L'Académie nouvelle

Vous souhaitez réagir à ce message ? Créez un compte en quelques clics ou connectez-vous pour continuer.
L'Académie nouvelle

Forum d'archivage politique et scientifique

Le deal à ne pas rater :
Fnac : 15% de réduction sur toutes les TV de 55″ est plus
Voir le deal

    Byron Clark, A Marxist critique of Postmodernism

    Johnathan R. Razorback
    Johnathan R. Razorback
    Admin


    Messages : 9917
    Date d'inscription : 12/08/2013
    Localisation : France

    Byron Clark, A Marxist critique of Postmodernism Empty Byron Clark, A Marxist critique of Postmodernism

    Message par Johnathan R. Razorback Mar 13 Juil - 21:09

    This article was originally published in the University of Canterbury student magazine Canta under the title ‘Minimum wage is an objective truth: How postmodernism hurts the working class’.

    "If you’re an Arts student then theres no doubt that you will have encountered the term ‘postmodernism’ at some point during your time at university, perhaps though you haven’t been given an explanation of this school of thought or perhaps more likely you’ve had it explained to you by ten different people- probably in twelve different ways. Its this confusion on what postmodernism actually is that makes any attempt at critiquing it so difficult. In the intellectual discussions that can be found outside campus cafés one arguing against postmodernism will soon hear from their opponent “no thats not what postmodernism is!” at which point the discussion becomes a frustrating argument about semantics usually ending with someone dismissively scoffing “bloody undergrads” and walking away. No doubt this article will draw similar responses, however I’m going to attempt to define postmodernism as accurately as I can, based on the impressions of it I have gained in the course of my university education, as well as though my own study, and then outline my criticism of it. Let me first state that if you’re inclined to use the word ‘postmodern’ to describe architecture (indeed this was the original use of the word), a piece of art, music or your latest haircut, then my argument is not with you. Refer to contemporary art however you like, and it doesn’t worry me, my argument here is against the philosophy of postmodernism, a collection of ideas that I see as having negative consequences in our society.

    Pomo; what the hell is it ?
    This is not an easy question to answer, a quick look at the Wikipedia article on postmodernism will show a graphic stating that the article is in need of an expert to come clean it up, and the article itself is of little help. Its not unreasonable that no one in Wikipedia’s volunteer community is a postmodernism expert, arguably there are few pomo ‘experts’ in existence. Even the well known linguist Noam Chomsky, a man who the New York Times has referred to as “One of the greatest intellectuals of our time” seems to have trouble getting his head around it; “There are lots of things I don’t understand — say, the latest debates over whether neutrinos have mass or the way that Fermat’s last theorem was (apparently) proven recently. But from 50 years in this game, I have learned two things: (1) I can ask friends who work in these areas to explain it to me at a level that I can understand, and they can do so, without particular difficulty; (2) if I’m interested, I can proceed to learn more so that I will come to understand it. Now [postmodernist theorists] Derrida, Lacan, Lyotard, Kristeva, etc. — even Foucault…write things that I also don’t understand but (1) and (2) don’t hold: no one who says they do understand can explain it to me and I haven’t a clue as to how to proceed to overcome my failures” (Chomsky, ca.1995). Baring this in mind, I ask you to accept this somewhat simplified deffinition that I will use for the sake of this argument.

    Postmodernism is the idea that there is no objective truth, because the way we perceive the world is constructed by our society, and in particular by language, and if this is the case, can we really know what reality is? If all truth is subjective, then what is true really? Some postmodernists draw from this the conclusion that what we perceive is real, or at least real to the individual, leading to a sort of philosophical idealism where, for example, a postmodernist on a walk through the park would say “I perceive that that tree over there exists, ergo, it does.” Not everyone who subscribes to the Pomo school of thought would take it this far, but some do (this will be discussed bellow in the section about Alan Sokal). First though, I will argue my philosophical objection.

    The materialist criticism
    The Marxist literary critic Fredric Jameson has argued, along with others, that our perception of reality is a reflection of the existing material world, he did this in a complex and pleonastic way in his book Postmodernism, or, the cultural logic of late capitalism. To save you reading about philosophical materialism, I’ll sum it up with an analogy; Jameson, on a walk though the park with our postmodernist friend would say “that tree exists, so you perceive it as existing.” For Jameson, the areas most analysed by postmodernist theorists, namely culture and society (lets call this the ‘superstructure’) can not be fully understood when separated from the material economic base of that society (lets call this ‘base’) although there is certainly a fair deal of social construction going on within the superstructure, any society is shaped by the relations of production and exchange (economics) that form its base. This is an argument that any clued up Marxist (such as this author) would subscribe to.

