L'Académie nouvelle

Vous souhaitez réagir à ce message ? Créez un compte en quelques clics ou connectez-vous pour continuer.
L'Académie nouvelle

Forum d'archivage politique et scientifique


    David M. G. Lewis, Eric M. Russell, Laith Al-Shawaf, Vivian Ta, Zeynep Senveli, William Ickes and David M. Buss, Why Women Wear High Heels: Evolution, Lumbar Curvature, and Attractiveness

    Johnathan R. Razorback
    Johnathan R. Razorback
    Admin

    Messages : 7712
    Date d'inscription : 12/08/2013
    Localisation : France

    David M. G. Lewis, Eric M. Russell, Laith Al-Shawaf, Vivian Ta, Zeynep Senveli, William Ickes and David M. Buss, Why Women Wear High Heels: Evolution, Lumbar Curvature, and Attractiveness Empty David M. G. Lewis, Eric M. Russell, Laith Al-Shawaf, Vivian Ta, Zeynep Senveli, William Ickes and David M. Buss, Why Women Wear High Heels: Evolution, Lumbar Curvature, and Attractiveness

    Message par Johnathan R. Razorback le Lun 9 Mar - 15:31

    https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fpsyg.2017.01875/full

    "Despite the widespread use of high-heeled footwear in both developing and modernized societies, we lack an understanding of this behavioral phenomenon at both proximate and distal levels of explanation. The current manuscript advances and tests a novel, evolutionarily anchored hypothesis for why women wear high heels, and provides convergent support for this hypothesis across multiple methods. Using a recently discovered evolved mate preference, we hypothesized that high heels influence women’s attractiveness via effects on their lumbar curvature. Independent studies that employed distinct methods, eliminated multiple confounds, and ruled out alternative explanations showed that when women wear high heels, their lumbar curvature increased and they were perceived as more attractive. Closer analysis revealed an even more precise pattern aligning with human evolved psychology: high-heeled footwear increased women’s attractiveness only when wearing heels altered their lumbar curvature to be closer to an evolutionarily optimal angle. These findings illustrate how human evolved psychology can contribute to and intersect with aspects of cultural evolution, highlighting that the two are not independent or autonomous processes but rather are deeply intertwined.

