L'Académie nouvelle

Vous souhaitez réagir à ce message ? Créez un compte en quelques clics ou connectez-vous pour continuer.
L'Académie nouvelle

Forum d'archivage politique et scientifique

Le deal à ne pas rater :
Coffret Pokémon Bundle 6 Boosters EV05 Forces Temporelles : où ...
Voir le deal

    Donald A. Crosby, The Philosophy of William James. Radical Empiricism and Radical Materialism

    Johnathan R. Razorback
    Johnathan R. Razorback
    Admin


    Messages : 18919
    Date d'inscription : 12/08/2013
    Localisation : France

    Donald A. Crosby, The Philosophy of William James. Radical Empiricism and Radical Materialism	 Empty Donald A. Crosby, The Philosophy of William James. Radical Empiricism and Radical Materialism

    Message par Johnathan R. Razorback Lun 23 Jan - 14:21



    "James was especially concerned to expose to critical scrutiny assumptions about the self and its relations to the world that lead us astray and bar us from directing our inquiries toward the concreteness, depth, and fullness of experience in all of its dimensions. He was a relentless foe of the reduction of mental processes to the theoretical descriptions of physics and of the kind of materialistic metaphysics that is committed to the causal closure of the physical and that can thus find no place for genuinely free, reason-guided choices by the human self among relevant alternatives. He was profoundly open to and respectful of theories and findings in the natural sciences such as those of Newtonian physics, Darwinian biology, and the neurophysiological researches of his day, but he was insistent throughout his life that these developments and findings be supplemented with what he regarded as perceptive insights and critical perspectives of other important fields of thought and awareness such as the arts, morality, religion, and philosophy. Above all, he insisted that those who are committed to thinking deeply about the self and its relations to the world should stay in constant close touch with the disclosures, practices, and demands of ordinary, day-to-day life. He wanted to develop a philosophy that was not just carefully thought about and critically defended but that could also be successfully put into practice and lived.

    My principal focus in this book is on the philosophy of William James as it relates to his conceptions of “pure” and ordinary experience, the respective natures of self and world, and the interrelations of experience, self, and world. I provide explications and critical interpretations of these themes in James’s philosophy and, when I think appropriate, make substantive suggestions for their clarification and improvement. I defend the thesis that these themes offer a promising basis for building a credible philosophy of mind and its relations to the world. They are an excellent starting point or springboard for such a philosophy, although they should not and cannot be considered a place to stop or remain. Along the way I consider some recent objections to empiricism as an epistemological program and defend empiricism in general and James’s brand of empiricism in particular (what he called radical empiricism) against these objections.

    Finally, I argue the need for a greatly expanded, enriched, and multidimensional version of a materialistic metaphysics and contend that such metaphysics can be fully integrated with James’s philosophy of radical empiricism. It can be so despite his fervent objections to the much narrower Newtonian conception of materialism he tended to take for granted and that was widely assumed in his time. This constricted, mechanical, one-eyed, and outmoded view of matter and its functions continues to contribute substantially toward making the inescapable fact of consciousness and its routinely experienced capabilities the intractable hard problem for a nondualistic philosophy of mind that it is generally considered to be in our own day." (pp.9-10)

    "Who and what am I as a conscious self ?

    • How do I relate to my body ?

    • How can I distinguish between what is in me and what is in the world ?

    • How do I and my body relate to the world, including the world of other selves ?

    • What is the relation of experience in its various guises to my conceptualizations, beliefs, purposes, and values ?

    • How is it possible for me to know anything, either about myself or the world, and how can I tell when I or others are thinking, or are on the path of thinking, reliably and veridically ?

    • What is matter, and what is the relation of matter and mind ?

    • Am I free, and if so, what is the extent of my freedom ?

    • What ought I to aspire to become as an individual self ?

    • What sort of world of the future should I envision, contribute to, and work toward, and why ?" (p.11)

    "I defend the thesis that James’s philosophy is perfectly compatible with a materialistic metaphysics, so long as we are willing to recognize matter to be everything it has shown itself over evolutionary time and in its manifold configurations to be capable of accomplishing or producing. In other words, matter is what matter does. And part of what it does, at least in some of its evolved and highly organized forms, is to be alive and aware, to feel and think, to intend and plan, to exert effort and experience resistance—in short, to function as life and mind. The discussions in this final chapter are placed in the context of some continuing quandaries in contemporary physics and of recent emergentist views of life and mind." (p.XII)

    "While I am sympathetic with the general outlook of James’s philosophy, as can readily be seen in the focus, tone, and content of this book, I seek to cast important new light on themes discussed and interrelated in the book.

