L'Académie nouvelle

Vous souhaitez réagir à ce message ? Créez un compte en quelques clics ou connectez-vous pour continuer.
L'Académie nouvelle

Forum d'archivage politique et scientifique

-17%
Le deal à ne pas rater :
-100€ sur TV QLED 65″ CONTINENTAL EDISON Android
499.99 € 599.99 €
Voir le deal

    Lachlan Doughney, “Ayn Rand and Deducing 'Ought' from 'Is'.”

    Johnathan R. Razorback
    Johnathan R. Razorback
    Admin


    Messages : 9927
    Date d'inscription : 12/08/2013
    Localisation : France

    Lachlan Doughney, “Ayn Rand and Deducing 'Ought' from 'Is'.” Empty Lachlan Doughney, “Ayn Rand and Deducing 'Ought' from 'Is'.”

    Message par Johnathan R. Razorback Dim 29 Mar - 16:20

    "[Tibor] Machan claims further that Rand did not deduce "ought" statements from "is" statements."(p.152)

    "Hare agrees with Hume, and believes he has a profound philosophical insight in this passage." (p.152)

    "In the following section of this paper, Rand's theory will be systematically explained so that the two ways in which she claims to have deduced an "ought" conclusion from only "is" premises may be meaninfully understood. One of her déductions is not moral, and one is moral. The deduction that is moral concerns human beigns, and is a deduction of an "ought" conclusion that contains all the normative claims of her ethical theory." (p.155)

    "Rand is an Aristotelian (Den Uyl and Rasmussen 1984b, 3). As such, she holds that there must be an ultimate value toward which all goal-oriented action aims. This Aristotelian notion that there is Something "for the sake of which everything else is done" (Wheeler 1984, 83) is indeed central to her theory. Rand believes that for any normative theory to be "meaningful, to make sense, there must be an ultimate end" (Rasmussen 1980, 70). Her argument is thus strongly teleological. She cannot accept the notion that values are "an arbitrary human invention, unrelated to, underived from and unsupported by any facts of reality" (Rand 1964, 2) ; this, for her, would take away any meaning that values and ethics in general possess. She believes that the only acceptable way to establish a connection between "values and the facts of reality" (7) is to postulate an ultimate value stated as a fact, as an "is statement about the world. For her, this gives an absolute, objective basis upon which her normative claims are justified. She argues for an ultimate value in the following passage:

    Without an ultimate goal or end, there can be no lesser goals or means: a series of means going off into an infinite progression toward a nonexistent end is a metaphysical and epistemological impossibility. It is only an ultimate goal, an end in itself, that makes the existence of values possible.

    Essentialy, Rand believes that we need an ultimate value, which is at the same time a fact about the world, an "is", that explains the entire normative enterprise in order to arrive at any justifiable "ought" conclusion with truth value. This is why Rand attempts to deduce "ought" conclusions completely from "is" premises, as she believes that this gives all her normative claims objective, factual status." (pp.56-57)

    "To describe what the ultimate value is Rand identifies, in her opinion, the only objective alternative between success and Failure in ends of all living things. She argues that this is the "fundamental alternative between life and death" (Blair 1985, 94). The physical fonctions of all living things, such as "nutritive function in the single cell of an amoeba to the blood circulation in the body of man" (Rand 1964, 6) automatically aim tat preserving life and not death. As such, Rand claims that the ultimate value, that thing "for the sake of which everything else is done" (Wheeler 1984, 83), that which is to be achieved or maintained as an end, "for any given entity is its own life" (Rand 1964, 7). Rand further holds that any known living creature, except for a human being, has "an automatic code of values", and "cannot decide to choose the evil and acte as its own destroyer" (10-11). Such creatures, she claims, seek to succeed in achieving and maintaining their lives as their ultimate end, in the face of the alteranative of failing in this end, death. She holds that same value applies to human beings too, but that a human can "act as its own destroyer" and may choose "evil" (11) values that do not have life as their end." (pp.57-58)

    "The Following is the deductive argument for life as the ultimate value of simple living things. The value is given as a descriptive fact, as an "is" statement about the world:

    D. V is a value X if X acts to achieve/maintain V as an end. - Analytic "is".

    P. Any simple living thing acts to achieve/maintain its own life as an end. Empirical "is".

    C. Any simple living thing's life is a value for itself. - Evaluative "is".

    After postulating life as the ultimate value for all living creatures, Rand claims that this ultimate value allows her to bridge the is-ought gap. She says:


    Let me stress that the fact that living entities exist and function necessitates the existence of values and of an ultimate value which for any given living entity is its own life. Thus the validation of value judgements is to be achieved by reference to the facts of reality. The fact that a living entity is, determines what is ought to do. So much for the issue of the relation between "is" and "ought"." (p.7-Cool." (p.158)

    "This is in need some explanation. Rand argues that the actions that allow all creatures to succeed in their ultimate value, the achievement and maintenance of their own life, is determined by what kind of creature they are. For example, sustenance is a crucial compotent of any creature's continued survival, and different creatures use different methods to feed themselves. Indeed, she believes that where "a plant can obtain its food from the soil in which it grows", a lion "has to hunt for it" and "man has to produce it" (9). Rand argues that those actions that are successful for specific creatures in preserving their lives, given the kind of creature they are, are the actions they ought to take. This is because part of what it is to hold the achivement and maintenance of a Something as an end (to hold it as a value), is to prefer success over Failure in this end, or else one would not act for this end.
    An example can explain this concept. Actions that are suitable to preserving lion's lives are the actions that they ought to take because such actions allow them to succeed in achieving and maintaining their own lives. This is their ultimate value, and implicit in holding it is to prefer values that achieve it. Conversely, actions that are not suitable to preserving lion's lives are the actions that they ought not to take because such actions do not allow them to succeed in achieving and maintaining their own lives. This is their ultimate value, and implicit in holding it is to avoid actions that do not achieve it. Whether lions belived, or are capable of understanding, which actions are better or worse for the maintenance of their lives is irrelevant. It is a fact that certains courses of action are better than others for maintaining the life of a lion, such as the acte of stalking prey. Lions that can stalk prey will be able to better maintain their lives than lions that cannot, as stalking prey is crucial to the survival of a lion
    ." (pp.158-159)

    "Rand derives the kind of ultimate value human beings have from the kind of creatures we are. Rand believes that, as with all other creatures, the ultimate value for humain beings is our own lives. However, humans are unlike all other creatures in a crucial way. We are rational beings but "rationality is a matter of choice" (Rand 1964, 16). What this means can be better understood by reference to the nature of the ultimate value that all other non-human animals possess. Rand explains:

    An animal has no choice in the standard of value directing in actions: its senses provide it with an automatic code of values, an automatic knowledge of what is good for it or evil, what benefits or endangers its life. An animal has no power to extend its knowledge or to evade it. In situations for which its knowledge is inadequate, it perishes -as, for instance, an animal that stands paralyzed on the track of a railroad in the path of a speeding train. But so long as it lives, an animal acts on its knowledge, with automatic safety and no power of choice: it cannot suspend its own consciousness - il cannot choose not to perceive - it cannot evade its own perception - it cannot ignore its own good, il cannot decide to choose the evil and act as its own destroyer. (10)" (p.160)

    "Rand claims that for humans to act in accordance with their nature they must choose those "actions, values and goals by the standard of that which is proper to man -in order to achieve, maintain, fulfill and enjoy that ultimate value, that end in itself, which is his own life" (Rand 1964, 19). As Hartford (2007) explains, acting rationally, for Rand, denotes "the choice to use objectivity" (301) or to hold as a fact that one's life is the ultimate value as a fact and, consequently, it is irrational to act through some other motivation. She believes that to do so "contradicts the facts of reality" and that a man who would do so "disintegrates his consciouness" (Rand 1964, 24) and degenerates into subhuman behavior, perhaps even leading to his untimely death.
    The logical structure of Rand's deductive argument regarding human beings is nearly identical to that applying to simple living things. It is as follows:

    D. V is a value for X if X acts to achieve/maintain V as an end. Analytic 'is".

    P. Any rational being acts to achieve/maintain its own life as an end. - Analytic "is".

    C. Any rational being's life is a value for itself. - Evaluative "is".

    The difference here is that rational beings are those who act rationally and do Indeed hold their life as the ultimate value. This may not Apply to all human beings
    ." (p.162)

