L'Académie nouvelle

Vous souhaitez réagir à ce message ? Créez un compte en quelques clics ou connectez-vous pour continuer.
L'Académie nouvelle

Forum d'archivage politique et scientifique

Le Deal du moment :
PC portable Gaming – ERAZER – DEPUTY P40 ...
Voir le deal
899.99 €

    Mary Ruwart, Pollution Solution

    Johnathan R. Razorback
    Johnathan R. Razorback
    Admin


    Messages : 17048
    Date d'inscription : 12/08/2013
    Localisation : France

    Mary Ruwart, Pollution Solution Empty Mary Ruwart, Pollution Solution

    Message par Johnathan R. Razorback Lun 13 Mai - 17:38

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mary_Ruwart

    "Who's the greatest polluter of all? The oil companies? The chemical companies? The nuclear power plants? If you guessed "none of the above," you'd be correct. Our government, at the federal, state, and local levels, is the single greatest polluter in the land. In addition, our government doesn't even clean up its own garbage! In 1988, for example, the EPA demanded that the Departments of Energy and Defense clean up 17 of their weapons plants which were leaking radioactive and toxic chemicals -- enough contamination to cost $100 billion in clean-up costs over 50 years! The EPA was simply ignored. No bureaucrats went to jail or were sued for damages. Government departments have sovereign immunity.

    In 1984, a Utah court ruled that the U.S. military was negligent in its nuclear testing, causing serious health problems (e.g. death) for the people exposed to radioactive fallout. The Court of Appeals dismissed the claims of the victims, because government employees have sovereign immunity.

    Hooker Chemical begged the Niagara Falls School Board not to excavate the land where Hooker had safely stored toxic chemical waste. The school board ignored these warnings and taxpayers had to foot a $30 million relocation bill when health problems arose. The EPA filed suit, not against the reckless school board, but against Hooker Chemical! Government officials have sovereign immunity.

    Government, both federal and local, is the greatest single polluter in the U.S. This polluter literally gets away with murder because of sovereign immunity. Libertarians would make government as responsible for its actions as everyone else is expected to be. Libertarians would protect the environment by first abolishing sovereign immunity.

    By turning to government for environmental protection, we've placed the fox in charge of the hen house -- and a very large hen house it is! Governments, both federal and local, control over 40% of our country's land mass. Unfortunately, government's stewardship over our land is gradually destroying it.

    For example, the Bureau of Land Management controls an area almost twice the size of Texas, including nearly all of Alaska and Nevada. Much of this land is rented to ranchers for grazing cattle. Because ranchers are only renting the land, they have no incentive to take care of it. Not surprisingly, studies as early as 1925 indicated that cattle were twice as likely to die on public ranges and had half as many calves as animals grazing on private lands.

    Obviously, owners make better environmental guardians than renters. If the government sold its acreage to private ranchers, the new owners would make sure that they grazed the land sustainably to maximize profit and yield.

    Indeed, ownership of wildlife can literally save endangered species from extinction. Between 1979 and 1989, Kenya banned elephant hunting, yet the number of these noble beasts dropped from 65,000 to 19,000. In Zimbabwe during the same time period, however, elephants could be legally owned and sold. The number of elephants increased from 30,000 to 43,000 as their owners became fiercely protective of their "property." Poachers didn't have a chance!

    Similarly, commercialization of the buffalo saved it from extinction. We never worry about cattle becoming extinct, because their status as valuable "property" encourages their propagation. The second step libertarians would take to protect the environment and save endangered species would be to encourage private ownership of both land and animals.

    Environmentalists were once wary of private ownership, but now recognize that establishing the property rights of native people, for example, has become an effective strategy to save the rain forests. Do you remember the movie, Medicine Man, where scientist Sean Connery discovers a miracle drug in the rain forest ecology? Unfortunately, the life-saving compound is literally bulldozed under when the government turns the rain forest over to corporate interests. The natives that scientist Connery lives with are driven from their forest home. Their homesteading rights are simply ignored by their own government!

    Our own Native Americans were driven from their rightful lands as well. Similarly, our national forests are turned over to logging companies, just as the rain forests are. By 1985, the U.S. Forest Service had built 350,000 miles of logging roads with our tax dollars -- outstripping our interstate highway system by a factor of eight! In the meantime, hiking trails declined by 30%. Clearly, our government serves special interest groups instead of protecting our environmental heritage.

    Even our national parks are not immune from abuse. Yellowstone's Park Service once encouraged employees to trap predators (e.g., wolves, fox, etc.) so that the hoofed mammals favored by visitors would flourish. Not surprisingly, the ecological balance was upset. The larger elk drove out the deer and sheep, trampled the riverbanks, and destroyed beaver habitat. Without the beavers, the water fowl, mink, otter, and trout were threatened. Without the trout or the shrubs and berries that once lined the riverbanks, grizzlies began to endanger park visitors in their search for food. As a result, park officials had to remove the bears and have started bringing back the wolves.