    Introduction
    “A woman’s beauty lies, not in any exaggeration of the specialized zones, nor in any general harmony that could be worked out by means of the sectio aurea or a similar aesthetic superstition; but in the arabesque of the spine.”
    – John Updike, Pigeon Feathers and Other Stories
    Women’s use of high-heeled shoes is a prevalent phenomenon in both developing and modernized societies (Miller, 1990; Freeman, 1999). In the United States alone, over $8,000,000,000 is spent annually on high-fashion footwear (Rossi, 1993). Several scholars (e.g., Roth, 1929; Smith, 1999; Morris et al., 2013; Guéguen, 2015) have advanced hypotheses about the function of high-heeled shoes for women. These ideas have ranged from the proposal of media-created associations between high heels and sexuality (e.g., Smith, 1999) to influences on specific biomechanical properties on women’s gait (e.g., Morris et al., 2013). However, these scholars have either not empirically tested their ideas or have found results suggesting that the reasons women wear high heels do not include the one they hypothesized (e.g., see Morris et al., 2013; Guéguen, 2015). In short, despite the widespread prevalence of high heels, the reasons why women wear high heels are not well understood.
    Recent research by Lewis et al. (2015) may provide insight into this unexplained phenomenon. Lewis et al. (2015) took into consideration an adaptive problem uniquely faced by bipedal hominin females: (1) a forward shifting center of mass during pregnancy, and (2) a morphological adaptation that evolved to solve this adaptive problem: wedging in women’s third-to-last lumbar vertebra (Whitcome et al., 2007). These researchers reasoned that ancestral women who possessed an intermediate degree of vertebral wedging would have experienced important fitness benefits, such as being able to sustain multiple pregnancies without suffering spinal injury and being able to forage longer into pregnancy. The fitness benefits experienced by these women, in turn, would have created selective conditions for the evolution of a male mate preference for such women. Ancestrally, a woman’s lumbar curvature would have been a reliable, observable cue to her vertebral wedging (George et al., 2003). Based on this, Lewis et al. (2015) hypothesized that men have an evolved mate preference for a lumbar angle of approximately 45.5° – a value that cues the ability to shift the gravid center of mass back over the hips and simultaneously avoids the adaptive problems of excessive lumbar curvature (hyperlordosis) and insufficient lumbar curvature (hypolordosis). In support of their hypothesis, Lewis et al. (2015) found that men’s attraction toward women peaks at this angle – the optimal angle for helping ancestral women mitigate the biomechanical costs of a bipedal fetal load and minimizing the likelihood of both hyperlordosis and hypolordosis.
    If lumbar curvature is an important attractiveness cue, and women possess psychological mechanisms to enhance their physical appearance (see Singh and Bronstad, 1997), then we might expect women to attempt to manipulate their lumbar curvature in ways that increase perceptions of their attractiveness. Independently, researchers interested in biomechanics and ergonomics have proposed that high-heeled shoes increase lumbar curvature (e.g., Lee et al., 2001). Together, these ideas yield a novel hypothesis about why women wear high heels: women may increase their attractiveness by manipulating their lumbar curvature with high-heeled shoes.
    To test this hypothesis, we conducted two independent studies, one using archival photos from the Internet, and the second employing a controlled, laboratory-based design.
    Study 1
    Introduction
    High Heels and Lumbar Curvature
    To date, findings bearing on the relationship between lumbar curvature and high-heeled footwear have been equivocal (Russell, 2010). They have been based on small samples (e.g., 11 participants), employed measures with low validity (Fedorak et al., 2003), and produced mixed results (e.g., Snow and Williams, 1994). As such, although the belief that high-heeled shoes are associated with greater lumbar curvature is widespread, reliable evidence supporting this relationship is lacking (see Russell, 2010 for a review). The first purpose of this study was therefore to investigate the relationship between wearing high heels and lumbar curvature.
    High Heels, Lumbar Curvature, and Attractiveness
    Lewis et al.’s (2015) research establishes the importance of lumbar curvature as an attractiveness cue, but to date no studies have concurrently measured women’s lumbar curvature and attractiveness as a function of high-heeled footwear usage. The second central purpose of Study 1 was therefore to establish whether women are perceived as more attractive when they wear high heels.
    Materials and Methods
    This study was carried out in accordance with the recommendations of The University of Texas at Austin Institutional Review Board. In accordance with the Declaration of Helsinki, all participants provided informed consent. Because data were collected online, participants indicated their consent electronically in lieu of providing a written signature. All participants indicated their consent in this manner, and the protocol was approved by The University of Texas Institutional Review Board.
    Photographic Stimuli
    Photographs of women wearing high-heeled and flat-soled shoes were downloaded from publically accessible websites on the Internet (links available upon request). Because individual differences in physical attractiveness are large enough to render undetectable any between-individual effects of high-heeled shoes on attractiveness (e.g., comparing the attractiveness of one woman in flats to another woman in heels), we employed a within-woman design. This required us to find images on the Internet of the same woman photographed twice, once in heels and once in flats. We also needed to be able to assess the women’s lumbar curvature, which can only be measured from the side, as in profile photographs. These constraints resulted in celebrity females representing an ideal source of data; a sufficiently wide selection of photographs of celebrity females was available on the Internet to identify two photographs of each woman, once in heels and once in flats, and both in profile. For each celebrity, we selected the first profile images that a Google search produced of the woman in heels and flats, respectively. We completed this procedure for 15 different female celebrities (list available upon request), resulting in a total stimulus set of 30 images.
    Lumbar Curvature Measurements
    We measured the women’s lumbar curvature by superimposing a virtual protractor tool (Screen Protractor, Iconico, Inc.) on a line parallel to the top of the lower back and a line parallel to the top of the buttocks, an operationalization of lumbar curvature used in clinical orthopedic settings (e.g., see George et al., 2003).
    Raters and Attractiveness Assessments
    One hundred twenty-six men (Mage = 19.77, SDage = 4.00, range = 17–52) rated the attractiveness of the photographic stimuli. Raters were randomly assigned to either view the 15 targets wearing flat-soled shoes or to view the 15 targets wearing high-heel shoes. The images were displayed in random order to the raters, who rated the attractiveness of each target on a 10-point scale (1 = extremely unattractive, 10 = extremely attractive).
    Results
    First, we set out to test whether the women’s lumbar curvature was greater while wearing high-heeled shoes than while wearing flat-soled shoes. A paired-samples t-test revealed that women’s lumbar curvature in high-heeled shoes (M = 43.37, SD = 9.06) was greater than their lumbar curvature in flat-soled shoes (M = 30.64, SD = 7.71), t(14) = 4.48, p = 0.001, d = 1.16. Second, we tested whether the women were perceived as more attractive in high heels than in flats. The women were perceived as more attractive when they were wearing high heels (M = 7.37, SD = 0.69) than when they were in flats (M = 6.47, SD = 1.11), t(14) = 3.10, p = 0.008, d = 0.94.
    Study 2
    Introduction
    The findings from Study 1 provide the first simultaneous evidence of the relationships between (1) high heels and lumbar curvature and (2) high heels and physical attractiveness. However, these results were based on photographs that differed not only in the women’s footwear, but also in many other variables that influence women’s physical appearance (e.g., cosmetics, revealing nature of clothing). Consequently, the relationship observed in Study 1 between donning high heels and being perceived as more attractive carries with it the attendant concerns about directionality and the third variable problem. Based on these Study 1 limitations, we conducted a second, controlled, laboratory-based study to better isolate and establish (1) the effect of high heels on lumbar curvature, (2) the relationship between high heels and attractiveness, and (3) the role that lumbar curvature plays in the high heels-attractiveness relationship.
    Why High Heels Increase Attractiveness
    Other researchers have proposed that high-heeled shoes increase women’s attractiveness, but have either neglected to explain why they increase attractiveness (e.g., Roth, 1929; Smith, 1999), or have advanced hypotheses that are not consistent with extant data. For example, Morris et al. (2013) hypothesize that high heels increase women’s attractiveness through their effects on specific biomechanical properties of women’s gait. Consistent with the notion that high heels increase women’s attractiveness, Morris et al. (2013, p. 180) found that women were perceived as more attractive in heels. However, they found “no consistent pattern of correlations between the biomechanical measures and the judgements of attractiveness of the individual walkers.” Guéguen (2015) subsequently purported to test Morris and colleagues’ hypothesis. Guéguen conducted multiple studies documenting a link between (1) women wearing high heels and (2) men engaging in behaviors thought to be indicators of increased attraction. For example, in two studies, he demonstrated that men were more likely to be willing to participate in a survey when the solicitation to participate came from a woman wearing high heels rather than flat-soled shoes. Importantly, he obtained these results using women who were “stationed” in front of a retail store and asked passers-by to participate – he obtained these results without gait cues. Morris et al.’s (2013) and Guéguen’s (2015) findings that high heels increase attractiveness in the absence of gait cues provide strong evidence that the gait hypothesis, even if partially correct, cannot account for high heels’ effect on women’s attractiveness when gait cues are absent. There must be other reasons that high heels increase women’s attractiveness, which, as yet, have not been identified.
    The lumbar curvature hypothesis represents one potential explanation. Moreover, the lumbar curvature hypothesis yields unique, specific a priori predictions about the effect of high heels on women’s attractiveness. Whereas other hypotheses generate the general prediction that women will be perceived as more attractive when they wear high heels, the lumbar curvature hypothesis offers a more nuanced set of predictions. Men do not simply prefer greater lumbar curvature. Rather, Lewis et al. (2015) document that men’s attraction to women increases as women’s lumbar curvature approaches a proposed theoretically optimum value—45.5°. If men are attracted to women in high heels partly because heels influence women’s lumbar curvature, then we should expect high heels to increase women’s attractiveness only when wearing heels shifts their lumbar curvature closer to the theoretical optimum, but not when the heels shift curvature away from this optimum.
    To test these predictions, control for other potential high-heel-related influences on attractiveness, and rule out alternative hypotheses, we conducted a second, controlled, laboratory-based study.
    Materials and Methods
    This study was carried out in accordance with the recommendations of The University of Texas at Arlington institutional review board. In accordance with the Declaration of Helsinki, all participants provided informed consent. Because data were collected online from rater participants, they indicated their consent electronically in lieu of providing a written signature. All model participants provided written informed consent. The protocol was approved by The University of Texas at Arlington institutional review board.
    Participants
    Fifty-six women (Mage = 19.36, SDage = 1.77, age range = 18–26) were recruited from a large public university in the Southwestern United States and received partial course credit for their participation.
    Procedure
    Participants were instructed to come to their scheduled lab session in form-fitting clothing (e.g., tight jeans, yoga pants, non-baggy tee-shirts) with a pair of their own flat-soled shoes (e.g., tennis shoes). Upon arrival at the laboratory, participants were greeted by a research assistant and told that they would be participating in a study examining female appearances. Participants were taken individually to a private room to be photographed. Two photographs were taken of each participant, once in flat-soled shoes and once in heeled footwear1. For each photograph, the assistant instructed the participant to stand against the wall with the right side of her body facing the wall. The assistant then took a full-body profile photograph. The same instructions were used for both photographs.
    Photographic Stimuli
    We generated a stimulus set of two images for each female participant. One image was generated from the photo of the woman in heels and the other was generated from her photo in flat-soled shoes (Figure 1).

    FIGURE 1

    FIGURE 1. Examples of photographic stimuli. The photographs of this woman are paired here, but all 112 study photographs – one of each of the 56 women in flats and one of each woman in heels – were presented individually and in random order, with order randomized anew for each participant.


