L'Académie nouvelle

Vous souhaitez réagir à ce message ? Créez un compte en quelques clics ou connectez-vous pour continuer.
L'Académie nouvelle

Forum d'archivage politique et scientifique


    Charlotta Carlström, BDSM, Interaction Rituals and Open Bodies

    Johnathan R. Razorback
    Johnathan R. Razorback
    Admin

    Messages : 7256
    Date d'inscription : 12/08/2013
    Localisation : France

    Charlotta Carlström, BDSM, Interaction Rituals and Open Bodies Empty Charlotta Carlström, BDSM, Interaction Rituals and Open Bodies

    Message par Johnathan R. Razorback le Sam 2 Mai - 11:28

    https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s12119-017-9461-7

    In this article, based on ethnographic fieldwork in BDSM communities in Sweden, I explore the bodily and ritual aspects of Bondage and Discipline, Dominance and Submission, Sadism and Masochism (BDSM). The abbreviation BDSM seeks to describe a variety of (sexual) behaviours including an implicit or explicit erotic power exchange. According to many practitioners, a central part in BDSM is the creation of common rituals, where the group dynamics are particularly significant (Carlström 2015; Beckmann 2009). Turner (1973) defines a ritual as a ‘stereotyped sequence of activities involving gestures, words, and objects, performed in a sequestered place, and designed to influence preternatural entities of forces on behalf of the actor’s goals and interest’ (p. 1100). Based on field notes from BDSM sessions involving humiliation, the article aims to explore ritual aspects of this form of practices. Humiliation means that a person is exposed to, or forced to perform acts that are not necessarily physically dangerous, but taboo or uncomfortable. Drawing on Douglas (1966/2005) and Collins’ (2005) theories of interaction rituals, I explore different meanings and motives to the sessions, and how voluntary humiliation can be orchestrated. Douglas and Collins both show that the ritual concept can be extended, and be applicable to various forms of behaviour also in secular communities. To understand the practitioner’s attitudes to body fluids and taboos in the practices, I turn to Bakhtin’s theory of the grotesque body (1965/1984).
    There are few studies to date highlighting the ritual aspects of BDSM. Myers (1983) notes that the individual and group dynamics of rites de passage—rituals and initiatory practices in traditional non-Western cultures—are strikingly similar to those of the BDSM community. Mains (1984/2002) explores the spiritual, sexual, emotional and cultural aspects of the gay male leather community. He also links the leather and sadomasochistic experiences to the tribal rites of indigenous societies around the world and highlights the intimacy, intensity and altered states of consciousness in the plays. Role-playing, Mains argues, often plays on the themes of buried or frustrated emotions and can function as an enabler to heal emotional wounds. Beckmann (2009, p. 183) reflects on the link between spirituality and BDSM and points out:
    The lack of areas of spirituality that were formerly satisfied by religious rituals left a void in Western consumer societies. The filling of this void might be one of the broader social meanings that the increased motivation to engage in the ‘bodily practice’ of consensual ‘SM’ in contemporary consumer culture signals.
    In line with Beckmann, Carlström (2016) analyses the relations between BDSM fantasies, spirituality and rituals, concluding that participating in BDSM could serve the same purpose as a religious ritual, and enable meaning and a sense of security and belonging for the practitioners. Another researcher who describes the spiritual dimension of BDSM is Norman (1991). In particular, he explores the ability of BDSM to affect certain states of consciousness and likens the practice to sexual rituals of the Eastern tantric religious tradition. Comfort (1978) argues that sadomasochistic activities have similarities with magical rites in their ability to expand participants’ self-awareness. According to Rubin (2004), SM practices involve the kinds of transformational experiences more often associated with spiritual disciplines. Sagarin et al. (2015) liken BDSM with another type of intense physical activity: extreme rituals (e.g., body piercing, firewalking). They suggest that as with BDSM, extreme rituals facilitate escape from the self, given the trances that some rituals are reported to produce. Sagarin, Lee and Klemen conclude that ‘people appear to pursue BDSM and extreme rituals, in part, for similar reasons, and they appear to anticipate similar benefits from both’ (p. 51). Westerfelhaus (2007) describes that BDSM rituals can be viewed as forms to release individual fantasies and transform them into collective emotional energy and myths. According to Westerfelhaus, the rituals can also function as ways to create collective feelings and experiences of ecstasy and euphoria.
    Understandings of humiliation in BDSM are still a void in the prior scholarship. In this study, BDSM humiliation is explored as an interaction ritual, which includes interconnecting group-dynamic feelings, healing effects, affection and community.
    Methods
    In 2012 and 2013, ethnographic fieldwork was conducted within several BDSM communities in Sweden. I participated in different forms of meetings, such as workshops, pub evenings and clubs. I became a member of Darkside, the largest Swedish BDSM network on the Internet with approximately 170,000 members (Carlström 2016), where I advertised my research project. I also advertised in a sex shop and contacted non-profit organisations working with sexual issues and for the rights of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender people, and informed them about the research project. During the observation, I made ‘mental notes’ (cf. O’Connell Davidson and Layder 1994) of environments, events and characters. When it was possible, I recorded short phrases or keywords. Immediately after the observation I wrote a detailed field note of what had happened during the observation, including descriptions of events and persons as well as conversations with and between people. Most of the field notes were written from memory immediately after the observation. The thematic analysis, as described by Hammersley and Atkinson (1983), is closest to my analysis work. Different categories and components were identified in the material and were analysed in relation to theoretical perspectives and previous research. Throughout the entire project, ethical considerations played a central role. Informed consent was obtained from all individual participants included in the study. The project follows the Swedish Research Council’s ethical guidelines (Codex 2012) and was reviewed by the Regional Ethical Review Board.
    Footnote
    1
    Theoretical Framework
    Interaction Rituals
    Ritual is more to society than words are to thought (Douglas 1966/2005, p. 77).
    Important transitions in individuals’ lives have always been associated with rituals, and in traditional cultures, these were predetermined and defined in relation to age and gender, so-called rites de passage; that is, passages which are often characterised by collective ritual ceremonies (Douglas 1966/2005). Under conditions of modernity, such collective ceremonies are less apparent and it has become the individuals’ own responsibility to manage life changes (Giddens 1991). Both Douglas and Collins are influenced by Durkheim’s (1912/2001) sociology of religion, and his approach to the concepts of sacred and secular. Douglas believes that there are no differences in rituals between what she refers to as ‘modern people’ and ‘primitive cultures’, or between religious and prophetic rituals, since they fulfil the same important functions by offering a framework for daily symbolic action. She points out: ‘If ritual is suppressed in one form it crops up in others, more strongly the more intense the social interaction’ (Douglas 1966/2005, p. 77). Ritualistic behaviour expresses and recognises people’s shared values while generating the necessary emotions to keep people in their assigned roles. According to Collins (2005), rituals can be seen as specific behaviour in relation to the sacred. By using the concept of ‘interaction rituals’, Collins (2005, pp. 48–49) widens the concept of ritual to reach outside a religious context. He defines an interaction ritual as:
    Two or more people are physically assembled in the same place, so that they affect each other by their bodily presence, whether it is in the foreground of their conscious attention or not.
    These are boundaries to outsiders so that participants have a sense of who is taking part and who are excluded.
    People focus their attention upon a common object or activity, and by communicating this focus to each other become mutually aware of each other’s focus of attention.
    They share a common mood or emotional experience.
    The interaction ritual has four main outcomes. The participants have the experience of:
    Group solidarity.
    Emotional energy in the individual: a feeling of confidence, strength and enthusiasm.
    Symbols that represent the group: ‘the sacred objects’.
    Feelings of morality: the sense of rightness in adhering to the group, respecting its symbols and defending both against transgressors.