    Wouldn't we be better served if naturalist organizations, such as the Audubon Society or Nature Conservancy, took over the management of our precious parks? The Audubon Society's Rainey Wildlife Sanctuary partially supports itself with natural gas wells operated in an ecologically sound manner. In addition to preserving the sensitive habitat, the Society shows how technology and ecology can co-exist peacefully and profitably.

    The environment would benefit immensely from the elimination of sovereign immunity coupled with the privatization of "land and beast." The third and final step in the libertarian program to save the environment is the use of restitution both as a deterrent and a restorative. Next month's column will feature the second part of the Pollution Solution, answering the question: "How would libertarians keep our air and water clean?"

    -Mary J. Ruwart, "Pollution Solution" in Healing Our World: The Other Piece of the Puzzle (Kalamazoo, MI: SunStar Press, 1993), pp.171-182.





    _________________
    « La question n’est pas de constater que les gens vivent plus ou moins pauvrement, mais toujours d’une manière qui leur échappe. » -Guy Debord, Critique de la séparation (1961).

    « Rien de grand ne s’est jamais accompli dans le monde sans passion. » -Hegel, La Raison dans l'Histoire.

    « Mais parfois le plus clair regard aime aussi l’ombre. » -Friedrich Hölderlin, "Pain et Vin".

    Johnathan R. Razorback
    Johnathan R. Razorback
    Admin


    Messages : 17048
    Date d'inscription : 12/08/2013
    Localisation : France

    Mary Ruwart, Pollution Solution Empty Re: Mary Ruwart, Pollution Solution

    Message par Johnathan R. Razorback Mar 24 Mar - 13:42

    "Qui est le plus grand des pollueurs ? Les compagnies pétrolières ? Les entreprises chimiques ? Les centrales nucléaires ? Si vous pensiez "aucune de ces réponses", vous étiez dans le vrai. Notre gouvernement, aux niveaux fédéral, étatique et local, est le plus grand pollueur du pays. De plus, notre gouvernement ne nettoie même pas ses propres déchets ! En 1988, par exemple, l'EPA [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency] a exigé que les départements de l'énergie et de la défense nettoient 17 de leurs usines d'armement qui laissaient échapper des produits chimiques radioactifs et toxiques - une contamination suffisante pour coûter 100 milliards de dollars en frais de nettoyage sur 50 ans ! L'EPA a tout simplement été ignorée. Aucun bureaucrate n'est allé en prison ou n'a été poursuivi en justice pour dommages et intérêts. Les ministères ont une immunité souveraine.

    En 1984, un tribunal de l'Utah a jugé que l'armée américaine avait été négligente dans ses essais nucléaires, causant de graves problèmes de santé (par exemple la mort) aux personnes exposées aux retombées radioactives. La Cour d'appel a rejeté les demandes des victimes, car les employés du gouvernement jouissent d'une immunité souveraine.

    Hooker Chemical a supplié le conseil scolaire de Niagara Falls de ne pas excaver le terrain où Hooker avait entreposé en toute sécurité des déchets chimiques toxiques. La commission scolaire a ignoré ces avertissements et les contribuables ont dû payer une facture de 30 millions de dollars pour le déménagement lorsque des problèmes de santé sont apparus. L'EPA a porté plainte, non pas contre la commission scolaire imprudente, mais contre Hooker Chemical ! Les fonctionnaires du gouvernement jouissent d'une immunité souveraine.

    Le gouvernement, tant fédéral que local, est le plus grand pollueur aux États-Unis. Ce pollueur s'en tire à bon compte de véritables meurtres grâce à l'immunité souveraine. Les libéraux rendraient le gouvernement aussi responsable de ses actes que tout le monde est censé l'être. Les libertariens protégeraient l'environnement en abolissant d'abord l'immunité souveraine.

    En se tournant vers le gouvernement pour la protection de l'environnement, nous avons confié au renard la responsabilité du poulailler - et c'est un très grand poulailler ! Les gouvernements, tant fédéral que local, contrôlent plus de 40 % de la surface de notre pays. Malheureusement, l'intendance du gouvernement sur nos terres les détruit progressivement.

    Par exemple, le Bureau of Land Management contrôle une zone presque deux fois plus grande que le Texas, comprenant presque tout l'Alaska et le Nevada. Une grande partie de ces terres sont louées à des éleveurs pour faire paître le bétail. Comme les éleveurs ne peuvent que louer la terre, ils ne sont pas incités à en prendre soin. Il n'est pas surprenant que des études menées dès 1925 aient indiqué que le bétail avait deux fois plus de chances de mourir dans les pâturages publics et qu'il y avait deux fois moins de veaux que d'animaux qui paissaient sur des terres privées.