    To maintain participant confidentiality in the images presented to the independent sample of male raters, we deleted from each photo the portion of the woman’s body above the shoulders using the cropping tool in Adobe Photoshop. We also cropped the photos at the height of the women’s ankles. This was a critical part of study design for several reasons. First, if men exhibit a preference for women’s height, and heels modify women’s height, then any potential relationship between high-heeled shoes and women’s attractiveness could be attributable to the effect of heels on their height. Similarly, if long legs are a cue to youth (Sear et al., 2004), men have a preference for such cues in women (Swami et al., 2006; Kiire, 2015) and high heels increase the distance between the floor and the top of the leg, then any heels-attractiveness link could potentially result from these relationships. Cropping the photographs at the women’s ankles – which results in the two images of each woman having the same height and leg length – eliminates both of these potential confounds. Second, if men are attracted to high-heeled shoes themselves, independent of the effects they have on other elements of female appearance such as lumbar curvature, then the inclusion of the footwear in the photographic stimuli could influence perceptions of the women’s attractiveness.
    Raters and Attractiveness Assessments
    Eighty-two men (Mage = 20.14, SDage = 2.43, range = 17–31) rated the attractiveness of the photographic stimuli. These participants completed the rating task online and viewed all 112 images in random order, with order randomized anew for each rater. The participants rated the attractiveness of the woman depicted in each photograph on a 10-point scale (1 = extremely unattractive, 10 = extremely attractive).
    Lumbar Curvature Measurements
    We measured women’s lumbar curvature following the same protocol as in Study 1.
    Results
    Data Preparation
    On average, women’s lumbar curvature increased in high-heeled shoes (M = 38.63, SD = 6.61) relative to flat-soled shoes (M = 36.45, SD = 6.73), paired-samples t(54) = 3.71, p < 0.001, d = 0.50. Within the data set, we identified three outliers who exhibited high heels-induced changes in lumbar curvature more than 2.5 standard deviations from the mean (e.g., a 10° decrease in lumbar curvature). We can only speculate about why high heels had such anomalous effects for these three women (e.g., they may have had very little experience wearing heels), but these aberrant data points were excluded from subsequent analyses. We computed attractiveness difference scores by subtracting each woman’s mean attractiveness rating while wearing flat-soled shoes from her mean attractiveness rating in heels. For lumbar curvature, the relevant variable was not the value of the curvature difference per se, but rather whether wearing high heels shifted the woman’s lumbar curvature closer to or further from the theoretical optimum of 45.5° proposed by Lewis et al. (2015). To capture this construct, we computed the absolute difference between 45.5° and the woman’s lumbar curvature in (1) flat-soled shoes and (2) high-heeled shoes, and then subtracted 2 from 1. A positive value on this index indicated that the woman’s lumbar curvature was closer to optimum in heels, whereas a negative value indicated that the woman’s lumbar curvature was further from optimum in heels.
    Statistical Analysis
    In high heels, women on average exhibited approximately 2° greater lumbar curvature (MD = 2.41, SED = 0.48), t(51) = 5.00, p < 0.001, d = 0.69, and were perceived to be more attractive (MD = 0.12, SED = 0.03), t(51) = 3.73, p < 0.001, d = 0.52. However, these results are not sufficient to test the prediction uniquely generated by the lumbar curvature hypothesis: that high heels’ influence on women’s attractiveness is contingent on whether wearing heels shifts the women’s lumbar curvature closer to optimum. An independent-samples t-test indicated that the effect of heels on women’s attractiveness differed depending on whether the women’s lumbar curvature was closer to or further from optimum in heels, t(50) = 2.73, p = 0.009, d = 0.84. Wearing high heels increased attractiveness only among those women for whom wearing heels shifted their lumbar curvature closer to optimum (MD = 0.17, SED = 0.03), t(36) = 4.95, p < 0.001, d = 0.82; high heels were not associated with increased attractiveness among women whose lumbar curvature was further from optimum in heels (MD = -0.01, SED = 0.06), t(14) = -0.17, p = 0.87, d = 0.04 (Figure 2).

    FIGURE 2

    FIGURE 2. Women were perceived as more attractive in high-heeled footwear only when wearing heels resulted in their lumbar curvature being closer to the theoretical optimum proposed by Lewis et al. (2015). Error bars = ±1SE. ∗p < 0.01, ∗∗p < 0.001.


    Discussion
    The current studies provide convergent evidence across methods and independent samples of a previously untested hypothesis about why women wear high heels. These studies provide the first documented evidence of high-heeled shoes’ concurrent effects on women’s lumbar curvature and attractiveness, and reveal a precise, lumbar curvature-dependent effect of high heels on women’s attractiveness.
    The current findings not only align tightly with a priori hypotheses generated based on evolutionary reasoning, but the design of Study 2 also intrinsically rules out several alternative hypotheses that appeal to folk psychology but have not been empirically substantiated. For example, the current findings cannot be attributed to the effect of high heels on women’s height or leg length (see Sear et al., 2004; Swami et al., 2006; Kiire, 2015). The cropping of the Study 2 photographs resulted in uniform heights and leg lengths across the within-woman photographic stimuli – yet a within-woman influence of high heels on attractiveness persisted.
    Moreover, because no high-heeled shoes were present in any of the Study 2 stimuli, the current findings cannot be explained by an association between high-heeled footwear and perceptions of women’s sexuality, a media-constructed preference for high-heeled shoes, or any other reason that men might have a preference for the shoes themselves. For the same reason, hypotheses suggesting that high heels influence men’s judgments of women because of the appearance (Abbey, 1987; Abbey et al., 1987; Shotland and Craig, 1988; Koukounas and Letch, 2001; Guéguen, 2011) or color (Niesta-Kayser et al., 2010; Guéguen, 2012) of the shoes cannot account for the current findings. The current findings – which were based entirely on static images – also cannot be explained by the gait hypothesis (Morris et al., 2013; see also Guéguen, 2015). Our experimental protocol was such that it could not have been the high-heeled shoes themselves, or their influence on gait, that influenced men’s perceptions of women’s attractiveness.
    The lumbar curvature hypothesis and the current studies tie together previously unrelated findings, demonstrate that several prima facie plausible alternative hypotheses cannot account for the observed findings, and provide a theoretically anchored explanation for one reason why wearing high heels affects women’s attractiveness.
    Limitations
    Because we cropped the photos above the women’s ankles and did not inform the raters of the nature of the difference between the photographs, we believe that they were unaware of the type of shoe that the women were wearing and of the fact that shoe type differed across the photographs. Nonetheless, because we did not directly assess whether raters were aware of the type of shoe that the women were wearing, this is a study limitation.
    Although cropping the photographs at the ankle enabled us to rule out several alternative explanations, the current research design cannot eliminate all potential confounds. For example, it is possible that in Study 2 the heels increased the women’s muscular tone. Indeed, improved muscle tone may be another reason why high heels influence women’s attractiveness. However, rather than undermining the current findings – which exhibit a lumbar-curvature dependent effect that cannot be explained by muscle tone – a consideration of heels’ effect on muscle tone may offer additional insight into the current findings. Similarly, heels may increase the protrusion of a woman’s breasts. However, like muscle tone, this cannot account for the precise, lumbar curvature-dependent effect of heels on attractiveness. Moreover, Lewis et al. (2015) demonstrated that stimuli that differed in lumbar curvature – but not breast protrusion – systematically differ in their attractiveness as a function of lumbar curvature. Future research may nonetheless benefit from attempting to disentangle these distinct potential influences of high heels on attractiveness. One possibility would be to employ photographic stimuli that present just the anterior or posterior of women’s torsos. However, such stimuli might suffer from a lack of ecological validity; presenting only half of a woman’s torso might be insufficient for activating the psychological mechanisms responsible for mate assessment. We await future research that disentangles these distinct potential influences on perceptions of attractiveness.
    As predicted, heels increased attractiveness among women whose lumbar curvature was shifted closer to optimum by the shoes, but not among women whose lumbar curvature was shifted further from optimum. However, we might have expected the latter group of women to have exhibited a decrease in attractiveness in heels. Current findings indicate that, for these women, the shoes neither increased nor decreased their attractiveness – not what we would expect if the only effect of high heels on women’s attractiveness were through lumbar curvature.
    Our current leading interpretation for this apparently null effect of heels for women whose lumbar curvature was pushed further from optimum is that it reflects a trade-off between the negative effects of the shift in lumbar curvature and the positive effects on other influences on attractiveness, such as muscle tone. This, of course, can only be a speculation for now and represents an important future direction. We hope that future research can further disentangle these and other potential high heel-based influences on attractiveness. For now, it is important to note that if muscle tone were the only high heels-based influence on women’s attractiveness, we should not observe the lumbar curvature-dependent effects we observed in this study. This indicates that muscle tone cannot fully account for these findings, and lumbar curvature must be at least part of the story.
    Future Directions
    We hope that future research continues to investigate lumbar curvature as an important attractiveness cue—one that may provide information relevant to solving multiple distinct adaptive problems. Lewis et al. (2015) hypothesis was motivated by a consideration of the adaptive problem of a bipedal fetal load; ancestrally, a woman’s angle of lumbar curvature would have been a reliable cue to her ability to solve pregnancy-related adaptive problems. However, lumbar curvature may also communicate information about a woman’s openness to mating advances; in many other mammalian species, lordosis behavior (i.e., arching of the lower back) is a signal of sexual proceptivity (see Ågmo and Ellingsen, 2003).
    Recent research (Lewis, 2017; Lewis et al., in preparation) has shown that women’s lumbar curvature increases in the presence of an attractive member of the opposite sex, an effect driven by women more strongly oriented toward short-term mating. Although Lewis and colleagues did not establish whether this shift in lumbar curvature influenced men’s perceptions of women’s attractiveness or openness to mating advances, there are theoretical reasons to believe that it might. Ancestrally, if lordosis behavior was a cue to a woman’s openness to mating advances, we should expect selection to have favored mechanisms in the male mind to attend to this type of behavior and to regulate perceptions of receptivity and attractiveness accordingly (e.g., see Goetz et al., 2012).
    Future research is therefore needed to disentangle whether selection favored the evolution of male psychological adaptations to attend to women’s lumbar curvature as a cue to (1) the ability to solve pregnancy-related adaptive problems, (2) openness to mating advances, or (3) both. The possibility that lumbar curvature is a cue to both may help account for the large shift in lumbar curvature observed in the uncontrolled celebrity images (Study 1) relative to the lab-based (Study 2) images. In the lab-based study in which female participants were assigned to wear heeled footwear, it is unlikely that they were signaling interest in mating. On the other hand, the images used in Study 1 were of celebrities who had elected to dress up in high heels. The women not only would have had their lumbar curvature shifted by the shoes, but their choice to wear high heels presumably reflected their motivation to enhance their physical appearance, which could include further behavioral arching of the back. We hope to see future work disentangle the pregnancy hypothesis (i.e., the hypothesis advanced by Lewis et al., 2015) and the mating interest hypothesis – the hypothesis that lordosis behavior is a signal of mating interest in human females.
    Conclusion
    The current studies illustrate how an evolutionary theoretical framework can move research toward a deeper understanding of the specific cues that influence humans’ psychology of attractiveness. By working from the starting point of a specific adaptive problem and a reliable morphological cue to the ability to solve that problem, researchers can generate tight, theoretically anchored hypotheses about specific features that should be important attractiveness cues.
    We hope that evolutionary research on human standards of attractiveness will proceed in this specific, systematic manner. It is known that men prioritize physical attractiveness worldwide in mate selection (Buss, 1989), but progress hinges on identifying critical cues that make up attractiveness. Initial research in this area focused on broad categories such as cues to “health.” However, being healthy requires the organism to solve a multitude of adaptive problems, each of which may be solved by different morphological structures with distinct observable cues. By anchoring attractiveness research in cues to the ability to solve specific adaptive problems, researchers can generate more precise hypotheses and predictions (see Lewis et al., 2017, p. 364). We hope that the current studies serve as a model example of this specific and systematic approach, and make a modest contribution to our understanding of human standards of attractiveness."
    -David M. G. Lewis, Eric M. Russell, Laith Al-Shawaf, Vivian Ta, Zeynep Senveli, William Ickes and David M. Buss, "Why Women Wear High Heels: Evolution, Lumbar Curvature, and Attractiveness", Front. Psychol., 8:1875, 13 November 2017: https://doi.org/10.3389/fpsyg.2017.01875