    The rituals function to handle the symbols, which, according to anthropologist Turner (1969), constitute the smallest units in a ritual activity. The symbols can be objects, activities, words, relationships, events, gestures or spatial units. They have multiple meanings and are bearers of meaning with a united function to maintain morals as well as satisfy the emotional needs of the individual (Turner 1969). Collins (2005) describes symbols as sacred objects to which rituals direct collective attention. Symbols can be both individuals and things, and they have a common agreed importance and meaning for the participants. The community within BDSM can be understood through Collins’ (2005) description of the emotional energy that arises in connection with interaction rituals. Through the strong energy generated through the common focus directed towards an object, activity or person, participants become aware of the established lines, as well as seeing who is occupying a position within the boundaries and who is outside. Collins talks about emotional energy as a connecting group dynamic feeling. High emotional energy is characterised by pride and commitment to the group. The emotional energy also has a moral sentiment and functions to control the members. It includes feelings of what is right and wrong, moral and immoral.
    Open Bodies and Taboo Plays
    The most barbarous or bizarre rituals and the strangest myths translate some human need, some aspect of life, whether individual or social (Durkheim 1912/2001, p. 4).
    Some BDSM practices require access to each other’s bodies, where what is usually considered taboo and disgusting becomes part of the role-play. Examples are wet- and scat plays (games containing urine and faeces) and various forms of humiliation games. Most people experience for example nudity, dirt, bodily secretions and forced feeding as degrading. Unlike contexts outside of BDSM where, for example blood and urine should be avoided, body fluids are less taboo within BDSM. BDSM can thus go against the ordinary understanding of body fluids, which also Beckmann (2009) discusses in her study. She points out that in Western society, the functional body ought to be clean and hygienic, where contact with body fluids is an area surrounded by taboos.
    Bakhtin (1965/1984) distinguishes between open and closed bodies as two ways to see and understand the body. The body should be understood in both a physical sense and on a symbolic level. The closed (classical) body is perceived as restrained, beautiful and flattened. It appears to be complete and without flaws, visible wounds or defects. It does not extend beyond itself, but becomes self-sufficient. Other bodies are not necessary—the closed body harbours all that is necessary in itself. By contrast, the open body should be perceived as becoming, imperfect, incomplete and transgressive. It is an expression of the unfinished, transgressive to the community and the world. One extreme of the open body is the grotesque body (Bakhtin 1965/1984). This body’s arena is the carnival, which celebrates fattening food, intoxicating drink and sexual promiscuity in a world where the correct and bourgeois culture is turned upside down. According to Bakhtin (1965/1984, p. 317), the grotesque body is:
    (…) a body in the act of becoming. It is never finished, never completed; it is continually built, created, and builds and creates another body. Moreover, the body swallows the world and is itself swallowed by the world (…) This is why the essential role belongs to those parts of the grotesque body in which it outgrows its own self, transgressing its own body.
    Exaggeration and excess are, according to Bakhtin, distinctive features of the grotesque style. It is characterised in terms of impurity, disproportion, immediacy, and openings. The grotesque is interested in that which stands out and protrudes from the body when the prolonging parts of the body also connect with other bodies: ‘Mountains and abysses, such is the relief of the grotesque body; or speaking in architectural terms, towers and subterranean passages’ (1965/1984, p. 318). The most important facial feature of the grotesque is the mouth: ‘The grotesque face is actually reduced to the gaping mouth; the other features are only a frame encasing this wide-open bodily abyss’ (p. 317) The main elements of the grotesque body are, according to Bakhtin, the parts where the body transcends itself and goes beyond its borders, such as the stomach, breasts, genitals, mouth and buttocks:
    Eating, drinking, defecation and other elimination (sweating, blowing of the nose, sneezing), as well as copulation, pregnancy, dismemberment, swallowing up by another body - all these acts are performed on the confines of the body and the outer world, or on the confines of the old and new body. (Bakhtin, p. 317)
    The characteristic of all these bulges and gaps is that the limits between the body and the world are loosening.
    Results
    Humiliation Rituals
    This part takes its starting point in empirical examples by describing two workshops that I attended during my field studies. I analyse them by drawing on Bakhtin’s (1965/1984) theory of open and closed bodies, and Douglas’ (1966/2005) and Collins’ (2005) theory of interaction rituals. As mentioned, I am interested in different meanings and motives to voluntary humiliation, and by drawing on the two examples I explore how humiliation sessions can be staged. The examples are based on my field notes and consist of a staging where an audience is present. In the first example, I connect Bakhtin’s theory to one of the BDSM practices that I think people outside the BDSM community have the most difficulty to understand, namely humiliation, where bulges and gaps figure.
    The event takes place in a relatively small place and we are about fifty people in the audience, it’s crowded and hot. We are in a BDSM setting to participate in a workshop on humiliation.
    A woman is asked to come up to act bottom in a humiliation session. The woman is 25 years old and wearing a T-shirt, skirt and tights. First, the woman is told to keep her hands above her head and to make eye contact with everyone in the audience. The leader stands behind her. After a minute the leader pulls up the shirt so it exposes part of the woman’s breast. The leader involves the audience by saying; ‘Do you notice that she is affected? What physical expression can you see?’ Some in the audience point out that she giggles, becoming red in the face, ashamed and increased heart rate. The woman says she has looked at everyone in the audience, and the leader’s voice becomes hard: ‘Have I told you to stop? Continue!’ The woman continues to meet the audience’s eyes and the leader takes plenty of time, whispers something in the ear of the woman, holding her in a firm grip by her hair.
    After a while the leader takes hold of her T-shirt and makes a hole next to the breast that allows the breast to hang out of the hole in the shirt. Then she asks for assistance to get two plates from the bar, one full of cream, one with chocolate pudding. The woman must stand on a towel. The leader then takes her hands full and smears her, the hair, the face, the bared breast. The leader presses the chocolate and cream in her mouth until she is unable to swallow, but spits it out. Finally, she presses the chocolate and cream inside the panties between the buttocks. Afterward, the leader demands her to take a few steps back, still standing on the towel. She is then left there for the rest of the evening, without having washed off or taken on other clothing. (Field note 2013-05-15)
    There are many taboos being transgressed in the session. The woman is vulnerable and exposed in front of the audience. Her sweater is pulled down to expose her breast and parts of her body are daubed. The leader is opening up her body to the audience by forcing her to keep eye contact with everyone in the audience. The gaze connects her body with other bodies and the boundaries between her body and the audience becomes diffuse and loosened. In the session, as in Bakhtin’s grotesque body, the mouth, breast, sex and buttocks are in focus. When a hole is made in the t-shirt and one breast is lifted out, special attention is given to the ‘shoots and branches, to all that prolongs the body and links it to other bodies or to the world outside’ (Bakhtin 1965/1984, p. 317). When the chocolate is pressed into her mouth, the connections to the gaping mouth become clear. Another part is the exaggeration in the session. Bakhtin speaks of sharp prominent exaggerations as hyperboles. These are particularly striking in the images of the body in relation to food. Filling food into body openings and making the private into something public (exposure of body parts) can with Bakhtin’s words be said to signify a ‘downgrading’. In what Bakhtin calls the modern image of the individual body:
    Sexual life, eating, drinking, and defecation have radically changed their meaning: they have been transferred to the private and psychological level where their connotation becomes narrow and specific, torn away from the direct relation to the life of society and to the cosmic whole. In this new connotation they can no longer carry on their former philosophical functions (p. 321).