    For example, I

    • contend for a purely epistemological (and not metaphysical) interpretation of James’s concept of pure experience ;

    • claim that pure experience is not some kind of single amorphous reservoir independent of individual persons ;

    • demonstrate that experience does not require a prior experiencer ;

    • exhibit that radical empiricism and pragmatism are in no way opposed but are aspects of a single, entirely consistent outlook ;

    • discuss, amplify, and exemplify James’s contention that emotions can be ways of knowing and not just of subjective, self-contained feeling ;

    • expose the fallaciousness of simple-minded and wildly misleading interpretations of James’s so-called will to believe ;

    • show why it would be impossible, on James’s ground, for two firsthand experiences to coalesce into one ;

    • respond to the charge that James is a closet Cartesian ;

    • defend the continuing viability of empiricism, and James’s brand of empiricism in particular, against contemporary critics of empiricism as an epistemological approach or program ;

    • provide support of my own for indeterminism and noncompatibilist freedom, complementing that of James’s ;

    • contend that consciousness and mind are not confined to the brain but are functions of the whole bodily organism in its relations to the external environment, including the social and cultural environment (in keeping with the insistence of writers such as W. Teed Rockwell, Alva Noë, Michael S. Gazzaniga, and Evan Thompson, whose works are discussed or cited) ;

    • insist that matter is what matter does and illustrate the wide variety of things it does ;

    • endeavor to show the compatibility of radical empiricism with what I call radical materialism and with new perspectives brought to bear on the concept of matter in such areas as contemporary physics, emergentist biology, and neurophysiology ;

    • make a case for a multidisciplinary approach to an adequate understanding of the potentialities, functions, and manifestations of matter, one that is especially cognizant of the contribution philosophy can make in this regard." (pp.XII-XIII)

    [Chapter one : The role of pure experience]

    " “Pure experience” is the name which I gave to the immediate flux of life which furnishes only the material to our later reflection, with its conceptual categories. —William James (1976: 46)

    We begin our investigations with the theme of this initial chapter, which is James’s conception of pure experience and the pivotal role it plays in his philosophy. His terse definition of pure experience is contained in the epigraph to the present chapter, but he hastens to add that its “purity,” in the contexts of normal, everyday, non-pure experience “is only a relative term, meaning the proportional amount of unverbalized sensation which it still embodies” (James 1976: 46). This statement about unverbalized or unconceptualized experience will be seen to have particular importance for our discussion of the viability of empiricism as an epistemological outlook and program in chapters 5 and 6, because were there no distinction between experience and its conceptualizations, experience as such would be left with no standing as a test of the adequacy of current conceptualizations or as a source of bold new insights and understandings. Experience and conceptualization would then be blended indissolubly together. Their complete, unqualified entanglement would allow no independent role for experience as over against conceptual theorizations or interpretations. The idea of at least relatively pure experience, on the other hand, allows us to envision the distinct possibility of a newly noted, freshly emphasized, or previously unconceptualized aspect of experience coming to stand in contrast with and in that way to challenge the appropriateness of one or more of the taken-for-granted, familiar, and hitherto unquestioned ways of understanding, organizing, and interpreting experience." (pp.1-2)

    "Philosopher of mind Evan Thompson helps us to comprehend James’s concept of pure experience when he talks of what he calls “prereflective bodily self-consciousness.” The “bodily” part of his terminology will have to await my later discussions of the relations of mind and body in James’s (and Thompson’s) thought. But the notion of “prereflective consciousness,” as Thompson also refers to it, is highly germane to James’s idea of pure experience and gives us a good sense of the latter’s importance for understanding our experiences of ourselves and the world. “The term prereflective is useful,” Thompson urges, “because it has both a logical and a temporal sense. Prereflective experience is logically prior to reflection, for reflection presupposes something to reflect upon; and it is temporally prior to reflection, for what one reflects upon is a hitherto unreflected experience” (2007: 249–50). Similarly for James, pure experience is the diffuse field of awareness from which focused items of attention and conceptualization are drawn and thus operates as the logically transcendent precondition, context, or background for the latter’s intelligibility and meaning. And pure experience is temporally prior to all selections and conceptualizations because their occurrence requires an already existent impetus and basis for what is sorted out and reflected upon.