    _________________
    « La question n’est pas de constater que les gens vivent plus ou moins pauvrement, mais toujours d’une manière qui leur échappe. »
    -Guy Debord, Critique de la séparation (1961).

    Johnathan R. Razorback
    Johnathan R. Razorback
    Admin

    Messages : 7712
    Date d'inscription : 12/08/2013
    Localisation : France

    David M. G. Lewis, Eric M. Russell, Laith Al-Shawaf, Vivian Ta, Zeynep Senveli, William Ickes and David M. Buss, Why Women Wear High Heels: Evolution, Lumbar Curvature, and Attractiveness Empty Re: David M. G. Lewis, Eric M. Russell, Laith Al-Shawaf, Vivian Ta, Zeynep Senveli, William Ickes and David M. Buss, Why Women Wear High Heels: Evolution, Lumbar Curvature, and Attractiveness

    Message par Johnathan R. Razorback le Lun 9 Mar - 17:57

    "En dépit de l'utilisation largement répandue des chaussures à talons hauts dans les sociétés en développement et modernisées, nous n'avons qu'une compréhension incomplète de ce phénomène comportemental, tant au niveau de l'explication proximale que distale. Le présent manuscrit avance et teste une nouvelle hypothèse évolutionniste concernant les raisons pour lesquelles les femmes portent des talons hauts, et apporte un soutien convergent à cette hypothèse à travers de multiples méthodes. À partir d'une préférence évolutive récemment découverte pour le partenaire, nous avons émis l'hypothèse que les talons hauts influencent l'attrait des femmes par le biais des effets produits par la perception de leur courbure lombaire. Des études indépendantes utilisant des méthodes distinctes, éliminant de multiples facteurs de confusion et excluant d'autres explications, ont montré que lorsque les femmes portent des talons hauts, leur courbure lombaire augmente et elles sont perçues comme plus attirantes. Une analyse plus approfondie a révélé un modèle encore plus précis s'alignant sur la psychologie humaine évolutionniste: les chaussures à talons hauts n'augmentent l'attrait des femmes que lorsque le port de talons modifie leur courbure lombaire pour se rapprocher d'un angle optimal du point de vue de l'évolution. Ces résultats illustrent comment la psychologie humaine évolutionniste peut contribuer et se croiser avec des aspects de l'évolution culturelle, en révélant que les deux ne sont pas des processus indépendants ou autonomes mais plutôt profondément imbriqués.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Proximate_and_ultimate_causation

    Introduction

    "La beauté d'une femme ne réside pas dans une exagération des zones spécialisées, ni dans une harmonie générale qui pourrait être élaborée au moyen de la sectio aurea ou d'une superstition esthétique similaire ; mais dans l'arabesque de la colonne vertébrale."
    -John Updike, Plumes de pigeon et autres histoires.

    https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Updike

    L'utilisation par les femmes de chaussures à talons hauts est un phénomène répandu dans les sociétés en développement comme dans les sociétés modernisées (Miller, 1990 ; Freeman, 1999). Rien qu'aux États-Unis, plus de 8 000 000 000 $ sont dépensés chaque année pour des chaussures à talons hauts (Rossi, 1993). Plusieurs chercheurs (par exemple, Roth, 1929 ; Smith, 1999 ; Morris et al., 2013 ; Guéguen, 2015) ont avancé des hypothèses sur la fonction des chaussures à talons hauts pour les femmes. Ces idées vont de la proposition d'associations médiatiques entre les talons hauts et la sexualité (par exemple, Smith, 1999) à des influences sur des propriétés biomécaniques spécifiques de la démarche des femmes (par exemple, Morris et al., 2013). Cependant, ces chercheurs n'ont pas testé leurs idées de manière empirique ou ont trouvé des résultats suggérant que les raisons pour lesquelles les femmes portent des talons hauts n'incluent pas celles qu'ils ont émise (par exemple, voir Morris et al., 2013 ; Guéguen, 2015). En bref, malgré la prévalence généralisée des talons hauts, les raisons pour lesquelles les femmes portent des talons hauts ne sont pas bien comprises.

    Les recherches récentes de Lewis et al. (2015) peuvent donner un aperçu de ce phénomène inexpliqué. Lewis et al. (2015) ont pris en considération un problème d'adaptation auquel sont confrontées uniquement les femelles hominidés bipèdes : (1) un centre de masse qui se déplace vers l'avant pendant la grossesse, et (2) une adaptation morphologique qui a évolué pour résoudre ce problème d'adaptation : le coincement [Wedging] dans la troisième à la dernière vertèbre lombaire de la femme (Whitcome et al., 2007).

