, nous devons trouver une théorie réductionniste plausible, même si cette théorie ne peut être raisonnablement considérée comme une vérité analytique ou conceptuelle. Je ne connais pas d'alternative à la combinaison de téléologie pluraliste standardisée que j'ai proposée. Ceci explique très brièvement pourquoi j'occupe la position qui est la mienne aujourd'hui."
    -David Copp, "Varieties of Moral Naturalism", Filosofia Unisinos, 13 (2-supplement):280-295, octobre 2012.




    _________________
    « La question n’est pas de constater que les gens vivent plus ou moins pauvrement, mais toujours d’une manière qui leur échappe. »
    -Guy Debord, Critique de la séparation (1961).


    Contenu sponsorisé

    David Copp, Varieties of Moral Naturalism Empty Re: David Copp, Varieties of Moral Naturalism

    Message par Contenu sponsorisé


      La date/heure actuelle est Sam 23 Jan - 2:30