    James adamantly insists that no set of conceptual categories, however ingenious or refined, is or can be adequate to capture the fullness of experience in all of its dimensions and depths. We always experience more than we can clearly state, analyze, or explain. The necessary excess of felt but unverbalized resonances of meaning in every particular experience points toward the all-encompassing, inexhaustible reality of pure experience. Within the field of pure experience there are, he tells us, teeming multitudes of thats which are not yet whats (James 1976: Cool. These are particular details, units, or aspects of experience that have not been sorted into conceptual categories and relations even though they may qualify for such sorting. Pure experience is a vast swarm of unnamed particulars in continual flux, a confusing mélange of connections and disconnections, similarities and differences, interfusions and separations. In his book A Pluralistic Universe, James contrasts the “thickness” of experienced reality with an implied thinness of any or all of the concepts we use at any time to explore and explicate its character and meanings (James 1996a: 250–51, 261). In his essay “The World of Pure Experience” he declares that “our fields of experience,” properly understood, “have no more definite boundaries than have our fields of view. Both are fringed for ever by a more that continuously develops, and that continuously supersedes them as life proceeds” (James 1976: 35). Bruce Wilshire nicely captures the plausibility of this notion when he states, “At every waking moment of our lives there is a margin of things known vaguely. James wants to grasp the environment in which we actually live—that which shades off on all sides into the dense, opaque, and vague; that which lies in the corner of the eye” (Wilshire 1968: 200).

    Pure experience is James’s term for what the world would be like for us humans or any other kinds of creature if we or they had no organs of perception or discrimination, no memories or expectations, no capacity for sorting or selecting, no conscious powers of acting or interacting, no sense of what is important or unimportant at given times or circumstances amid the teeming flow of things. In such an imagined world of inexhaustible, incomprehensible density and complexity, no creature could survive, find its way, or leave progeny in the world. We humans cannot live the whole or experience the whole ; we can only cope with parts of the whole. Our senses themselves are at bottom, James observes in The Principles of Psychology, “organs of selection,” and they enable us to ignore “as completely as if they did not exist” most of the welter of goings-on present to us at any moment (James 1950: I, 284). Those parts of potential experience we either instinctively or consciously select for focus and attention are surrounded by a penumbra of all that is not focused upon or attended to, a penumbra that shades off into the murkiness of a stupendously vast and ever-changing experiential world." (pp.2-3)
    -Donald A. Crosby, The Philosophy of William James. Radical Empiricism and Radical Materialism, Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, 2013, 166 pages.




    _________________
    « La question n’est pas de constater que les gens vivent plus ou moins pauvrement, mais toujours d’une manière qui leur échappe. » -Guy Debord, Critique de la séparation (1961).

    « Rien de grand ne s’est jamais accompli dans le monde sans passion. » -Hegel, La Raison dans l'Histoire.

    « Mais parfois le plus clair regard aime aussi l’ombre. » -Friedrich Hölderlin, "Pain et Vin".

    Johnathan R. Razorback
    Johnathan R. Razorback
    Admin


    Messages : 18919
    Date d'inscription : 12/08/2013
    Localisation : France

    Donald A. Crosby, The Philosophy of William James. Radical Empiricism and Radical Materialism	 Empty Re: Donald A. Crosby, The Philosophy of William James. Radical Empiricism and Radical Materialism

    Message par Johnathan R. Razorback Dim 18 Fév - 17:53

    .


    _________________
    « La question n’est pas de constater que les gens vivent plus ou moins pauvrement, mais toujours d’une manière qui leur échappe. » -Guy Debord, Critique de la séparation (1961).

    « Rien de grand ne s’est jamais accompli dans le monde sans passion. » -Hegel, La Raison dans l'Histoire.

    « Mais parfois le plus clair regard aime aussi l’ombre. » -Friedrich Hölderlin, "Pain et Vin".

    Johnathan R. Razorback
    Johnathan R. Razorback
    Admin


    Messages : 18919
    Date d'inscription : 12/08/2013
    Localisation : France

    Donald A. Crosby, The Philosophy of William James. Radical Empiricism and Radical Materialism	 Empty Re: Donald A. Crosby, The Philosophy of William James. Radical Empiricism and Radical Materialism

    Message par Johnathan R. Razorback Dim 18 Fév - 17:53

    b.