    [un glissement de la troisième à la dernière vertèbre lombaire de la femme ?]

    Ces chercheurs ont estimé que les femmes ancestrales qui possédaient un degré intermédiaire de coincement vertébral auraient bénéficié d'importants avantages sur le plan de la condition physique, comme la possibilité de mener à bien plusieurs grossesses sans souffrir de lésions de la colonne vertébrale et la possibilité de s'alimenter plus longtemps pendant la grossesse. Les avantages en termes de condition physique dont ces femmes ont bénéficié auraient à leur tour créé des conditions sélectives (du point de vue de l'évolution) d'une préférence des hommes envers ces femmes. Ancestralement, la courbure lombaire d'une femme aurait été un indice fiable et observable du coincement de ses vertèbres (George et al., 2003). Sur cette base, Lewis et al. (2015) ont émis l'hypothèse que les hommes ont une préférence évoluée pour un angle lombaire d'environ 45,5° - une valeur qui indique la capacité à déplacer le centre de gravité vers l'arrière, au-dessus des hanches, et qui évite simultanément les problèmes d'adaptation liés à une courbure lombaire excessive (hyperlordose) et à une courbure lombaire insuffisante (hypolordose). À l'appui de leur hypothèse, Lewis et al. (2015) ont constaté que l'attraction des hommes envers les femmes atteint son maximum à cet angle - l'angle optimal pour aider les femmes ancestrales à atténuer les coûts biomécaniques d'une charge fœtale bipède et à minimiser la probabilité d'hyperlordose et d'hypolordose.

    Si la courbure lombaire est un indice d'attractivité important, et si les femmes possèdent des mécanismes psychologiques de promotion de leur apparence physique (voir Singh et Bronstad, 1997), alors on peut s'attendre à ce que les femmes tentent de manipuler leur courbure lombaire de manière à accroître la perception de leur attractivité. De manière indépendante, des chercheurs s'intéressant à la biomécanique et à l'ergonomie ont proposé que les chaussures à talons hauts augmentent la courbure lombaire (par exemple, Lee et al., 2001). Ensemble, ces idées donnent lieu à une nouvelle hypothèse sur les raisons pour lesquelles les femmes portent des talons hauts : les femmes peuvent augmenter leur attractivité en manipulant leur courbure lombaire avec des chaussures à talons hauts.

    Pour tester cette hypothèse, nous avons mené deux études indépendantes, l'une utilisant des photos d'archives provenant d'Internet, et la seconde employant une méthode contrôlée en laboratoire.

    Étude 1
    Introduction
    Talons hauts et courbure lombaire

    Jusqu'à présent, les conclusions relatives à la relation entre la courbure lombaire et les chaussures à talons hauts ont été équivoques (Russell, 2010). Elles ont été basées sur de petits échantillons (par exemple, 11 participants), ont utilisé des mesures de faible validité (Fedorak et al., 2003) et ont produit des résultats mitigés (par exemple, Snow et Williams, 1994). Ainsi, bien que la croyance selon laquelle les chaussures à talons hauts sont associées à une plus grande courbure lombaire soit largement répandue, on manque de preuves fiables étayant cette relation (voir Russell, 2010 pour un examen). Le premier objectif de cette étude était donc d'étudier la relation entre le port de talons hauts et la courbure lombaire.

    Talons hauts, courbure lombaire et attractivité

    Les recherches de Lewis et al. (2015) établissent l'importance de la courbure lombaire comme indice d'attractivité, mais à ce jour, aucune étude n'a mesuré simultanément la courbure lombaire et l'attractivité des femmes en fonction de l'utilisation de chaussures à talons hauts. Le deuxième objectif central de l'étude 1 était donc d'établir si les femmes sont perçues comme plus attirantes lorsqu'elles portent des talons hauts.

    Matériaux et méthodes

    Cette étude a été réalisée conformément aux recommandations du Conseil de révision institutionnelle de l'Université du Texas à Austin. Conformément à la déclaration d'Helsinki, tous les participants ont donné leur consentement éclairé. Comme les données ont été collectées en ligne, les participants ont indiqué leur consentement par voie électronique au lieu de fournir une signature écrite. Tous les participants ont indiqué leur consentement de cette manière, et le protocole a été approuvé par le Conseil de révision institutionnelle de l'Université du Texas.

    Stimulants photographiques

    Des photos de femmes portant des talons hauts et des chaussures à semelles plates ont été téléchargées sur des sites web accessibles au public sur Internet (liens disponibles sur demande). Comme les différences individuelles d'apparence physique sont suffisamment importantes pour rendre indétectables les effets des chaussures à talons hauts sur l'attractivité (par exemple, en comparant l'attractivité d'une femme en chaussures plates à celle d'une autre femme en talons), nous avons utilisé un modèle intraféminin. Pour ce faire, nous avons dû trouver sur Internet des images de la même femme photographiée deux fois, une fois en talons et une fois en chaussures plates. Nous devions également pouvoir évaluer la courbure lombaire des femmes, qui ne peut être mesurée que de côté, comme sur les photos de profil. Ces contraintes ont fait des femmes célèbres une source de données idéale ; une sélection suffisamment large de photographies de femmes célèbres était disponible sur Internet pour identifier deux photographies de chaque femme, une en talons et une sans, et les deux de profil. Pour chaque célébrité, nous avons sélectionné les premières images de profil de la femme en talons et en chaussures plates, respectivement, que la recherche Google a permis de trouver. Nous avons effectué cette procédure pour 15 célébrités féminines différentes (liste disponible sur demande), ce qui a donné un ensemble total de 30 images.

    Mesures de la courbure lombaire:

    Nous avons mesuré la courbure lombaire des femmes en superposant un rapporteur virtuel (Screen Protractor, Iconico, Inc.) sur une ligne parallèle au haut du bas du dos et une ligne parallèle au haut des fesses, une opérationnalisation de la courbure lombaire utilisée dans les milieux orthopédiques cliniques (voir par exemple George et al., 2003).

    Évaluations de l'attractivité et des cotes:

    Cent vingt-six hommes (Mage = 19,77, SDage = 4,00, fourchette = 17-52) ont évalué l'attrait des stimuli photographiques. Les évaluateurs ont été répartis au hasard entre les 15 cibles portant des chaussures à semelles plates et les 15 cibles portant des chaussures à talons hauts. Les images ont été présentées dans un ordre aléatoire aux évaluateurs, qui ont évalué l'attractivité de chaque cible sur une échelle de 10 points (1 = extrêmement peu attractif, 10 = extrêmement attractif).

    Résultats:

    Nous avons d'abord voulu vérifier si la courbure lombaire des femmes était plus importante lorsqu'elles portaient des chaussures à talons hauts que lorsqu'elles portaient des chaussures à semelles plates. Un test t sur deux échantillons a révélé que la courbure lombaire des femmes portant des chaussures à talons hauts (M = 43,37, ET = 9,06) était supérieure à celle des femmes portant des chaussures à semelles plates (M = 30,64, ET = 7,71), t(14) = 4,48, p = 0,001, d = 1,16. Ensuite, nous avons testé si les femmes étaient perçues comme plus attirantes en talons hauts qu'en chaussures plates. Les femmes étaient perçues comme plus attirantes lorsqu'elles portaient des talons hauts (M = 7,37, ET = 0,69) que lorsqu'elles étaient en appartement (M = 6,47, ET = 1,11), t(14) = 3,10, p = 0,008, d = 0,94.