    In modern society, there is an increased control of emotions, bodily functions and expressiveness, and a corresponding contempt for bodily revelations, smells, fluids and sound. The sociologist Pasi Falk (1994) draws on Bakhtin’s theory when describing a historical shift, where the open body changed to become more closed. The closed body is characterised by a strong control of bodily and emotional expression. According to Bakhtin, the modern closed body:
    … presents an entirely finished, completed, strictly limited body, which is shown from the outside as something individual. That which protrudes, bulges, sprouts, or branches off (when a body transgresses its limits and a new one begins) is eliminated, hidden, or moderated. All orifices of the body are closed. Since the closed body shall not reconcile with other bodies, the surface of the body will have an important meaning as boundary (p. 320).
    There are few arenas in modern society where strong emotions are allowed. For the modern individual, this means a dynamic between both maintenance and discipline (cf. Foucault 1977), and loss of self-control. To be able to control the limit of one’s body, a control of the fluids in and out of the body is required. Despite this distance from the ‘grotesque other’, there is nevertheless a complex fascination and enchantment. This is why, according to Featherstone (2007), there is a longing after arenas where the boundaries can be exceeded, and the restraint can be released. Featherstone provides examples of places such as theatres, carnivals, circuses and exotic environments. As stated above, it becomes clear that BDSM environments can constitute such an arena for transgressive and emotional expression. It should also be emphasized that the activities become erotically charged to their participants just because they are taboo. Cohen and Taylor (1976/2002) state:
    Sex-making when legitimized within communes by reference to a free-love ethic, may lose its excitement along with its oppositional and covert status. For in a way all involvement in free areas necessitates putting ourselves at risk, it means putting a fantasy on the line, taking a chance that lifebuoys from paramount reality will not be available when required (p. 168).
    The described session was associated with strong emotions, both from the participants and from the audience. When I visited Darkside (BDSM community on the internet) the following day, the evening was described in strong words, where many have been overwhelmed by the strong experience in a positive way and gave five of five possible stars. So did the woman who had participated in the session herself.
    In the next field note, the collective intimacy and vulnerability are central. The participant explains that hir has long been working on hir gender identity and recently became more open as transsexual. The field note is from a workshop on humiliation with about fifty persons in the audience:
    The session begins with the workshop leader sitting on a couch with the participant. She asks what relationship the participant has to degradation games and asks hir to tell. Meanwhile, she caresses gently the participant’s neck and hir hands. Then she takes off the participant’s shawl and uses the long-sleeved shirt to tie hir arms; she binds one arm on hir back and the other over hir chest. She binds the shawl tight around the body, making the body fixed in one position. The leader puts down the participant on the back of the floor. She sits across hir body, takes out some blackboard pens and looks into hir eyes and says ‘She?’ At the same time she writes the word on hir breasts. The participant shakes hir head and says ‘No’. The leader says ‘He?’ And writes the word at the same time. Hir answers ‘No’ and still shakes hir head. This continues, the words are written on the upper body over and over. Finally, it is not possible to read the words because it has been overwritten so many times. The crowd is cramped and I feel the atmosphere as very emotional. The leader brings up the pen again and says ‘It?’ And the participant nods and answers with great relief, yes. The ritual is repeated over and over again. Finally, there is a single large IT on the upper body of the participant and the session is over. Hir is laid on the side, hir mouth acts as a pencil holder and hir body as a footstool to the leader, who turns to the audience and summarises the workshop. (Field note 2013-05-15)
    Also in this staging, the body is in focus. In order to understand the ritualisation that takes place, I return to Collins’ (2005) theory of interaction rituals. Both the described BDSM sessions meet the criteria for an interaction ritual. The collective emotional charge and the common focus are central in the two described sessions. It becomes clear that they have an important significance for the community. There are established lines between the inside and outside of the interaction rituals. The people who participate, and the people in the audience, know that it is a show where people have volunteered and agreed to what is happening. If a person came from outside, not knowing that BDSM was practiced, the interpretation of the situation would probably be completely different than the meaning which is given by the ‘initiated’. There is a physical closeness created between the participants and a unified focus on the leader and the participant. The audience direct undivided attention to the participant’s emotional and physical reactions. There is thus a common attention focus.
    Both examples show a strong emotional experience in connection with the sessions. This experience can be deduced from what Collins (2005) calls emotional energy, a connecting group dynamic feeling. He likens emotional energy to the psychological concept ‘driving force’; it is distinguished from the former by a social orientation, where emotional energy is characterised by pride and commitment to the group. Collins distinguishes between long-term and short-term emotions. The former can be described as an emotion of mind where concern for the individual’s sense of self, caring for others, interacting and community are important. In an interaction ritual, participants enter the rite with a set of emotions. According to Collins, these are short-term and temporary. The outcome or the effect of a ritual is long-term emotions, such as belonging, group dynamics and community. He gives funerals as an example, where the short-lived emotions consist of sadness and lack, but the outcomes of the funeral are feelings of group community with other funeral participants.
    The emotional energy of a BDSM session can be described as follows: The initial feelings described by the participants are desire, anticipation and excitement. For example, in the first workshop described, the audience point out that the participant giggles, becomes red in the face, ashamed and has an increased heart rate. These are the feelings that Collins sees as short-lived. During the ritual, participants have a group community and a common focus, which was evident in the examples. The initial individual feelings change to shared group-dynamic feelings. After the session, feelings of joining, love, affection, fellowship and vulnerability are described. Such emotions, according to Collins, are long lasting. Collins (2005, p. 149) raises the question: ‘What determines which interactional rituals an individual will join rather than some other rituals, and why some individuals develop more of a taste for ritual solidarity than other persons?’ He argues that individuals who have taken part in successful interaction rituals develop a taste for more ritual solidarity and are motivated to repeat the practice. When conducting field research on professional dominatrices, Lindemann (2011) describes an unexpected discourse that emerged: ‘respondents repeatedly characterized themselves as “therapists”, speaking about their work as a form of psychological treatment for their clients’ (p. 151). She analyses BDSM as a device for confronting past trauma, and a psychological reprieve from the pressures of postmodern life. She points out that in BDSM, the practitioners are able to express these desires that have historically been conceptualised as problematic and pathological, in a context that is free from social judgment or reverberations (see also Barker et al. 2007).
    Conclusions
    I have analysed BDSM as an arena where bodies are allowed (or required) to be what Bakhtin calls open, in a society where the closed body is elevated to an ideal. A conclusion drawn from the fieldwork is that practicing BDSM is largely about dedication, transgression and emotional expressiveness. The practice can enable an exploration of areas that usually are perceived as taboo. The BDSM sessions meet the criteria for what Collins calls ‘interaction rituals’ and creates strong interconnecting group-dynamic feelings and emotional energy in forms of healing, love, affection, vulnerability and membership symbols, which can imply both meaning and motive for a BDSM practice. Drawing on Douglas and Collins, the article shows that BDSM rituals resemble religious rituals and serve the same purposes for the participants. Since the ritual aspect of BDSM sessions can be understood as an enabler of expressions and emotional energy this conclusion can provide a basis to understand why people seek out this kind of communities. BDSM becomes a free zone in which bodies are allowed to be open in a Bakhtinian sense, that is, transgressive and beyond control.