    _________________
    « La question n’est pas de constater que les gens vivent plus ou moins pauvrement, mais toujours d’une manière qui leur échappe. » -Guy Debord, Critique de la séparation (1961).

    « Rien de grand ne s’est jamais accompli dans le monde sans passion. » -Hegel, La Raison dans l'Histoire.

    « Mais parfois le plus clair regard aime aussi l’ombre. » -Friedrich Hölderlin, "Pain et Vin".

    Johnathan R. Razorback
    Johnathan R. Razorback
    Admin


    Messages : 18919
    Date d'inscription : 12/08/2013
    Localisation : France

    Donald A. Crosby, The Philosophy of William James. Radical Empiricism and Radical Materialism	 Empty Re: Donald A. Crosby, The Philosophy of William James. Radical Empiricism and Radical Materialism

    Message par Johnathan R. Razorback Dim 18 Fév - 17:58

    c.



    _________________
    « La question n’est pas de constater que les gens vivent plus ou moins pauvrement, mais toujours d’une manière qui leur échappe. » -Guy Debord, Critique de la séparation (1961).

    « Rien de grand ne s’est jamais accompli dans le monde sans passion. » -Hegel, La Raison dans l'Histoire.

    « Mais parfois le plus clair regard aime aussi l’ombre. » -Friedrich Hölderlin, "Pain et Vin".

    Johnathan R. Razorback
    Johnathan R. Razorback
    Admin


    Messages : 18919
    Date d'inscription : 12/08/2013
    Localisation : France

    Donald A. Crosby, The Philosophy of William James. Radical Empiricism and Radical Materialism	 Empty Re: Donald A. Crosby, The Philosophy of William James. Radical Empiricism and Radical Materialism

    Message par Johnathan R. Razorback Dim 18 Fév - 17:59



    "James était particulièrement soucieux de soumettre à un examen critique les hypothèses sur le moi et ses relations avec le monde qui nous égarent et nous empêchent d'orienter nos recherches vers le caractère concret, la profondeur et la plénitude de l'expérience dans toutes ses dimensions. Il était un adversaire implacable de la réduction des processus mentaux aux descriptions théoriques de la physique et du type de métaphysique matérialiste qui s'engage dans la fermeture causale de la physique et qui ne peut donc pas trouver de place pour des choix véritablement libres et guidés par la raison du moi humain parmi des alternatives pertinentes. Il était profondément ouvert et respectueux des théories et des découvertes des sciences naturelles telles que celles de la physique newtonienne, de la biologie darwinienne et des recherches neurophysiologiques de son époque, mais il a insisté tout au long de sa vie pour que ces développements et ces découvertes soient complétés par ce qu'il considérait comme des aperçus perspicaces et des perspectives critiques d'autres domaines importants de la pensée et de la conscience tels que les arts, la moralité, la religion et la philosophie. Par-dessus tout, il insistait pour que ceux qui s'engagent à réfléchir en profondeur sur le moi et ses relations avec le monde restent constamment en contact étroit avec les révélations, les pratiques et les exigences de la vie ordinaire et quotidienne. Il voulait développer une philosophie qui ne soit pas seulement soigneusement pensée et défendue de manière critique, mais qui puisse également être mise en pratique et vécue avec succès.

    Dans cet ouvrage, je me concentre principalement sur la philosophie de William James en ce qui concerne ses conceptions de l'expérience "pure" et ordinaire, les natures respectives du moi et du monde, et les interrelations entre l'expérience, le moi et le monde. Je fournis des explications et des interprétations critiques de ces thèmes dans la philosophie de James et, lorsque je le juge approprié, je fais des suggestions substantielles pour les clarifier et les améliorer. Je défends la thèse selon laquelle ces thèmes offrent une base prometteuse pour construire une philosophie crédible de l'esprit et de ses relations avec le monde. Ils constituent un excellent point de départ ou un tremplin pour une telle philosophie, bien qu'ils ne doivent pas et ne peuvent pas être considérés comme un lieu où s'arrêter ou rester. En cours de route, j'examine certaines objections récentes à l'empirisme en tant que programme épistémologique et je défends l'empirisme en général et la forme d'empirisme de James en particulier (ce qu'il a appelé l'empirisme radical) contre ces objections.

