L'Académie nouvelle

Vous souhaitez réagir à ce message ? Créez un compte en quelques clics ou connectez-vous pour continuer.
L'Académie nouvelle

Forum d'archivage politique et scientifique

Le Deal du moment :
Cartes Pokémon – coffret ETB Astres ...
Voir le deal

    Murray N. Rothbard, Law, Property Rights, and Air Pollution + Robert P. Murphy, Air Pollution Regulation Isn’t the Answer

    Johnathan R. Razorback
    Johnathan R. Razorback
    Admin


    Messages : 10763
    Date d'inscription : 12/08/2013
    Localisation : France

    Murray N. Rothbard, Law, Property Rights, and Air Pollution + Robert P. Murphy, Air Pollution Regulation Isn’t the Answer Empty Murray N. Rothbard, Law, Property Rights, and Air Pollution + Robert P. Murphy, Air Pollution Regulation Isn’t the Answer

    Message par Johnathan R. Razorback Jeu 26 Mar - 18:51

    https://mises.org/library/law-property-rights-and-air-pollution

    "1. The Role of the Free Market
    Objections: The free market works well for providing bicycles and computers, but we need strong government regulation to protect air quality, which lies outside the market.
    Answer: The case for free markets rests on respect for property rights. If a factory is allowed to pump soot into the air and this harms people, the fundamental problem is a lack of relevant property rights. Nobody “owns” the atmosphere and it becomes a “tragedy of the commons.” (The overgrazing of cattle plagued the “common” pastureland in England before property rights were defined and enforced in a more sensible manner.) So rather than viewing air pollution as a “market failure,” we can see it is really just a matter of ill-defined property rights.
    2. The Problem of Pollution
    Objections: Sure, you can make excuses and say it’s not the market’s fault, but as things stand in reality, we need governments to ensure businesses don’t pollute.
    Answer: Far from being the benefactor of environmental quality, historically legislatures and courts in countries such as England and the United States overturned the traditional legal rights of individuals in order to promote industrial development. And the worst environmental abuses occurred under communist regimes, including the 1986 Chernobyl disaster, which is still considered the worst nuclear power plant accident in history. As economist Richard Stroup observes:
    The failures of centralized government control in Eastern Europe and the Soviet Union awakened further interest in free-market environmentalism in the early 1990s. As glasnost lifted the veil of secrecy, press reports identified large areas where brown haze hung in the air, people’s eyes routinely burned from chemical fumes, and drivers had to use headlights in the middle of the day. In 1990 the Wall Street Journal quoted a claim by Hungarian doctors that 10 percent of the deaths in Hungary might be directly related to pollution. The New York Times reported that parts of the town of Merseburg, East Germany, were “permanently covered by a white chemical dust, and a sour smell fills people’s nostrils.”
    3. Regulations and Air Quality Correlation
    Objections: Fair enough, sometimes governments get it wrong too. But with a relatively democratic and transparent system of government such as in the United States, history clearly shows that increased regulation goes hand-in-hand with cleaner air.
    Answer: The economic principles of scarcity and tradeoffs apply to environmental quality just as much as conventional goods and services. As a society becomes richer, its people can afford a higher standard of living. That means bigger houses, nicer cars, longer life spans, and cleaner air.
    It may be true that the current legal system (which is controlled by the government, let us not forget) doesn’t delineate private property rights in the atmosphere, and in that respect it would be difficult for regular market forces to directly provide “cleaner air” to consumers, the way the market can provide “faster cars” and “bigger houses” if that’s what people want to buy.
    Nonetheless, we must realize that cleaner air comes at a price. If we were to impose today’s EPA air quality regulations on London in 1890, or on Beijing today, it would improve the air quality, but at a high cost in other potential goods. It is possible that the people affected by such a move—namely, the people living in London in 1890 or in Beijing today—would resent being forced to effectively spend so much more of their income on “cleaner air” and less of their income on things like “energy and transportation.”
    The historical improvements in air quality in the United States, for example, didn’t occur merely because of government regulations. At best, government regulations could channel some of the increasing standard of living (made possible by the market economy) into the specific outlet of “better air quality.”
    Yet even here, we must be careful not to credit government regulations for improvements that were “naturally” occurring anyway. For example, AEI scholars Joel Schwartz and Steven Hayward show that air quality was improving for decades in the United States well before the 1970 Clean Air Act was passed at the federal level:

    Why was air quality improving even before the federal government began mandating it? Some of the improvements could be attributed to state and possibly local regulations, but regular economic growth also provided cleaner air as an unintentional byproduct.
    For example, Schwartz and Hayward report that “growing affluence allowed households to switch from coal to cleaner, more efficient natural gas for home heating and cooking.” Furthermore, improvements in electrical transmission allowed power plants to be located near coal mines, and away from population centers.
    And even though the invention of the automobile would eventually lead to smog in major cities, it actually solved the “horse manure crisis” of the late 1800s. In similar fashion, even absent explicit government intervention, presumably electric vehicles will gain a growing market share over time, naturally solving some of today’s problems in urban air quality."
    -Robert P. Murphy, "Air Pollution Regulation Isn’t the Answer", 22 mai 2018: https://fee.org/articles/air-pollution-regulation-isn-t-the-answer/




    _________________
    « La question n’est pas de constater que les gens vivent plus ou moins pauvrement, mais toujours d’une manière qui leur échappe. » -Guy Debord, Critique de la séparation (1961).

    « Rien de grand ne s’est jamais accompli dans le monde sans passion. » -Hegel, La Raison dans l'Histoire.

    « Mais parfois le plus clair regard aime aussi l’ombre. » -Friedrich Hölderlin, "Pain et Vin".

    Johnathan R. Razorback
    Johnathan R. Razorback
    Admin


    Messages : 10763
    Date d'inscription : 12/08/2013
    Localisation : France

    Murray N. Rothbard, Law, Property Rights, and Air Pollution + Robert P. Murphy, Air Pollution Regulation Isn’t the Answer Empty Re: Murray N. Rothbard, Law, Property Rights, and Air Pollution + Robert P. Murphy, Air Pollution Regulation Isn’t the Answer

    Message par Johnathan R. Razorback Jeu 26 Mar - 20:54

    "1. Le rôle du marché libre
    Objections : Le marché libre fonctionne bien pour la fourniture de bicyclettes et d'ordinateurs, mais nous avons besoin d'une réglementation gouvernementale forte pour protéger la qualité de l'air, qui se situe en dehors du domaine du marché.

    Réponse : Les arguments en faveur du libre marché reposent sur le respect des droits de propriété. Si une usine est autorisée à rejeter de la suie dans l'air et que cela nuit aux gens, le problème fondamental est l'absence de droits de propriété pertinents. Personne ne "possède" l'atmosphère et cela devient en conséquence une "tragédie des biens communs". (Le surpâturage du bétail a touché les pâturages "communs" en Angleterre avant que les droits de propriété ne soient définis et appliqués de manière plus raisonnable). Ainsi, plutôt que de considérer la pollution atmosphérique comme un "échec du marché", nous pouvons constater qu'il s'agit en réalité d'une question de droits de propriété mal définis.

    2. Le problème de la pollution
    Objections : Bien sûr, vous pouvez trouver des excuses et dire que ce n'est pas la faute du marché, mais dans la réalité, nous avons besoin que les gouvernements s'assurent que les entreprises ne polluent pas.

    Réponse : Loin d'être le bienfaiteur de l'l'environnement, historiquement, les législateurs et les tribunaux de pays tels que l'Angleterre et les États-Unis ont contourné les droits légaux traditionnels des individus afin de promouvoir le développement industriel. Et les pires abus environnementaux se sont produits sous les régimes communistes, notamment la catastrophe de Tchernobyl en 1986, qui est toujours considérée comme le pire accident de centrale nucléaire de l'histoire. Comme le fait remarquer l'économiste Richard Stroup :

    Les échecs du contrôle gouvernemental centralisé en Europe de l'Est et en Union soviétique ont réveillé l'intérêt pour l'environnementalisme de libre marché au début des années 1990. Lorsque la glasnost [politique de transparence] a levé le voile du secret, les articles de presse ont identifié de vastes zones où une brume brune pendait dans l'air, les yeux des gens brûlaient régulièrement à cause des vapeurs chimiques et les conducteurs devaient utiliser leurs phares en milieu de journée. En 1990, le Wall Street Journal a cité une déclaration de médecins hongrois selon laquelle 10 % des décès en Hongrie pourraient être directement liés à la pollution. Le New York Times a rapporté que certaines parties de la ville de Merseburg, en Allemagne de l'Est, étaient "recouvertes en permanence par une poussière chimique blanche, et qu'une odeur aigre emplissait les narines des gens".