    -Charlotta Carlström, "BDSM, Interaction Rituals and Open Bodies", Sexuality & Culture, 22, 209–219 (2018). https://doi.org/10.1007/s12119-017-9461-7



    _________________
    « La racine de toute doctrine erronée se trouve dans une erreur philosophique. [...] Le rôle des penseurs vrais, mais aussi une tâche de tout homme libre, est de comprendre les possibles conséquences de chaque principe ou idée, de chaque décision avant qu'elle se change en action, afin d'exclure aussi bien ses conséquences nuisibles que la possibilité de tromperie. »
    -Jacob Sher, Avertissement contre le socialisme, Introduction à « Tableaux de l'avenir social-démocrate » d'Eugen Richter, avril 1998.

    Johnathan R. Razorback
    Johnathan R. Razorback
    Admin

    Messages : 7256
    Date d'inscription : 12/08/2013
    Localisation : France

    Charlotta Carlström, BDSM, Interaction Rituals and Open Bodies Empty Re: Charlotta Carlström, BDSM, Interaction Rituals and Open Bodies

    Message par Johnathan R. Razorback le Sam 2 Mai - 17:52

    "Dans cet article, basé sur un travail ethnographique de terrain dans les communautés BDSM en Suède, j'explore les aspects corporels et rituels du Bondage et de la Discipline, de la Domination et de la Soumission, du Sadisme et du Masochisme (BDSM). L'abréviation BDSM cherche à décrire une variété de comportements (sexuels), incluant un échange -implicite ou explicite- de pouvoir à caractère érotique. Selon de nombreux praticiens, une partie centrale du BDSM est la création de rituels communs, dans lesquels la dynamique de groupe est particulièrement importante. Turner (1973) définit un rituel comme une "séquence stéréotypée d'activités impliquant des gestes, des mots et des objets, exécutée dans un lieu clos et conçue pour influencer des entités de forces préternaturelles au nom des objectifs et des intérêts de l'acteur" (p. 1100). Basé sur des notes de terrain de sessions BDSM comportant des humiliations, l'article vise à explorer les aspects rituels de ces pratiques. L'humiliation signifie qu'une personne est exposée ou forcée à exécuter des actes qui ne sont pas nécessairement dangereux physiquement, mais qui sont tabous ou inconfortables. En m'appuyant sur les théories de Douglas (1966/2005) et de Collins (2005) sur les rituels d'interaction, j'explore les différentes significations et motivations des séances et la manière dont l'humiliation volontaire peut être orchestrée. Douglas et Collins montrent tous deux que le concept de rituel peut être étendu et s'appliquer à diverses formes de comportement, y compris dans les communautés laïques. Pour comprendre l'attitude du praticien face aux fluides corporels et aux tabous des pratiques, je me tourne vers la théorie du corps grotesque de Bakhtine (1965/1984).

    Il existe peu d'études à ce jour mettant en évidence les aspects rituels du BDSM. Myers (1983) note que les dynamiques -individuelles et collectives- des rites de passage - rituels et pratiques initiatiques dans les cultures traditionnelles non occidentales - sont étonnamment similaires à celles de la communauté BDSM. Mains (1984/2002) explore les aspects spirituels, sexuels, émotionnels et culturels de la communauté gay masculine "du cuir". Il établit également un lien entre les expériences "cuir" et sadomasochistes et les rites tribaux des sociétés indigènes du monde entier et met en évidence l'intimité, l'intensité et les états de conscience altérés dans les jeux. Les jeux de rôle, selon Mains, jouent souvent sur les thèmes des émotions enfouies ou frustrées et peuvent servir à guérir les blessures émotionnelles. Beckmann (2009, p. 183) réfléchit sur le lien entre la spiritualité et le BDSM et souligne :

    Le recul des éléments de spiritualité autrefois satisfaits par les rituels religieux a laissé un vide dans les sociétés de consommation occidentales. Le désir de combler ce vide pourrait être l'une des significations sociales plus larges que signale la motivation accrue à s'engager de nos jours dans les "pratiques corporelles" BDSM.