    Enfin, je soutiens la nécessité d'une version considérablement élargie, enrichie et multidimensionnelle d'une métaphysique matérialiste et j'affirme qu'une telle métaphysique peut être pleinement intégrée à la philosophie de l'empirisme radical de James. Il peut en être ainsi malgré ses objections ferventes à la conception newtonienne beaucoup plus étroite du matérialisme qu'il avait tendance à considérer comme acquise et qui était largement répandue à son époque. Cette vision étroite, mécanique, borgne et dépassée de la matière et de ses fonctions continue de contribuer substantiellement à faire du fait inéluctable de la conscience et de ses capacités couramment expérimentées le problème difficile et intraitable pour une philosophie non dualiste de l'esprit qu'il est généralement considéré comme tel à notre époque". (pp.9-10)

    "Qui et qu'est-ce que je suis en tant que moi conscient ?

    - Quelle est ma relation avec mon corps ?

    - Comment puis-je faire la distinction entre ce qui est en moi et ce qui est dans le monde ?

    - Comment moi et mon corps sommes nous en relation avec le monde, y compris le monde des autres moi ?

    - Quelle est la relation entre l'expérience, sous ses différentes formes, et mes conceptualisations, mes croyances, mes objectifs et mes valeurs ?

    - Comment est-il possible pour moi de savoir quoi que ce soit, que ce soit sur moi-même ou sur le monde, et comment puis-je dire quand moi ou d'autres pensons, ou sommes sur le chemin de la pensée, de manière fiable et vérifiée ?

    - Qu'est-ce que la matière, et quelle est la relation entre la matière et l'esprit ?

    - Suis-je libre, et si oui, quelle est l'étendue de ma liberté ?

    - Que dois-je aspirer à devenir en tant qu'individu ?

    - Quel genre de monde futur devrais-je envisager, auquel je devrais contribuer et pour lequel je devrais travailler, et pourquoi ?

    "Je défends la thèse selon laquelle la philosophie de James est parfaitement compatible avec une métaphysique matérialiste, pour autant que nous soyons prêts à reconnaître que la matière est tout ce qu'elle s'est montrée capable d'accomplir ou de produire au cours de l'évolution et dans ses multiples configurations. En d'autres termes, la matière est ce que la matière fait. Et une partie de ce qu'elle fait, au moins dans certaines de ses formes évoluées et hautement organisées, est d'être vivante et consciente, de sentir et de penser, d'avoir des intentions et de planifier, d'exercer des efforts et d'éprouver de la résistance - en bref, de fonctionner comme la vie et l'esprit. Les discussions de ce dernier chapitre sont placées dans le contexte de certains dilemmes persistants de la physique contemporaine et des récentes conceptions
    émergentistes de la vie et de l'esprit". (p.XII)

    "Bien que je sois en accord avec la perspective générale de la philosophie de James, comme on peut facilement le voir dans l'orientation, le ton et le contenu de ce livre, je cherche à jeter une lumière nouvelle et importante sur les thèmes discutés et liés dans le livre.

    Par exemple, je

    - je défends une interprétation
    purement épistémologique (et non métaphysique) du concept d'expérience pure de James ;

    - affirmer que l'expérience pure n'est pas une sorte de réservoir
    unique et amorphe indépendant des personnes individuelles ;

    - démontrer que l'expérience n'a pas besoin d'un expérimentateur préalable ;

    - démontrer que l'empirisme radical et le pragmatisme ne sont en aucun cas opposés, mais qu'ils sont des aspects d'une perspective unique et entièrement cohérente ;

    - discuter, amplifier et exemplifier l'affirmation de James selon laquelle les émotions peuvent être des moyens de connaissance et pas seulement des sentiments subjectifs et autonomes ;

    - exposer le caractère fallacieux des interprétations simples et extrêmement trompeuses de la soi-disant volonté de croire de James ;

    - montrer pourquoi il serait impossible, sur le terrain de James, que deux expériences de première main se fondent en une seule ;

    - répondre à l'accusation selon laquelle James est un cartésien convaincu ;

    - défendre la viabilité de l'empirisme, et de l'empirisme de James en particulier, contre les critiques contemporaines de l'empirisme en tant qu'approche ou programme épistémologique ;

    - apporter mon propre soutien à l'indéterminisme et à la liberté non compatissante, en complément de celui de James ;

    - soutenir que la conscience et l'esprit ne sont pas confinés au cerveau mais sont des fonctions de l'ensemble de l'organisme corporel dans ses relations avec l'environnement extérieur, y compris l'environnement social et culturel (conformément à l'insistance d'auteurs tels que W. Teed Rockwell, Alva Noë, Michael S. Gazzaniga et Evan Thompson, dont les œuvres sont discutées ou citées) ; - insister sur le fait que la matière est ce que la matière fait et qu'elle ne peut pas faire autrement que ce qu'elle fait ;