    "Rand argues that her system of "rational ethics will tell" humans "what principles of action are required to implement" our "choice" if we choose to live and hold our own life as our ultimate value (Rand 1982, 99)." (p.162)

    "Her ethical system is characterized as rational selfishness. This system is selfish because it demands people aim at the ultimate value that is the achievement and maintenance of their own life. One should never make any sacrifice of this value for the sake of others (Rand 1988, 4). Human life as the ultimate value is called "man's Survival qua man" (Rand 1964, 18).
    Rand's description of the ultimate value when applied to human beings is as follows:


    "Man's Survival qua man" means the terms, methods, conditions and goals required for the survival of a rational being through the whole of his lifespan -in all those aspects of existence which are open to his choice (18)." (p163)
    -Lachlan Doughney, “Ayn Rand and Deducing 'Ought' from 'Is'.” The Journal of Ayn Rand Studies, vol. 12, no. 1, 2012, pp. 151–168. JSTOR, www.jstor.org/stable/41607997. Accessed 8 Feb. 2020 : https://philpapers.org/rec/DOUARA



    _________________
    « La question n’est pas de constater que les gens vivent plus ou moins pauvrement, mais toujours d’une manière qui leur échappe. »
    -Guy Debord, Critique de la séparation (1961).

    « Rien de grand ne s’est jamais accompli dans le monde sans passion. »
    -Hegel, La Raison dans l'Histoire.

    Johnathan R. Razorback
    Johnathan R. Razorback
    Admin


    Messages : 9927
    Date d'inscription : 12/08/2013
    Localisation : France

    Lachlan Doughney, “Ayn Rand and Deducing 'Ought' from 'Is'.” Empty Re: Lachlan Doughney, “Ayn Rand and Deducing 'Ought' from 'Is'.”

    Message par Johnathan R. Razorback Mar 31 Mar - 19:09

    "Dans la section suivante de cet article, la théorie de Rand sera systématiquement expliquée afin que les deux façons dont elle prétend avoir déduit une conclusion normative à partir de prémisses purement descriptives puissent être comprises de manière claire. L'une de ses déductions n'est pas morale, et l'autre est morale. La déduction qui est morale concerne les humains, et est une déduction d'une conclusion "normative" qui contient toutes les revendications normatives de sa théorie éthique." (p.155)

    "Rand est une aristotélicienne […] À ce titre, elle estime qu'il doit y avoir une valeur ultime vers laquelle tend toute action orientée vers un but. Cette notion aristotélicienne selon laquelle il y a quelque chose "pour le bien duquel tout le reste est fait" […] est en effet au centre de sa théorie. Rand estime que pour que toute théorie normative soit "significative, pour avoir un sens, il faut qu'il y ait une fin ultime" […] Son argument est donc fortement téléologique. Elle ne peut accepter l'idée que les valeurs sont "une invention humaine arbitraire, sans rapport avec la réalité, sous-tendue et non soutenue par elle" […] cela, pour elle, enlèverait tout sens aux valeurs et à l'éthique en général. Elle estime que la seule façon acceptable d'établir un lien entre "les valeurs et les faits de la réalité" est de postuler une valeur ultime énoncée comme un fait, comme une " affirmation sur le monde". Pour elle, cela donne une base absolue et objective sur laquelle ses revendications normatives sont justifiées. […]
    Fondamentalement, Rand pense que nous avons besoin d'une valeur ultime, qui est en même temps un fait du monde, un "est", qui explique toute l'entreprise normative afin d'arriver à toute légitime conclusion normative ayant une valeur de vérité. C'est pourquoi Rand tente de déduire complètement les conclusions normatives de prémisses descriptives, car elle estime que cela donne à toutes ses affirmations normatives un statut objectif et factuel.
    " (pp.56-57)

    "Pour décrire quelle est la valeur ultime, Rand identifie, selon elle, la seule alternative objective entre le succès et l'échec dans les fins de tous les êtres vivants. Elle affirme qu'il s'agit de "l'alternative fondamentale entre la vie et la mort" […] Les fonctions physiques de tous les êtres vivants, telles que "la fonction nutritive dans la cellule unique d'une amibe pour la circulation sanguine dans le corps de l'homme" […] visent automatiquement à préserver la vie et non la mort. […] Rand soutient en outre que toute créature vivante connue, à l'exception de l'être humain, a "un code automatique de valeurs" et "ne peut pas décider de choisir le mal et d'agir comme son propre destructeur" […] De telles créatures, affirme-t-elle, cherchent à réussir et maintenir leur vie comme leur fin ultime, face à l'alternative de l'échec dans cette fin, la mort. Elle soutient que la même valeur s'applique également aux êtres humains, mais qu'un humain peut "agir comme son propre destructeur" et peut choisir des valeurs "maléfiques" qui n'ont pas la vie pour finalité." (pp.57-58)