    En accord avec Beckmann, Carlström (2016) analyse les relations entre les fantasmes, la spiritualité et les rituels BDSM, concluant que la participation au BDSM pourrait servir le même but qu'un rituel religieux, et permettre aux pratiquants de trouver un sens et un sentiment de sécurité et d'appartenance. Un autre chercheur qui décrit la dimension spirituelle du BDSM est Norman (1991). Il explore en particulier la capacité du BDSM à affecter certains états de conscience et compare cette pratique aux rituels sexuels de la tradition religieuse tantrique orientale. Comfort (1978) soutient que les activités sadomasochistes ont des similarités avec les rites magiques dans leur capacité à élargir la conscience de soi des participants. Selon Rubin (2004), les pratiques de SM impliquent le type d'expériences de transformation de soi le plus souvent associées aux disciplines spirituelles. Sagarin et al. (2015) comparent le BDSM à un autre type d'activité physique intense : les rituels extrêmes (par exemple, le perçage du corps, la marche sur le feu). Ils suggèrent que comme pour le BDSM, les rituels extrêmes facilitent l'évasion du soi, étant donné les transes que certains rituels produiraient. Sagarin, Lee et Klemen concluent que "les gens semblent poursuivre le BDSM et les rituels extrêmes, en partie, pour des raisons similaires, et ils semblent anticiper des bénéfices similaires dans les deux cas" (p. 51). Westerfelhaus (2007) explique que les rituels BDSM peuvent être considérés comme des formes permettant de libérer les fantasmes individuels et de les transformer en énergie émotionnelle collective et en mythes. Selon Westerfelhaus, les rituels peuvent également fonctionner comme des moyens de créer des sentiments et des expériences collectives d'extase et d'euphorie.

    La compréhension de l'humiliation dans le cadre du BDSM demeure une lacune de la recherche universitaire antérieure. Dans cette étude, l'humiliation dans le BDSM est explorée comme un rituel d'interaction, qui inclut l'interconnexion des sentiments dynamiques de groupe, les effets de guérison, l'affection et la communauté.

    En 2012 et 2013, un travail ethnographique de terrain a été mené au sein de plusieurs communautés BDSM en Suède. J'ai participé à différentes formes de rencontres, comme des ateliers, des soirées au pub et dans des clubs. Je suis devenue membre de Darkside, le plus grand réseau BDSM suédois sur Internet avec environ 170 000 membres (Carlström 2016), où j'ai fait de la publicité pour mon projet de recherche. J'ai également fait de la publicité dans un sex shop et j'ai contacté des organisations à but non lucratif travaillant sur les questions sexuelles et pour les droits des lesbiennes, des gays, des bisexuels et des transsexuels, et je les ai informés du projet de recherche. Pendant l'observation, j'ai pris des "notes mentales" (cf. O'Connell Davidson et Layder 1994) sur les environnements, les événements et les personnes. Lorsque c'était possible, j'ai enregistré de courtes phrases ou des mots-clés. Immédiatement après l'observation, j'ai rédigé une note de terrain détaillée sur ce qui s'était passé pendant l'observation, y compris des descriptions d'événements et de personnes ainsi que des conversations avec et entre les personnes. La plupart des notes de terrain ont été rédigées de mémoire immédiatement après l'observation. L'analyse thématique, telle que décrite par Hammersley et Atkinson (1983), est la plus proche de mon travail d'analyse. Différentes catégories et composantes ont été identifiées dans le matériel et ont été analysées par rapport aux perspectives théoriques et aux recherches antérieures. Tout au long du projet, les considérations éthiques ont joué un rôle central. Le consentement éclairé a été obtenu de tous les participants individuels inclus dans l'étude. Le projet suit les directives éthiques du Conseil suédois de la recherche (Codex 2012) et a été examiné par le Conseil régional d'examen éthique.

    Cadre théorique. Les Rituels d'interactions.

    "Le rituel est encore plus important pour la société que les mots ne le sont pour la pensée" (Douglas 1966/2005, p. 77).

    Les transitions importantes dans la vie des individus ont toujours été associées à des rituels, et dans les cultures traditionnelles, ceux-ci étaient prédéterminés et définis en fonction de l'âge et du sexe ; on parle de rites de passage ; c'est-à-dire des passages qui sont souvent caractérisés par des cérémonies rituelles collectives (Douglas 1966/2005). Dans les conditions de la modernité, ces cérémonies collectives sont moins apparentes et il est devenu de la responsabilité des individus de gérer eux-mêmes leurs changements de vie (Giddens 1991). Douglas et Collins sont tous deux influencés par la sociologie de la religion de Durkheim et son approche des concepts de sacré et de laïcité. Douglas estime qu'il n'y a pas de différences dans les rituels entre ce qu'elle appelle les "peuples modernes" et les "cultures primitives", ou entre les rituels religieux et prophétiques, puisqu'ils remplissent les mêmes fonctions importantes en offrant un cadre pour l'action symbolique quotidienne. Elle souligne que si un rituel est supprimé sous une forme, il réapparaît sous une autre, et plus l'interaction sociale est intense, plus elle est réprimée" (Douglas 1966/2005, p. 77). Le comportement rituel exprime et reconnaît les valeurs communes des gens tout en générant les émotions nécessaires pour que les gens restent dans le rôle qui leur est assigné. Selon Collins (2005), les rituels peuvent être considérés comme un comportement spécifique par rapport au sacré. En utilisant le concept de "rituels d'interaction", Collins (2005, pp. 48-49) élargit le concept de rituel pour le faire sortir du contexte religieux. Il définit un rituel d'interaction comme suit :

    -Deux ou plusieurs personnes sont physiquement assemblées dans un même lieu, de sorte qu'elles s'influencent mutuellement par leur présence corporelle, que ce fait soit ou non au premier plan de leur attention consciente.

    -Il existe des limites pour les personnes extérieures, afin que les participants aient sachent qui participent et qui est excluent.

    -Les gens concentrent leur attention sur un objet ou une activité commune, et en se communiquant cette attention, ils deviennent mutuellement conscients de l'attention qu'ils portent les uns aux autres.

    -Ils partagent une humeur ou une expérience émotionnelle commune.

    Le rituel d'interaction a quatre résultats principaux. Les participants font l'expérience de :

    -La solidarité de groupe.

    -L'énergie émotionnelle à l'échelle l'individu : un sentiment de confiance, de force et d'enthousiasme.

    -Symboles qui représentent le groupe : "les objets sacrés".

    -Sentiments de moralité : le sentiment de justesse dans l'adhésion au groupe, le respect de ses symboles et la défense des uns et des autres contre les transgresseurs.