    3. Réglementation et corrélation avec la qualité de l'air.
    Objections : Il est vrai que parfois les gouvernements se trompent aussi. Mais avec un système de gouvernement relativement démocratique et transparent comme aux États-Unis, l'histoire montre clairement qu'une réglementation accrue va de pair avec un air plus pur.

    Réponse : Les principes économiques de rareté et de compromis s'appliquent à la qualité de l'environnement tout autant qu'aux biens et services conventionnels. Lorsqu'une société devient plus riche, ses habitants peuvent se permettre un niveau de vie plus élevé. Cela signifie des maisons plus grandes, des voitures plus belles, une durée de vie plus longue et un air plus pur.

    Il est peut-être vrai que le système juridique actuel (qui est contrôlé par le gouvernement, ne l'oublions pas) ne délimite pas les droits de propriété privée dans l'atmosphère, et à cet égard, il serait difficile pour les forces régulières du marché de fournir directement un "air plus pur" aux consommateurs, comme le marché peut fournir des "voitures plus rapides" et des "maisons plus grandes" si c'est ce que les gens veulent acheter.

    Néanmoins, nous devons réaliser que l'air plus pur a un prix. Si nous devions imposer les réglementations actuelles de l'EPA sur la qualité de l'air à Londres en 1890, ou à Pékin aujourd'hui, cela améliorerait la qualité de l'air, mais à un coût élevé pour d'autres biens potentiels. Il est possible que les personnes touchées par une telle mesure, à savoir les habitants de Londres en 1890 ou de Pékin aujourd'hui, n'apprécient pas d'être obligées de consacrer une part beaucoup plus importante de leurs revenus à l'"assainissement de l'air" et une part moins importante à des choses comme "l'énergie et les transports".

    Les améliorations historiques de la qualité de l'air aux États-Unis, par exemple, ne se sont pas produites simplement à cause des réglementations gouvernementales. Au mieux, les réglementations gouvernementales pouvaient canaliser une partie de l'augmentation du niveau de vie (rendue possible par l'économie de marché) vers le débouché spécifique d'une "meilleure qualité de l'air".

    Pourtant, même ici, nous devons veiller à ne pas mettre au crédit de réglementations gouvernementales des améliorations qui se produisaient "naturellement" de toute façon. Par exemple, les universitaires de l'AEI Joel Schwartz et Steven Hayward montrent que la qualité de l'air s'est améliorée pendant des décennies aux États-Unis, bien avant l'adoption de la loi de 1970 sur la pureté de l'air au niveau fédéral.

    Pourquoi la qualité de l'air s'est-elle améliorée avant même que le gouvernement fédéral ne commence faire passer des lois ? Certaines de ces améliorations peuvent être attribuées à la réglementation des États et éventuellement des collectivités locales, mais la croissance économique régulière a également permis d'assainir l'air sans que cet objectif sans visé intentionnellement.

    Par exemple, Schwartz et Hayward rapportent que " la richesse croissante a permis aux ménages de passer du charbon au gaz naturel, plus propre et plus efficace, pour le chauffage et la cuisine ". En outre, l'amélioration de la transmission électrique a permis d'installer les centrales électriques à proximité des mines de charbon et loin des centres de population.

    Et même si l'invention de l'automobile a fini par entraîner la formation de smog dans les grandes villes, elle a en fait résolu la "crise du fumier de cheval" de la fin du 19ème siècle. De la même manière, même en l'absence d'une intervention explicite du gouvernement, on peut supposer que les véhicules électriques gagneront une part de marché croissante au fil du temps, ce qui résoudra naturellement certains des problèmes actuels de qualité de l'air urbain.
    "
    -Robert P. Murphy, "Air Pollution Regulation Isn’t the Answer", 22 mai 2018: https://fee.org/articles/air-pollution-regulation-isn-t-the-answer/




    _________________
    « La question n’est pas de constater que les gens vivent plus ou moins pauvrement, mais toujours d’une manière qui leur échappe. » -Guy Debord, Critique de la séparation (1961).

    « Rien de grand ne s’est jamais accompli dans le monde sans passion. » -Hegel, La Raison dans l'Histoire.

    « Mais parfois le plus clair regard aime aussi l’ombre. » -Friedrich Hölderlin, "Pain et Vin".


      La date/heure actuelle est Jeu 26 Mai - 7:04