    - insister sur le fait que la matière est ce que la matière fait et illustrer la grande variété de choses qu'elle fait ;

    - s'efforcer de montrer la compatibilité de l'empirisme radical avec ce que j'appelle le matérialisme radical et avec les nouvelles perspectives apportées au concept de matière dans des domaines tels que la physique contemporaine, la biologie émergentiste et la neurophysiologie ;

    - plaider en faveur d'une approche multidisciplinaire pour une compréhension adéquate des potentialités, des fonctions et des manifestations de la matière, une approche qui soit particulièrement consciente de la contribution que la philosophie peut apporter à cet égard". (pp.XII-XIII)

    [Chapitre premier : Le rôle de l'expérience pure]

    "L'expérience pure est le nom que j'ai donné au flux immédiat de la vie qui ne fournit que le matériel à notre réflexion ultérieure, avec ses catégories conceptuelles. -William James (1976 : 46)

    Nous commençons nos recherches par le thème de ce premier chapitre, à savoir la conception qu'a James de l'expérience pure et le rôle central qu'elle joue dans sa philosophie. Sa définition laconique de l'expérience pure figure dans l'épigraphe du présent chapitre, mais il s'empresse d'ajouter que sa "pureté", dans le contexte de l'expérience normale, quotidienne et non pure, "n'est qu'un terme relatif, signifiant la quantité proportionnelle de sensation non verbalisée qu'elle incarne encore" (James 1976 : 46). Cette affirmation sur l'expérience non verbalisée ou non conceptualisée revêtira une importance particulière pour notre discussion sur la viabilité de l'empirisme en tant que perspective et programme épistémologique dans les chapitres 5 et 6, car s'il n'y avait pas de distinction entre l'expérience et ses conceptualisations, l'expérience en tant que telle n'aurait pas la possibilité de tester l'adéquation des conceptualisations actuelles ou d'être la source de nouvelles idées et de nouvelles compréhensions audacieuses. L'expérience et la conceptualisation seraient alors indissolublement mêlées. Leur enchevêtrement complet et sans réserve ne permettrait pas à l'expérience de jouer un rôle indépendant par rapport aux théories ou interprétations conceptuelles. L'idée d'une expérience au moins relativement pure, d'un autre côté, nous permet d'envisager la possibilité distincte d'un aspect de l'expérience nouvellement noté, fraîchement souligné, ou précédemment non conceptualisé, qui viendrait contraster et ainsi remettre en question la pertinence d'une ou de plusieurs façons prises pour acquises, familières et jusqu'ici non remises en question de comprendre, d'organiser et d'interpréter l'expérience". (pp.1-2)

    "Le philosophe de l'esprit Evan Thompson nous aide à comprendre le concept d'expérience pure de James lorsqu'il parle de ce qu'il appelle la "conscience corporelle pré-réflexive de soi". La partie "corporelle" de sa terminologie devra attendre mes discussions ultérieures sur les relations entre l'esprit et le corps dans la pensée de James (et de Thompson). Mais la notion de "conscience pré-réflexive", à laquelle Thompson se réfère également, est très liée à l'idée que James se fait de l'expérience pure et nous donne une bonne idée de l'importance de cette dernière pour la compréhension de nos expériences de nous-mêmes et du monde. "Le terme "pré-réflexif" est utile, insiste Thompson, car il a un sens à la fois logique et temporel. L'expérience pré-réflexive est logiquement antérieure à la réflexion, car la réflexion présuppose quelque chose sur lequel réfléchir ; et elle est temporellement antérieure à la réflexion, car ce sur quoi on réfléchit est une expérience jusqu'alors non réfléchie" (2007 : 249-50). De même, pour James, l'expérience pure est le champ diffus de la conscience à partir duquel les éléments d'attention et de conceptualisation sont tirés et fonctionne donc comme la condition préalable, le contexte ou l'arrière-plan logiquement transcendant pour l'intelligibilité et la signification de ces derniers. L'expérience pure est temporellement antérieure à toutes les sélections et à toutes les conceptualisations, car leur apparition nécessite une impulsion et une base déjà existantes pour ce qui est trié et réfléchi.