    Les rituels servent à manipuler les symboles qui, selon l'anthropologue Turner (1969), constituent les plus petites unités d'une activité rituelle. Les symboles peuvent être des objets, des activités, des mots, des relations, des événements, des gestes ou des unités spatiales. Ils ont des significations multiples et sont porteurs de sens avec une fonction unifiée pour maintenir la morale ainsi que pour satisfaire les besoins émotionnels de l'individu (Turner 1969). Collins (2005) décrit les symboles comme des objets sacrés vers lesquels les rituels dirigent l'attention collective. Les symboles peuvent être à la fois des individus et des choses, et ils ont une importance et une signification communes et convenues pour les participants. La communauté du BDSM peut être comprise à travers la description de Collins (2005) de l'énergie émotionnelle qui se dégage en relation avec les rituels d'interaction. Grâce à la forte énergie générée par la focalisation commune dirigée vers un objet, une activité ou une personne, les participants prennent conscience des lignes établies, ainsi que de voir qui occupe une position à l'intérieur des limites et qui est à l'extérieur. Collins parle de l'énergie émotionnelle comme d'un sentiment de dynamique de groupe. Une grande énergie émotionnelle se caractérise par la fierté et l'engagement envers le groupe. L'énergie émotionnelle a également un sentiment moral et sert à contrôler les membres. Elle comprend des sentiments de ce qui est bien et mal, moral et immoral.

    L'ouverture des corps et le jeux avec les tabous.

    "Les rituels les plus barbares ou bizarres et les mythes les plus étranges traduisent un besoin humain, un aspect de la vie, qu'il soit individuel ou social." (Durkheim, 1912).

    Certaines pratiques BDSM nécessitent l'accès au corps de l'autre, où ce qui est généralement considéré comme tabou et dégoûtant devient une partie du jeu de rôle. On peut citer comme exemples les jeux contenant de l'urine et des excréments, et diverses formes de jeux d'humiliation. La plupart des gens considèrent par exemple la nudité, la saleté, les sécrétions corporelles et l'alimentation forcée comme dégradantes. Contrairement aux contextes hors BDSM où, par exemple, le sang et l'urine doivent être évités, les fluides corporels sont moins tabous au sein de la BDSM. Le BDSM peut donc aller à l'encontre de la signification ordinaire des fluides corporels, ce dont parle également Beckmann (2009) dans son étude. Elle souligne que dans la société occidentale, le corps fonctionnel doit être propre et hygiénique, où le contact avec les fluides corporels est une zone entourée de tabous.

    Bakhtine (1965/1984) distingue les corps ouverts et fermés comme deux façons de voir et de comprendre le corps. Le corps doit être compris ici à la fois dans un sens physique et sur un plan symbolique. Le corps fermé (classique) est perçu comme restreint, beau et aplati. Il semble être complet et sans défaut, sans blessure visible ni imperfection. Il ne s'étend pas au-delà de lui-même, mais devient autosuffisant. Les autres corps ne sont pas nécessaires - le corps fermé abrite tout ce qui est nécessaire en soi. En revanche, le corps ouvert doit être perçu comme en devenir, imparfait, incomplet et transgressif. Il est l'expression de l'inachevé, transgressif pour la communauté et le monde. Un des extrêmes du corps ouvert est le corps grotesque (Bakhtin 1965/1984). L'arène de ce corps est le carnaval, qui célèbre la nourriture grasse, la boisson enivrante et la promiscuité sexuelle dans un monde où la culture correcte et bourgeoise est bouleversée. Selon Bakhtin (1965/1984, p. 317), le corps grotesque est :

    (…) a body in the act of becoming. It is never finished, never completed; it is continually built, created, and builds and creates another body. Moreover, the body swallows the world and is itself swallowed by the world (…) This is why the essential role belongs to those parts of the grotesque body in which it outgrows its own self, transgressing its own body.

    L'exagération et l'excès sont, selon Bakhtine, les traits distinctifs du style grotesque. Il se caractérise en termes d'impureté, de disproportion, d'immédiateté et d'ouvertures. Le grotesque s'intéresse à ce qui se détache et dépasse du corps lorsque les parties prolongées du corps se relient également à d'autres corps : "Montagnes et abîmes, tel est le relief du corps grotesque ; ou, en termes d'architecture, tours et passages souterrains" (1965/1984, p. 318). La caractéristique faciale la plus importante du grotesque est la bouche : "Le visage grotesque est en fait réduit à la bouche béante ; les autres caractéristiques ne sont qu'un cadre renfermant cet abîme corporel largement ouvert" (p. 317). Les principaux éléments du corps grotesque sont, selon Bakhtine, les parties où le corps se transcende et dépasse ses frontières, comme le ventre, les seins, les organes génitaux, la bouche et les fesses :

    Manger, boire, déféquer et autres éliminations (transpiration, mouchage, éternuements), ainsi que la copulation, la grossesse, le démembrement, la déglutition par un autre corps - tous ces actes sont accomplis aux confins du corps et du monde extérieur, ou aux confins de l'ancien et du nouveau corps. (Bakhtin, p. 317)

    La caractéristique de tous ces gonflements et écarts est que les limites entre le corps et le monde se relâchent.

    Rituels d'humiliation.

    Cette partie prend son point de départ dans des exemples empiriques en décrivant deux ateliers auxquels j'ai participé pendant mes études sur le terrain. Je les analyse en m'appuyant sur la théorie des corps ouverts et fermés de Bakhtine (1965/1984), et sur la théorie des rituels d'interaction de Douglas (1966/2005) et Collins (2005). Comme mentionné, je m'intéresse aux différentes significations et motivations de l'humiliation volontaire, et en m'appuyant sur ces deux exemples, j'explore la manière dont les séances d'humiliation peuvent être mises en scène. Les exemples sont basés sur mes notes de terrain et consistent en une mise en scène où un public est présent. Dans le premier exemple, je relie la théorie de Bakhtin à l'une des pratiques BDSM qui, selon moi, est la plus difficile à comprendre pour les personnes extérieures à la communauté BDSM, à savoir l'humiliation […]

    L'événement se déroule dans un lieu relativement petit et nous sommes une cinquantaine de personnes dans le public, c'est bondé et il fait chaud. Nous sommes dans un cadre BDSM pour participer à un atelier sur l'humiliation.