    "Ce qui suit est l'argument déductif en faveur de la vie en tant que valeur ultime des êtres vivants les plus simples. Cette valeur est donnée comme un fait descriptif, comme une affirmation sur l'état du monde :

    1). V est une valeur X si X permet d'atteindre/maintenir V comme fin. - Le "est" est ici analytique.

    2). Toute chose vivante simple agit pour atteindre/maintenir sa propre vie comme une fin. Le "est" est ici empirique.

    3). La vie de tout être vivant simple est une valeur en soi. - Le "est" est ici évaluatif.

    Après avoir postulé que la vie est la valeur ultime pour tous les êtres vivants, Rand affirme que cette valeur ultime lui permet de combler le fossé entre "ce qui est" et "ce qui doit être". Elle affirme que:

    Laissez-moi souligner que le fait que les entités vivantes existent et fonctionnent nécessite l'existence de valeurs et d'une valeur ultime qui, pour toute entité vivante donnée, est sa propre vie. Ainsi, la validité des jugements de valeur doit être réalisée par référence aux faits de la réalité. Le fait qu'une entité vivante existe détermine ce qu'elle doit faire. Voilà pour la question de la relation entre "est" et "devrait". "

    "Cela nécessite une explication. Rand soutient que les actions qui permettent à toutes les créatures de réaliser leur valeur ultime, l'accomplissement et le maintien de leur propre vie, sont déterminées par le type de créature qu'elles sont. Par exemple, la subsistance est un élément crucial de la survie continue de toute créature, et différentes créatures utilisent différentes méthodes pour se nourrir. En effet, elle estime que là où "une plante peut obtenir sa nourriture du sol dans lequel elle pousse", un lion "doit la chasser" et "l'homme doit la produire". Rand soutient que les actions qui réussissent à préserver la vie de certaines créatures, étant donné le type de créature qu'elles sont, sont celles qu'elles doivent prendre. En effet, une partie de ce que c'est que de considérer la réalisation et le maintien d'une chose comme une fin (de la considérer comme une valeur), c'est de préférer le succès à l'échec dans ce but, sinon on n'agirait pas dans ce sens.

    Un exemple peut expliquer ce concept. Les actions qui conviennent pour préserver la vie des lions sont celles qu'ils doivent entreprendre parce que ces actions leur permettent de réussir à atteindre et à maintenir leur propre vie. C'est leur valeur ultime, et il est implicitement impliqué par le fait qu'ils l'ont qu'ils doivent préférer les valeurs qui y sont conformes. Inversement, les actions qui ne sont pas appropriées pour préserver la vie des lions sont celles qu'ils ne devraient pas prendre parce que ces actions ne leur permettent pas de réussir à atteindre et à maintenir leur propre vie. Il s'agit là de leur valeur ultime, et le fait de la détenir implique d'éviter les actions qui n'y parviennent pas. Que les lions aient des croyances ou soient capables de comprendre quelles actions sont meilleures ou pires pour le maintien de leur vie n'a aucune importance. Il est un fait que certaines actions sont meilleures que d'autres pour maintenir la vie d'un lion, comme l'acte de traquer une proie. Les lions qui peuvent traquer des proies seront mieux à même de maintenir leur vie que les lions qui ne le peuvent pas, car le pistage des proies est crucial pour la survie d'un lion.
    "

    "Rand dérive le type de valeur ultime que les êtres humains ont du type de créatures que nous sommes. Rand pense que, comme pour toutes les autres créatures, la valeur ultime des êtres humains est notre propre vie. Cependant, les humains sont différents de toutes les autres créatures d'une manière cruciale. Nous sommes des êtres rationnels, mais "la rationalité est une question de choix" […] Ce que cela signifie peut être mieux compris en se référant à la nature de la valeur ultime que possèdent tous les autres animaux non humains. Rand explique :