    De toute évidence, les propriétaires privés sont de meilleurs gardiens de l'environnement que les locataires. Si le gouvernement vendait ses terres à des éleveurs privés, les nouveaux propriétaires s'assureraient qu'ils font paître la terre de façon durable pour maximiser les profits et le rendement.

    En effet, avoir un droit de propriété sur des espèces sauvages peut littéralement sauver des espèces menacées d'extinction. Entre 1979 et 1989, le Kenya a interdit la chasse à l'éléphant, mais le nombre de ces nobles bêtes est passé de 65 000 à 19 000. Au Zimbabwe, pendant la même période, les éléphants pouvaient cependant être légalement possédés et vendus. Le nombre d'éléphants est passé de 30 000 à 43 000, leurs propriétaires étant devenus farouchement protecteurs de leur "propriété". Les braconniers n'avaient aucune chance !

    De même, la commercialisation du buffle l'a sauvé de l'extinction. On ne s'inquiète jamais de l'extinction du bétail, car son statut de "propriété" précieuse encourage sa propagation. La deuxième mesure que prendraient les libertariens pour protéger l'environnement et sauver les espèces menacées serait d'encourager la propriété privée des terres et des animaux.

    Les défenseurs de l'environnement se méfiaient autrefois de la propriété privée, mais reconnaissent aujourd'hui que l'établissement des droits de propriété des populations autochtones, par exemple, est devenu une stratégie efficace pour sauver les forêts tropicales. Vous souvenez-vous du film Medicine Man, dans lequel le scientifique Sean Connery découvre un médicament miracle dans les écosystèmes des forêts tropicales ? Malheureusement, le composé qui sauve des vies est littéralement détruit au bulldozer lorsque le gouvernement cède la forêt tropicale aux intérêts des entreprises. Les indigènes avec lesquels vit le scientifique Connery sont chassés de leur habitat forestier. Leurs droits de propriété sont tout simplement ignorés par leur propre gouvernement !

    Nos propres Amérindiens ont également été chassés de leurs terres légitimes. De même, nos forêts nationales sont remises aux sociétés d'exploitation forestière, tout comme les forêts tropicales. En 1985, le service forestier américain avait construit 350 000 miles de routes forestières avec l'argent de nos impôts, soit huit fois plus que notre réseau routier inter-États ! Dans le même temps, les sentiers de randonnée ont diminué de 30 %. Il est clair que notre gouvernement sert des groupes d'intérêts particuliers au lieu de protéger notre patrimoine environnemental.

    Même nos parcs nationaux ne sont pas à l'abri des abus. Le service des parcs de Yellowstone a déjà encouragé ses employés à piéger les prédateurs (par exemple, les loups, les renards, etc.) afin que les mammifères à sabots préférés des visiteurs puissent s'épanouir. Sans surprise, l'équilibre écologique a été rompu. Les grands wapitis chassaient les cerfs et les moutons, piétinaient les berges et détruisaient l'habitat des castors. Sans les castors, les oiseaux aquatiques, les visons, les loutres et les truites étaient menacés. Sans les truites, les arbustes et les baies qui bordaient autrefois les rives, les grizzlis ont commencé à mettre en danger les visiteurs du parc dans leur recherche de nourriture. En conséquence, les responsables du parc ont dû retirer les ours et ont commencé à ramener les loups.

    Ne serions-nous pas mieux servis si des organisations de protection de la nature, telles que la Société Audubon ou Nature Conservancy, prenaient en charge la gestion de nos précieux parcs ? Le sanctuaire de la faune sauvage de la Société Audubon s'alimente en partie grâce à des puits de gaz naturel exploités de manière écologique. En plus de préserver l'habitat sensible, cette société montre comment la technologie et l'écologie peuvent coexister de manière pacifique et rentable.

    L'environnement bénéficierait énormément de l'élimination de l'immunité souveraine associée à une privatisation de "la terre et de la bête". La troisième et dernière étape du programme libéral pour sauver l'environnement est la restitution à la fois comme moyen de dissuasion et de restauration. La rubrique du mois prochain présentera la deuxième partie de la solution à la pollution, en répondant à la question : "Comment les libéraux pourraient-ils garder notre air et notre eau propres ?
    "
    -Mary J. Ruwart, "Pollution Solution" in Healing Our World: The Other Piece of the Puzzle (Kalamazoo, MI: SunStar Press, 1993), pp.171-182.




    _________________
    « La question n’est pas de constater que les gens vivent plus ou moins pauvrement, mais toujours d’une manière qui leur échappe. » -Guy Debord, Critique de la séparation (1961).

    « Rien de grand ne s’est jamais accompli dans le monde sans passion. » -Hegel, La Raison dans l'Histoire.

    « Mais parfois le plus clair regard aime aussi l’ombre. » -Friedrich Hölderlin, "Pain et Vin".


      La date/heure actuelle est Jeu 21 Sep - 12:31