    Une femme est invitée à venir agir en bas lors d'une séance d'humiliation. La femme a 25 ans et porte un T-shirt, une jupe et des collants. On lui demande d'abord de garder les mains au-dessus de la tête et de regarder dans les yeux tous les spectateurs. La chef de file se tient derrière elle. Au bout d'une minute, la meneuse soulève le t-shirt pour exposer une partie de la poitrine de la femme. Le chef de file fait participer le public en disant : "Remarquez-vous qu'elle est affectée ? Quelle expression physique pouvez-vous voir ?" Certains dans le public font remarquer qu'elle rit, devient rouge au visage, honteuse et que son rythme cardiaque augmente. La femme dit qu'elle a regardé tout le monde dans le public, et la voix de la meneuse devient dure : "Je vous ai dit d'arrêter ? Continuez !" La femme continue de rencontrer les yeux du public et la chef prend tout son temps, murmure quelque chose à l'oreille de la femme, la tenant fermement par les cheveux.

    Au bout d'un moment, la meneuse s'empare de son T-shirt et fait un trou à côté de la poitrine qui permet à celle-ci de sortir du trou de la chemise. Elle demande ensuite de l'aide pour prendre deux assiettes du bar, l'une pleine de crème, l'autre de pudding au chocolat. La femme doit se tenir debout sur une serviette. La leader lui prend alors les mains pleines et lui barbouille les cheveux, le visage, le sein dénudé. La meneuse lui presse le chocolat et la crème dans la bouche jusqu'à ce qu'elle ne puisse plus avaler, mais seulement les recracher. Enfin, elle presse le chocolat et la crème à l'intérieur de la culotte entre les fesses. Ensuite, la dirigeante lui demande de faire quelques pas en arrière, toujours debout sur la serviette. Elle est alors laissée là pour le reste de la soirée, sans s'être lavée ou avoir pris d'autres vêtements.

    De nombreux tabous sont transgressés au cours de la session. La femme est vulnérable et exposée devant le public. Son pull est baissé pour exposer sa poitrine et certaines parties de son corps sont barbouillées. La meneuse ouvre son corps au public en la forçant à garder un contact visuel avec tous les spectateurs. Le regard relie son corps à d'autres corps et les limites entre son corps et le public deviennent diffuses et se relâchent. Au cours de la séance, comme dans le corps grotesque de Bakhtine, la bouche, la poitrine, le sexe et les fesses sont au centre de l'attention. Lorsqu'un trou est fait dans le t-shirt et qu'un sein est retiré, une attention particulière est accordée aux "pousses et aux branches, à tout ce qui prolonge le corps et le relie à d'autres corps ou au monde extérieur" (Bakhtine 1965/1984, p. 317). Lorsque le chocolat est pressé dans sa bouche, les liens avec la bouche béante deviennent clairs. Une autre partie est l'exagération lors de la séance. Bakhtine parle d'hyperboles comme étant des exagérations aiguës et proéminentes. Celles-ci sont particulièrement frappantes dans les images du corps en relation avec la nourriture. Le fait de remplir les ouvertures du corps avec de la nourriture et de transformer le privé en public (exposition de parties du corps) peut, selon les termes de Bakhtine, être considéré comme un "déclassement". […]

    Dans la société moderne, il y a un contrôle accru des émotions, des fonctions corporelles et de l'expressivité, et un mépris correspondant pour les révélations corporelles, les odeurs, les fluides et les sons. Le sociologue Pasi Falk (1994) s'inspire de la théorie de Bakhtin pour décrire un changement historique, où le corps ouvert s'est transformé pour devenir plus fermé. Le corps fermé est caractérisé par un contrôle fort de l'expression corporelle et émotionnelle. Selon Bakhtin, le corps fermé moderne :

    ... présente un corps entièrement fini, achevé, strictement limité, qui est montré de l'extérieur comme quelque chose d'individuel. Ce qui dépasse, gonfle, germe ou se ramifie (lorsqu'un corps dépasse ses limites et qu'un nouveau commence) est éliminé, caché ou modéré. Tous les orifices du corps sont fermés. Comme le corps fermé ne doit pas se réconcilier avec d'autres corps, la surface du corps aura une signification importante en tant que limite (p. 320).

    Dans la société moderne, il y a peu d'arènes où les émotions fortes sont permises. Pour l'individu moderne, cela signifie une dynamique entre le maintien et la discipline (cf. Foucault 1977), et la perte de contrôle de soi. Pour pouvoir contrôler la limite de son corps, il faut contrôler les fluides qui entrent et sortent du corps. Malgré cette distance par rapport à "l'autre grotesque", il existe néanmoins une fascination et un enchantement complexes. C'est pourquoi, selon Featherstone (2007), il existe une nostalgie des arènes où les limites peuvent être dépassées, et où la retenue peut être relâchée. Featherstone fournit des exemples de lieux tels que les théâtres, les carnavals, les cirques et les environnements exotiques. Comme indiqué ci-dessus, il devient clair que les environnements BDSM peuvent constituer une telle arène pour l'expression transgressive et émotionnelle. Il faut également souligner que les activités deviennent érotiques pour leurs participants ne serait-ce que parce qu'elles sont taboues. […]

    La session décrite a été associée à de fortes émotions, tant de la part des participants que du public. Lorsque j'ai visité Darkside (communauté BDSM sur internet) le lendemain, la soirée a été décrite avec des mots forts, où beaucoup ont été bouleversés de manière positive par cette expérience forte, et ont décerné cinq des cinq étoiles possibles. Il en était de même pour la femme qui avait elle-même participé à la session.

    Dans la prochaine note de terrain, l'intimité et la vulnérabilité collectives sont centrales. Le participant explique qu'il a longtemps travaillé sur l'identité de genre et s'est récemment ouvert à la transsexualité. La note de terrain est tirée d'un atelier sur l'humiliation avec une cinquantaine de personnes dans le public :

    La session commence par l'animatrice de l'atelier assis sur un canapé avec le participant. Elle demande quelle est la relation du participant avec les jeux de dégradation et lui demande à de le raconter. Pendant ce temps, elle caresse doucement le cou du participant et ses mains. Puis elle enlève le châle du participant et utilise la chemise à manches longues pour attacher ses bras ; elle lie un bras sur son dos et l'autre sur sa poitrine. Elle attache le châle autour du corps, le fixant ainsi dans une seule position. L'animatrice pose le participant sur le dos, au sol. Elle s'assoit sur son corps, sort des stylos du tableau noir, regarde dans les yeux et dit "Elle ?". En même temps, elle écrit le mot sur ses seins. Le participant secoue la tête et dit "Non". Le chef dit "Il ?", et écrit le mot en même temps. Il répond "Non" et secoue encore la tête. Cela continue, les mots sont écrits sur le haut du corps encore et encore. Enfin, il n'est pas possible de lire les mots parce qu'ils ont été écrasés de nombreuses fois. La foule est à l'étroit et je ressens l'atmosphère comme très émotionnelle. Le chef de file remonte le stylo et dit : "ça ?". Et le participant acquiesce et répond avec un grand soulagement, oui. Le rituel est répété encore et encore. Enfin, il y a un seul gros "IT" sur le haut du corps du participant et la séance est terminée. "ça" est couché sur le côté, sa bouche sert de porte-crayon et son corps de pouf au chef, qui se tourne vers le public et résume l'atelier.