    Étude 2
    Introduction

    Les résultats de l'étude 1 fournissent les premières preuves simultanées des relations entre (1) les talons hauts et la courbure lombaire et (2) les talons hauts et le charme physique. Toutefois, ces résultats sont basés sur des photographies qui diffèrent non seulement en ce qui concerne les chaussures des femmes, mais aussi de nombreuses autres variables qui influencent l'apparence physique des femmes (par exemple, les cosmétiques, la nature révélatrice des vêtements). Par conséquent, la relation observée dans l'étude 1 entre le fait de porter des talons hauts et le fait d'être perçu comme plus attirant entraîne les préoccupations connexes concernant la directionnalité et le problème de la troisième variable. Sur la base de ces limites de l'étude 1, nous avons mené une deuxième étude contrôlée en laboratoire pour mieux isoler et établir (1) l'effet des talons hauts sur la courbure lombaire, (2) la relation entre les talons hauts et l'attractivité, et (3) le rôle que joue la courbure lombaire dans la relation talons hauts - attractivité.

    Pourquoi les talons hauts augmentent la séduction ?

    D'autres chercheurs ont avancé que les chaussures à talons hauts augmentent l'attractivité des femmes, mais ont soit négligé d'expliquer pourquoi elles augmentent l'attractivité (par exemple, Roth, 1929 ; Smith, 1999), soit ont avancé des hypothèses qui ne sont pas cohérentes avec les données existantes. Par exemple, Morris et ses collaborateurs (2013) émettent l'hypothèse que les talons hauts augmentent l'attractivité des femmes grâce à leurs effets sur des propriétés biomécaniques spécifiques de la démarche des femmes. En accord avec l'idée que les talons hauts augmentent l'attractivité des femmes, Morris et al. (2013, p. 180) ont constaté que les femmes étaient perçues comme plus attirantes en talons. Cependant, ils n'ont trouvé "aucun modèle cohérent de corrélation entre les mesures biomécaniques et les jugements d'attractivité des marcheurs individuels". Guéguen (2015) a ensuite prétendu tester l'hypothèse de Morris et ses collègues. Guéguen a mené plusieurs études documentant un lien entre (1) les femmes portant des talons hauts et (2) les hommes adoptant des comportements considérés comme des indicateurs d'une attraction accrue. Par exemple, dans deux études, il a démontré que les hommes étaient plus susceptibles de vouloir participer à une enquête lorsque la sollicitation pour participer venait d'une femme portant des talons hauts plutôt que des chaussures à semelles plates. Il est important de noter qu'il a obtenu ces résultats en utilisant des femmes qui étaient "stationnées" devant un magasin de détail et qui demandaient aux passants de participer - il a obtenu ces résultats sans indices de démarche. Les conclusions de Morris et al. (2013) et de Guéguen (2015) selon lesquelles les talons hauts augmentent l'attractivité en l'absence d'indices de la démarche fournissent des preuves solides que l'hypothèse de la démarche, même si elle est partiellement correcte, ne peut pas expliquer l'effet des talons hauts sur l'attractivité des femmes en l'absence d'indices de la démarche. Il doit y avoir d'autres raisons pour lesquelles les talons hauts augmentent l'attractivité des femmes, qui n'ont pas encore été identifiées.

    L'hypothèse de la courbure lombaire représente une explication possible. En outre, l'hypothèse de la courbure lombaire permet de faire des prévisions a priori uniques et spécifiques sur l'effet des talons hauts sur l'attractivité des femmes. Alors que d'autres hypothèses génèrent la prédiction générale que les femmes seront perçues comme plus attirantes lorsqu'elles portent des talons hauts, l'hypothèse de la courbure lombaire offre un ensemble de prédictions plus nuancées. Les hommes ne préfèrent pas simplement une plus grande courbure lombaire. Lewis et ses collaborateurs (2015) montrent plutôt que l'attirance des hommes pour les femmes augmente à mesure que la courbure lombaire des femmes se rapproche de la valeur optimale théorique proposée, à savoir 45,5°. Si les hommes sont attirés par les femmes en talons hauts en partie parce que les talons influencent la courbure lombaire des femmes, alors nous devrions nous attendre à ce que les talons hauts n'augmentent l'attrait des femmes que lorsque le port de talons rapproche leur courbure lombaire de l'optimum théorique, mais pas lorsque les talons éloignent la courbure de cet optimum.

    Pour tester ces prédictions, contrôler les autres influences potentielles des talons hauts sur l'attractivité et exclure d'autres hypothèses, nous avons mené une deuxième étude contrôlée en laboratoire.

    […]

    Participants :
    Cinquante-six femmes (Mage = 19,36, SDage = 1,77, tranche d'âge = 18-26) ont été recrutées dans une grande université publique du sud-ouest des États-Unis et ont reçu un crédit partiel de cours pour leur participation.

    Procédure :

    Les participants ont été invités à se présenter à leur séance de laboratoire prévue dans des vêtements adaptés à leur forme (par exemple, des jeans serrés, des pantalons de yoga, des tee-shirts sans sac) avec une paire de leurs propres chaussures à semelles plates (par exemple, des chaussures de tennis). À leur arrivée au laboratoire, les participants ont été accueillis par un assistant de recherche et on leur a dit qu'ils allaient participer à une étude sur l'apparence des femmes. Les participants ont été emmenés individuellement dans une salle privée pour être photographiés. Deux photos ont été prises de chaque participant, une fois dans des chaussures à semelles plates et une fois dans des chaussures à talons. Pour chaque photo, l'assistant a demandé à la participante de se tenir contre le mur, le côté droit de son corps faisant face au mur. L'assistant a ensuite pris une photo de profil du corps entier. Les mêmes instructions ont été utilisées pour les deux photographies.

    Stimulants photographiques :

    Nous avons généré un ensemble de stimulus de deux images pour chaque participante. Une image a été générée à partir de la photo de la femme en talons et l'autre à partir de sa photo en chaussures à semelles plates (Figure 1). [cf la photographie dans l'article d'origine]

    Afin de préserver la confidentialité des participants sur les images présentées à l'échantillon indépendant d'évaluateurs masculins, nous avons supprimé de chaque photo la partie du corps de la femme située au-dessus des épaules à l'aide de l'outil de recadrage d'Adobe Photoshop. Nous avons également recadré les photos à la hauteur des chevilles des femmes. Il s'agissait là d'une partie essentielle de la conception de l'étude pour plusieurs raisons. Premièrement, si les hommes ont une préférence pour la taille des femmes, et que les talons modifient la taille des femmes, alors toute relation potentielle entre les chaussures à talons hauts et l'attrait des femmes pourrait être attribuable à l'effet des talons sur leur taille. De même, si les longues jambes sont un indice de jeunesse (Sear et al., 2004), que les hommes ont une préférence pour ces indices chez les femmes (Swami et al., 2006 ; Kiire, 2015) et que les talons hauts augmentent la distance entre le sol et le haut de la jambe, alors tout lien entre la séduction et les chaussures des talons pourrait potentiellement résulter de ces relations. Le recadrage des photographies aux chevilles des femmes - qui fait que les deux images de chaque femme ont la même hauteur et la même longueur de jambe - élimine ces deux facteurs de confusion potentiels.

    Deuxièmement, si les hommes sont eux-mêmes attirés par les chaussures à talons hauts, indépendamment des effets qu'elles ont sur d'autres éléments de l'apparence féminine tels que la courbure lombaire, alors l'inclusion de la chaussure dans les stimuli photographiques pourrait influencer les perceptions de l'attrait des femmes.

    Évaluateurs et évaluations de l'attractivité:

    Quatre-vingt-deux hommes (Mage = 20,14, SDage = 2,43, fourchette = 17-31) ont évalué l'attrait des stimuli photographiques. Ces participants ont rempli la tâche d'évaluation en ligne et ont visionné les 112 images dans un ordre aléatoire, l'ordre étant à nouveau aléatoire pour chaque évaluateur. Les participants ont évalué l'attrait de la femme représentée dans chaque photographie sur une échelle de 10 points (1 = extrêmement peu attrayant, 10 = extrêmement attirant).