    Un animal n’a pas le choix de la norme des valeurs dirigeant ses actions : ses sens lui procurent un code de valeurs automatique, c’est-à-dire une connaissance automatique de ce qui est bon ou mauvais pour lui, de ce qui est favorable à sa vie ou de ce qui la met en danger. Un animal n’a pas le pouvoir d’accroître ses connaissances ou de ne pas en tenir compte. Dans les situations où ses connaissances sont inadéquates, il périt ; comme dans le cas de l’animal qui reste paralysé sur une voie de chemin de fer à l’arrivée d’un train. Mais tant qu’il vit, un animal se sert de ses connaissances, ce qui représente pour lui une sécurité automatique, mais aucun pouvoir de choix : il ne peut suspendre sa propre conscience, il ne peut pas choisir de ne pas percevoir, il ne peut pas éviter ses propres perceptions, il ne peut pas ignorer ce qui est bon pour lui, et ne peut choisir ce qui est mauvais et agir contre son propre intérêt."

    "Rand affirme que pour que l'homme puisse agir conformément à sa nature, il doit choisir les "actions, valeurs et buts selon la norme de ce qui est approprié à l'homme -afin d'atteindre, de maintenir, d'accomplir et de jouir de cette valeur ultime, cette fin en soi, qui est sa propre vie" […] Comme l'explique Hartford, agir de manière rationnelle, pour Rand, désigne "le choix de faire preuve d'objectivité"  ou de considérer comme un fait que sa propre vie est la valeur ultime en tant que fait et, par conséquent, il est irrationnel d'agir par le biais d'une autre motivation. Elle estime que le fait d'agir ainsi "contredit les faits de la réalité" et qu'un homme qui agirait ainsi "désintègre sa conscience" […] et dégénère en un comportement sous-humain, pouvant même conduire à sa mort prématurée.

    La structure logique de l'argument déductif de Rand concernant les êtres humains est presque identique à celle qui s'applique aux simples êtres vivants. Elle est la suivante :


    1). V est une valeur pour X si X permet d'atteindre/maintenir V comme fin. Le "est" est ici analytique.

    2). Tout être rationnel agit pour atteindre/maintenir sa propre vie comme une fin. - Le "est" est ici analytique.

    3). La vie de tout être rationnel est une valeur en soi. - Le "est" est ici évaluatif.

    La différence ici est que les êtres rationnels sont ceux qui agissent de manière rationnelle et qui tiennent effectivement leur vie comme valeur ultime. Cela peut ne pas s'appliquer à tous les êtres humains."

    "Rand soutient que son système d' "éthique rationnelle dira" aux humains "quels principes d'action sont nécessaires pour mettre en œuvre" notre "choix" si nous choisissons de vivre et de considérer notre propre vie comme notre valeur ultime."

    "Son système éthique est caractérisé par un égoïsme rationnel. Ce système est égoïste parce qu'il exige que les gens visent la valeur ultime qui est l'accomplissement et le maintien de leur propre vie. On ne devrait jamais sacrifier cette valeur pour le bien des autres [...] La vie humaine en tant que valeur ultime est appelée "la survie de l'homme en tant qu'homme" [...]
    La description de Rand de la valeur ultime lorsqu'elle est appliquée aux êtres humains est la suivante :


    "La survie de l'homme en tant qu'homme" signifie les concepts, méthodes, conditions et objectifs nécessaires à la survie d'un être rationnel tout au long de sa vie - dans tous les aspects de l'existence qui sont ouverts à son choix"."
    -Lachlan Doughney, “Ayn Rand and Deducing 'Ought' from 'Is'.” The Journal of Ayn Rand Studies, vol. 12, no. 1, 2012, pp. 151–168. JSTOR, www.jstor.org/stable/41607997. Accessed 8 Feb. 2020 : https://philpapers.org/rec/DOUARA



    _________________
    « La question n’est pas de constater que les gens vivent plus ou moins pauvrement, mais toujours d’une manière qui leur échappe. »
    -Guy Debord, Critique de la séparation (1961).

    « Rien de grand ne s’est jamais accompli dans le monde sans passion. »
    -Hegel, La Raison dans l'Histoire.


      La date/heure actuelle est Mer 8 Déc - 16:09