    Dans cette mise en scène, le corps est également au centre de l'attention. Afin de comprendre la ritualisation qui a lieu, je reviens à la théorie de Collins (2005) sur les rituels d'interaction. Les deux sessions BDSM décrites répondent aux critères d'un rituel d'interaction. La charge émotionnelle collective et le focus commun sont au centre des deux sessions décrites. Il devient clair qu'elles ont une signification importante pour la communauté. Il y a des lignes établies entre l'intérieur et l'extérieur des rituels d'interaction. Les participants et le public savent qu'il s'agit d'un spectacle où les gens se sont portés volontaires et ont accepté ce qui se passe. Si une personne venait de l'extérieur, ne sachant pas que le BDSM est pratiqué, l'interprétation de la situation serait probablement complètement différente de la signification donnée par les "initiés". Il y a une proximité physique créée entre les participants et une concentration unifiée sur le leader et le participant. Le public dirige toute son attention sur les réactions émotionnelles et physiques du participant. Il y a donc une concentration d'attention commune.

    Les deux exemples montrent une forte expérience émotionnelle en rapport avec les sessions. Cette expérience peut être déduite de ce que Collins (2005) appelle l'énergie émotionnelle, un sentiment de dynamique de groupe. Il compare l'énergie émotionnelle au concept psychologique de "force motrice" ; elle se distingue de la première par une orientation sociale, où l'énergie émotionnelle est caractérisée par la fierté et l'engagement envers le groupe. Collins fait la distinction entre les émotions à long terme et à court terme. La première peut être décrite comme une émotion où le souci de l'individu pour son propre sens de l'identité, l'attention aux autres, l'interaction et la communauté sont importants. Dans un rituel d'interaction, les participants entrent dans le rite avec un ensemble d'émotions. Selon Collins, ces émotions sont de courte durée et temporaires. Le résultat ou l'effet d'un rituel sont des émotions à long terme, telles que l'appartenance, la dynamique de groupe et la communauté. Il donne l'exemple des funérailles, où les émotions de courte durée sont la tristesse et le manque, mais où les résultats des funérailles sont des sentiments de communauté de groupe avec les autres participants.

    L'énergie émotionnelle d'une session BDSM peut être décrite comme suit : les sentiments initiaux décrits par les participants sont le désir, l'anticipation et l'excitation. Par exemple, dans le premier atelier décrit, le public fait remarquer que la participante glousse, rougit, a honte et a un rythme cardiaque accru. Ce sont les sentiments que Collins considère comme éphémères. Pendant le rituel, les participants forment une communauté de groupe et ont un objectif commun, ce qui est évident dans les exemples. Les sentiments individuels initiaux se transforment en sentiments partagés et dynamiques de groupe. Après la séance, les sentiments d'adhésion, d'amour, d'affection, de camaraderie et de vulnérabilité sont décrits. Ces émotions, selon Collins, sont durables. Collins (2005, p. 149) pose la question suivante : "Qu'est-ce qui détermine les rituels d'interaction auxquels un individu va se joindre plutôt que d'autres rituels, et pourquoi certains individus développent un goût plus prononcé pour la solidarité rituelle que d'autres ?", et il affirme que les individus qui ont pris part à des rituels d'interaction réussis développent un goût pour une plus grande solidarité rituelle et sont motivés pour répéter cette pratique. Dans le cadre d'une recherche de terrain sur les dominatrices professionnelles, Lindemann (2011) décrit un discours inattendu qui a émergé : "les répondantes se sont à plusieurs reprises qualifiés de "thérapeutes", parlant de leur travail comme d'une forme de traitement psychologique pour leurs clients" (p.151). Elle analyse le BDSM comme un dispositif permettant de faire face aux traumatismes du passé et comme un répit psychologique face aux pressions de la vie postmoderne. Elle souligne que dans le BDSM, les praticiens sont capables d'exprimer ces désirs qui ont été historiquement conceptualisés comme problématiques et pathologiques, dans un contexte qui est libre de tout jugement social ou de toute répercussion (voir aussi Barker et al. 2007).

    Conclusions.

    J'ai analysé le BDSM comme une arène où les corps sont autorisés (ou obligés) d'être ce que Bakhtin appelle ouverts, dans une société où le corps fermé est élevé au rang d'idéal. Une conclusion tirée du travail de terrain est que la pratique du BDSM est en grande partie une question de dévouement, de transgression et d'expression émotionnelle. La pratique peut permettre d'explorer des domaines qui sont généralement perçus comme tabous. Les sessions BDSM répondent aux critères de ce que Collins appelle des "rituels d'interaction" et créent des sentiments dynamiques de groupe et une énergie émotionnelle fortement interconnectés sous forme de symboles de guérison, d'amour, d'affection, de vulnérabilité et d'appartenance, ce qui peut impliquer à la fois une signification et un intérêt pour la pratique du BDSM. S'inspirant de Douglas et Collins, l'article montre que les rituels BDSM ressemblent à des rituels religieux et servent les mêmes objectifs pour les participants. Puisque l'aspect rituel des sessions BDSM peut être compris comme un catalyseur d'expressions et d'énergie émotionnelle, cette conclusion peut fournir une base pour comprendre pourquoi les gens recherchent ce genre de communautés. Le BDSM devient une zone libre dans laquelle les corps sont autorisés à être ouverts au sens bakhtinien, c'est-à-dire transgressifs et hors de contrôle.

    -Charlotta Carlström, "BDSM, Interaction Rituals and Open Bodies", Sexuality & Culture, 22, 209–219 (2018). https://doi.org/10.1007/s12119-017-9461-7.



    _________________
    « La racine de toute doctrine erronée se trouve dans une erreur philosophique. [...] Le rôle des penseurs vrais, mais aussi une tâche de tout homme libre, est de comprendre les possibles conséquences de chaque principe ou idée, de chaque décision avant qu'elle se change en action, afin d'exclure aussi bien ses conséquences nuisibles que la possibilité de tromperie. »
    -Jacob Sher, Avertissement contre le socialisme, Introduction à « Tableaux de l'avenir social-démocrate » d'Eugen Richter, avril 1998.


      La date/heure actuelle est Sam 31 Oct - 13:27