    Mesures de la courbure lombaire :

    Nous avons mesuré la courbure lombaire des femmes en suivant le même protocole que celui de l'étude 1.

    Résultats:

    Préparation des données
    En moyenne, la courbure lombaire des femmes a augmenté dans les chaussures à talons hauts (M = 38,63, ET = 6,61) par rapport aux chaussures à semelles plates (M = 36,45, ET = 6,73), les échantillons appariés t(54) = 3,71, p < 0,001, d = 0,50. Dans l'ensemble des données, nous avons identifié trois cas aberrants qui présentaient des changements de la courbure lombaire induits par les talons hauts de plus de 2,5 écarts types par rapport à la moyenne (par exemple, une diminution de 10° de la courbure lombaire). Nous ne pouvons que spéculer sur les raisons pour lesquelles les talons hauts ont eu des effets aussi anormaux pour ces trois femmes (par exemple, elles ont peut-être eu très peu d'expérience du port de talons), mais ces points de données aberrants ont été exclus des analyses ultérieures. Nous avons calculé les points de différence d'attractivité en soustrayant la cote moyenne d'attractivité de chaque femme portant des chaussures à semelles plates de sa cote moyenne d'attractivité en talons. Pour la courbure lombaire, la variable pertinente n'était pas la valeur de la différence de courbure en soi, mais plutôt le fait de savoir si le port de talons hauts rapprochait ou éloignait la courbure lombaire de la femme de l'optimum théorique de 45,5° proposé par Lewis et al. (2015). Pour saisir cette construction, nous avons calculé la différence absolue entre 45,5° et la courbure lombaire de la femme dans (1) les chaussures à semelles plates et (2) les chaussures à talons hauts, puis nous avons soustrait 2 de 1. Une valeur positive de cet indice indiquait que la courbure lombaire de la femme était plus proche de l'optimum en talons, tandis qu'une valeur négative indiquait que la courbure lombaire de la femme était plus éloignée de l'optimum en talons.

    Analyse statistique:

    Avec des talons hauts, les femmes présentaient en moyenne une courbure lombaire supérieure d'environ 2° (MD = 2,41, SED = 0,48), t(51) = 5,00, p < 0,001, d = 0,69, et étaient perçues comme étant plus attirantes (MD = 0,12, SED = 0,03), t(51) = 3,73, p < 0,001, d = 0,52. Toutefois, ces résultats ne sont pas suffisants pour tester la prédiction générée uniquement par l'hypothèse de la courbure lombaire : l'influence des talons hauts sur l'attractivité des femmes dépend de la question de savoir si le port de talons rapproche la courbure lombaire des femmes de l'optimum. Un test t sur des échantillons indépendants a indiqué que l'effet des talons sur l'attractivité des femmes différait selon que la courbure lombaire des femmes était plus ou moins proche de l'optimum en matière de talons, t(50) = 2,73, p = 0,009, d = 0,84. Le port de talons hauts n'a augmenté l'attractivité que chez les femmes pour lesquelles le port de talons a rapproché leur courbure lombaire de l'optimum (MD = 0,17, SED = 0,03), t(36) = 4,95, p < 0,001, d = 0.82 ; les talons hauts n'étaient pas associés à une augmentation de l'attractivité chez les femmes dont la courbure lombaire était plus éloignée de l'optimum en talons (MD = -0,01, SED = 0,06), t(14) = -0,17, p = 0,87, d = 0,04 (figure 2).

    [FIGURE 2]

    Discussion :

    Les études actuelles fournissent des preuves convergentes entre les méthodes et des échantillons indépendants d'une hypothèse jusqu'alors non vérifiée sur les raisons pour lesquelles les femmes portent des talons hauts. Ces études fournissent les premières preuves documentées des effets simultanés des chaussures à talons hauts sur la courbure lombaire et le charme des femmes, et révèlent un effet du port des talons sur la séduction que dégagent les femmes, par la médiation de la modification de la courbure lombaire.

    Non seulement les résultats actuels s'alignent étroitement sur les hypothèses a priori générées sur la base d'un raisonnement évolutif, mais la conception de l'étude 2 écarte aussi intrinsèquement plusieurs hypothèses alternatives qui font appel à la psychologie populaire mais qui n'ont pas été étayées empiriquement. Par exemple, les résultats actuels ne peuvent être attribués à l'effet des talons hauts sur la taille ou la longueur des jambes des femmes (voir Sear et al., 2004 ; Swami et al., 2006 ; Kiire, 2015). Le recadrage des photographies de l'étude 2 a permis d'obtenir des hauteurs et des longueurs de jambes uniformes dans les stimuli photographiques intraféminins - pourtant, l'influence des talons hauts sur l'attractivité intraféminine a persisté.

    De plus, comme aucun talon haut n'était présent dans les stimuli de l'étude 2, les résultats actuels ne peuvent pas être expliqués par une association entre les talons hauts et les perceptions de la sexualité des femmes, une préférence médiatique pour les talons hauts, ou toute autre raison qui pourrait expliquer que les hommes aient une préférence pour les chaussures elles-mêmes. Pour la même raison, les hypothèses suggérant que les talons hauts influencent le jugement des hommes sur les femmes en raison de l'apparence (Abbey, 1987 ; Abbey et al., 1987 ; Shotland et Craig, 1988 ; Koukounas et Letch, 2001 ; Guéguen, 2011) ou de la couleur (Niesta-Kayser et al., 2010 ; Guéguen, 2012) des chaussures ne peuvent pas expliquer les résultats actuels. Les résultats actuels - qui sont entièrement basés sur des images statiques - ne peuvent pas non plus être expliqués par l'hypothèse de la démarche (Morris et al., 2013 ; voir également Guéguen, 2015). Notre protocole expérimental était tel que ce ne sont pas les chaussures à talons hauts elles-mêmes, ni leur influence sur la démarche, qui ont pu influencer la perception qu'ont les hommes de l'attractivité des femmes.

    […]

    Limitations :

    Comme nous avons recadré les photos au-dessus des chevilles des femmes et que nous n'avons pas informé les évaluateurs de la nature de la différence entre les photos, nous pensons qu'ils n'étaient pas au courant du type de chaussures que les femmes portaient et du fait que le type de chaussures différait d'une photo à l'autre. Néanmoins, comme nous n'avons pas évalué directement si les évaluateurs connaissaient le type de chaussures que les femmes portaient, il s'agit d'une limite de l'étude.

    Bien que le recadrage des photographies à la cheville nous ait permis d'écarter plusieurs explications possibles, la conception actuelle de la recherche ne peut pas éliminer toutes les confusions potentielles. Par exemple, il est possible que dans l'étude 2, les talons aient augmenté le tonus musculaire des femmes. En effet, l'amélioration du tonus musculaire peut être une autre raison pour laquelle les talons hauts influencent l'attractivité des femmes. Cependant, plutôt que de saper les résultats actuels - qui montrent un effet dépendant de la courbure lombaire qui ne peut pas être expliqué par le tonus musculaire - une considération de l'effet des talons sur le tonus musculaire peut offrir un aperçu supplémentaire des résultats actuels. De même, les talons peuvent augmenter la protubérance des seins d'une femme. Cependant, comme le tonus musculaire, cela ne peut pas expliquer l'effet précis des talons sur l'attractivité, qui dépend de la courbure lombaire. De plus, Lewis et ses collaborateurs (2015) ont démontré que les stimuli qui diffèrent en termes de courbure lombaire - mais pas de protrusion mammaire - diffèrent systématiquement en termes d'attractivité en fonction de la courbure lombaire. Les recherches futures pourraient néanmoins bénéficier d'une tentative de démêler ces influences potentielles distinctes des talons hauts sur l'attractivité. Une possibilité serait d'utiliser des stimuli photographiques qui ne présentent que la partie antérieure ou postérieure du torse des femmes. Cependant, de tels stimuli pourraient souffrir d'un manque de validité psychologique ; présenter seulement la moitié du torse d'une femme pourrait être insuffisant pour activer les mécanismes psychologiques responsables de l'évaluation du partenaire. Nous attendons les futures recherches qui permettront de démêler ces influences potentielles distinctes sur les perceptions de l'attractivité.