    James insiste catégoriquement sur le fait qu'aucun ensemble de catégories conceptuelles, aussi ingénieuses ou raffinées soient-elles, n'est ou ne peut être adéquat pour capturer la plénitude de l'expérience dans toutes ses dimensions et profondeurs. Nous vivons toujours plus que ce que nous pouvons clairement énoncer, analyser ou expliquer. L'excès nécessaire de résonances de sens ressenties mais non verbalisées dans chaque expérience particulière renvoie à la réalité englobante et inépuisable de l'expérience pure. Dans le champ de l'expérience pure, il y a, nous dit-il, des multitudes grouillantes de ce qui n'est pas encore blanc (James 1976 : ). Il s'agit de détails, d'unités ou d'aspects particuliers de l'expérience qui n'ont pas été classés dans des catégories et des relations conceptuelles, même s'ils peuvent se prêter à un tel classement. L'expérience pure est un vaste essaim de particularités sans nom en flux continu, un mélange déroutant de connexions et de déconnexions, de similitudes et de différences, d'interférences et de séparations. Dans son livre A Pluralistic Universe, James oppose l'"épaisseur" de la réalité expérimentée à la minceur implicite de tout ou partie des concepts que nous utilisons à tout moment pour explorer et expliciter son caractère et ses significations (James 1996a : 250-51, 261). Dans son essai "Le monde de l'expérience pure", il déclare que "nos champs d'expérience", bien compris, "n'ont pas de frontières plus définies que nos champs de vision. Tous deux sont bordés à jamais par un plus qui se développe continuellement et qui les remplace continuellement au fur et à mesure que la vie avance" (James 1976 : 35). Bruce Wilshire rend bien compte de la plausibilité de cette notion lorsqu'il déclare : "À chaque instant de notre vie, il y a une marge de choses connues vaguement". James veut saisir l'environnement dans lequel nous vivons réellement - celui qui s'estompe de tous côtés dans le dense, l'opaque et le vague ; celui qui se trouve au coin de l'œil" (Wilshire 1968 : 200).

    L'expérience pure est le terme utilisé par James pour décrire ce que serait le monde pour nous, les humains, ou tout autre type de créature, si nous ou eux n'avions pas d'organes de perception ou de discrimination, pas de souvenirs ou d'attentes, pas de capacité de tri ou de sélection, pas de pouvoir conscient d'agir ou d'interagir, pas de sens de ce qui est important ou non à un moment donné ou dans des circonstances données au milieu du flux grouillant des choses. Dans un tel monde imaginé, d'une densité et d'une complexité inépuisables et incompréhensibles, aucune créature ne pourrait survivre, trouver son chemin ou laisser une descendance dans le monde. Nous, les humains, ne pouvons pas vivre le tout ou faire l'expérience du tout ; nous ne pouvons faire face qu'à des parties du tout. Nos sens eux-mêmes sont au fond, observe James dans The Principles of Psychology, des "organes de sélection", et ils nous permettent d'ignorer "aussi complètement que s'ils n'existaient pas" la plupart des événements qui se présentent à nous à chaque instant (James 1950 : I, 284). Les parties de l'expérience potentielle que nous sélectionnons instinctivement ou consciemment pour la focalisation et l'attention sont entourées d'une pénombre de tout ce qui n'est pas focalisé ou pris en compte, une pénombre qui s'estompe dans le brouillard d'un monde expérientiel stupéfiant, vaste et en constante évolution. (pp.2-3)
    -Donald A. Crosby, The Philosophy of William James. Radical Empiricism and Radical Materialism, Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, 2013, 166 pages.

    -Donald A. Crosby, The Philosophy of William James. Radical Empiricism and Radical Materialism, Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, 2013, 166 pages.



    _________________
    « La question n’est pas de constater que les gens vivent plus ou moins pauvrement, mais toujours d’une manière qui leur échappe. » -Guy Debord, Critique de la séparation (1961).

    « Rien de grand ne s’est jamais accompli dans le monde sans passion. » -Hegel, La Raison dans l'Histoire.

    « Mais parfois le plus clair regard aime aussi l’ombre. » -Friedrich Hölderlin, "Pain et Vin".


    Contenu sponsorisé


    Donald A. Crosby, The Philosophy of William James. Radical Empiricism and Radical Materialism	 Empty Re: Donald A. Crosby, The Philosophy of William James. Radical Empiricism and Radical Materialism

    Message par Contenu sponsorisé


      La date/heure actuelle est Jeu 29 Fév - 15:59