    Comme prévu, les talons augmentent l'attractivité chez les femmes dont la courbure lombaire a été rapprochée de l'optimum par les chaussures, mais pas chez les femmes dont la courbure lombaire a été éloignée de l'optimum. Cependant, on aurait pu s'attendre à ce que ce dernier groupe de femmes enregistre une diminution de son attrait lorsqu'elles portent des talons. Les résultats actuels indiquent que, pour ces femmes, les chaussures n'ont ni augmenté ni diminué leur attrait - ce qui n'est pas ce à quoi on pourrait s'attendre si le seul effet des talons hauts sur l'attractivité des femmes provenait de la courbure lombaire.

    Notre principale interprétation actuelle de cet effet apparemment nul des talons pour les femmes dont la courbure lombaire a été repoussée plus loin que l'optimum est qu'il reflète un équilibre entre les effets négatifs du déplacement de la courbure lombaire et les effets positifs sur d'autres influences sur l'attractivité, comme le tonus musculaire. Bien entendu, il ne peut s'agir que d'une spéculation pour le moment et cette hypothèse représente une orientation importante pour la recherche future. Nous espérons que la recherche future pourra démêler davantage ces influences et d'autres influences potentielles sur l'attractivité basées sur les talons hauts. Pour l'instant, il est important de noter que si le tonus musculaire était la seule influence des talons hauts sur l'attractivité des femmes, nous ne devrions pas observer les effets dépendant de la courbure lombaire que nous avons observés dans cette étude. Cela indique que le tonus musculaire ne peut pas expliquer entièrement ces résultats, et la courbure lombaire doit au moins faire partie de l'histoire.

    Orientations futures :

    Nous espérons que les recherches futures continueront à étudier la courbure lombaire en tant qu'indice d'attractivité important - un indice qui pourrait fournir des informations pertinentes pour résoudre de multiples problèmes d'adaptation distincts. L'hypothèse de Lewis et al. (2015) a été motivée par la prise en compte du problème d'adaptation d'une charge fœtale bipède ; ancestralement, l'angle de courbure lombaire d'une femme aurait été un indice fiable de sa capacité à résoudre les problèmes d'adaptation liés à la grossesse. Cependant, la courbure lombaire peut également communiquer des informations sur l'ouverture d'une femme aux propositions d'accouplement ; chez de nombreuses autres espèces de mammifères, le comportement de lordose (c'est-à-dire la cambrure du bas du dos) est un signal de réceptivité sexuelle (voir Ågmo et Ellingsen, 2003).

    Des recherches récentes (Lewis, 2017 ; Lewis et al., en préparation) ont montré que la courbure lombaire des femmes augmente en présence d'un membre attirant du sexe opposé, un effet dû aux femmes plus fortement orientées vers l'accouplement à court terme. Bien que Lewis et ses collègues n'aient pas établi si cette modification de la courbure lombaire influençait la perception qu'ont les hommes de l'attrait des femmes ou de leur ouverture aux suggestions d'accouplement, il existe des raisons théoriques de penser que c'est possible. Ancestralement, si le comportement de lordose était un indice de l'ouverture d'une femme aux suggestions d'accouplement, nous devrions nous attendre à ce que la sélection ait favorisé des mécanismes dans l'esprit des hommes pour faire attention à ce type de comportement et pour réguler les perceptions de la réceptivité et de l'attractivité en conséquence (par exemple, voir Goetz et al., 2012).

    Des recherches futures sont donc nécessaires pour déterminer si la sélection a favorisé l'évolution des adaptations psychologiques masculines pour tenir compte de la courbure lombaire des femmes comme indice (1) de la capacité à résoudre les problèmes d'adaptation liés à la grossesse, (2) de l'ouverture aux suggestions d'accouplement, ou (3) des deux. La possibilité que la courbure lombaire soit un indice des deux peut aider à expliquer le grand changement de courbure lombaire observé dans les images de célébrités non contrôlées (étude 1) par rapport aux images de laboratoire (étude 2). Dans l'étude en laboratoire où les participantes ont été amenées à porter des chaussures à talons, il est peu probable qu'elles aient manifesté de l'intérêt pour l'accouplement. En revanche, les images utilisées dans l'étude 1 étaient celles de célébrités qui avaient choisi de s'habiller avec des talons hauts. Non seulement la courbure lombaire de ces femmes aurait été déplacée par les chaussures, mais leur choix de porter des talons hauts reflétait probablement leur motivation à améliorer leur apparence physique, ce qui pourrait impliquer une plus grande cambrure comportementale du dos. Nous espérons voir les travaux futurs démêler l'hypothèse de la grossesse (c'est-à-dire l'hypothèse avancée par Lewis et al., 2015) et l'hypothèse de l'intérêt pour l'accouplement - l'hypothèse selon laquelle le comportement de lordose est un signal d'intérêt pour l'accouplement chez les femelles humaines.

    Conclusion :

    Les études actuelles illustrent comment un cadre théorique évolutionniste peut faire progresser la recherche vers une compréhension plus approfondie des indices spécifiques qui influencent la psychologie de l'attractivité chez les humains. En travaillant à partir d'un problème d'adaptation spécifique et d'un indice morphologique fiable pour résoudre ce problème, les chercheurs peuvent générer des hypothèses rigoureuses, ancrées dans la théorie, sur des caractéristiques spécifiques qui devraient être des indices d'attractivité importants.

    Nous espérons que la recherche évolutionniste sur les normes humaines d'attractivité se déroulera de cette manière spécifique et systématique. On sait que, dans le monde entier, les hommes accordent la priorité à l'attrait physique pour la sélection de leur partenaire (Buss, 1989), mais les progrès de la connaissance dépendent de l'identification des indices critiques qui constituent cette attractivité. Les premières recherches dans ce domaine se sont concentrées sur de grandes catégories telles que les indices de "santé". Cependant, pour être en bonne santé, l'organisme doit résoudre une multitude de problèmes d'adaptation, chacun d'entre eux pouvant être résolu par des structures morphologiques différentes avec des indices observables distincts. En ancrant la recherche sur l'attractivité dans les indices à la capacité de résoudre des problèmes adaptatifs spécifiques, les chercheurs peuvent générer des hypothèses et des prévisions plus précises (voir Lewis et al., 2017, p. 364). Nous espérons que les études actuelles serviront de modèle exemplaire à cette approche spécifique et systématique, et qu'elles contribueront modestement à notre compréhension des normes humaines en matière de séduction.
    -David M. G. Lewis, Eric M. Russell, Laith Al-Shawaf, Vivian Ta, Zeynep Senveli, William Ickes and David M. Buss, "Why Women Wear High Heels: Evolution, Lumbar Curvature, and Attractiveness", Front. Psychol., 8:1875, 13 November 2017: https://doi.org/10.3389/fpsyg.2017.01875




    _________________
    « La question n’est pas de constater que les gens vivent plus ou moins pauvrement, mais toujours d’une manière qui leur échappe. »
    -Guy Debord, Critique de la séparation (1961).


      La date/heure actuelle est Dim 17 Jan - 13:11