    Now, there is a chunk of ideas which are tied in with postmodernism that I would agree with. Is our perception of the world shaped by language? Most definitely, for an example take the use of the word “class” in New Zealand’s political discourse, its seldom mentioned at all, and when it is its usually preceded by the word “middle.” As such, when The Listener did a feature article on ‘class’ in New Zealand its research showed that most New Zealanders (83%) see themselves as “middle class” (Black, 2005) Would the postmodernists argue that this idea of a New Zealand with a tiny working class and tiny ruling class and a massive bulge in the middle is simply a perception, a subjective truth at best? Well they probably would, yet would they point out that ‘class’ in its true meaning, is the distinction between those who own the means of production, distribution and exchange (the ruling class) and those who work for them (the working class) and would they point out that a particular class has an interest in people perceiving our society the way most of those questioned by The Listener did? (we’re all just one big middle class!) sadly the answer is no. For the postmodernists, the very idea of social class is merely one of the many truths that are not true- after all, everything is subjective right? This same idea in common in postmodernist thought the world over, so we get for example, British historian David Cannadine claiming that In the eighteenth century “there was no ‘class’” in part because “Karl Marx was not alive and around to tell them this was who they were and what they were doing” (Cannadine, 1998, p.24).

    Consequences of the denial of class
    It is here that Jamesons work becomes more than just a book to read so you can say things like “look, just don’t even talk to me about postmoderism until you’ve read Jameson” next time you’re hanging with the cafe intellectuals, because he highlights the political ramifications of this way of thinking; “These are not merely theoretical issues; they have urgent practical political consequences, as is evident from the conventional feelings of First World subjects that existentially (or “empirically”) they really do inhabit a “postindustrial society” from which traditional production has disappeared and in which social classes of the classical type no longer exist – a conviction which has immediate effects on political praxis” (Jameson, 1991, p.53)

    The term ‘postindustrial society’ seems to be one enjoyed by the postmodernists, (industry is so, urgh, modern) but it is a misnomer, the world today is more industrialised than ever before, thanks the rapid growth and proliferation of third world sweatshops during the past three decades or so. To take the the view that our society (speaking globally) is “postindustrial” is incredibly Western-centric. Even in Western societies the service economy does not make class irrelevant, the fast food worker is still working to create wealth for the owners of the restaurant chains, and could not survive without selling his or her ability to work. Not to mention that as the fast food industry was built on Taylorist ideas of production line efficiency even the idea of ‘industry’ in the West is not irrelevant either (see for example, Schlosser, 2001).
    Postmodernism doesn’t mean that social class doesn’t exist, it just means we all pretend it doesn’t. Further, the very ideology of postmodernism makes a fight back against capitalisms increasing dominance of our lives stunted. In an example of what I mean by this, prominent anti-capitalist journalist Naomi Klein, writing of the influence of corporate marketing in universities stated that most academics were “preoccupied with their own postmodernist realization that truth itself is a construct. This realization made it intellectually untenable for for many academics to even participate in a political argument that would have “privileged” any one model of learning (public) over another (corporate)” (Klein, 2000, p.116).

    The Sokal hoax
    Postmodernism’s critics also come from the sciences; in 1996 physicist Alan Sokal was “troubled by an apparent decline in the standards of intellectual rigor in certain precincts of the American academic humanities” and decided to try an experiment: Would a leading North American journal of cultural studies (whose editorial collective ironically included Fredric Jameson) publish an article “liberally salted with nonsense?” To his surprise the answer was yes. His article “Transgressing the Boundaries: Toward a Transformative Hermeneutics of Quantum Gravity” declared “without the slightest evidence or argument, that “physical `reality’ [note the scare quotes] … is at bottom a social and linguistic construct’” (Sokal, 1996). Writing of his hoax he asked rhetorically “Is it now dogma in Cultural Studies that there exists no external world?” and invited “anyone who believes that the laws of physics are mere social conventions…to try transgressing those conventions from the windows of my apartment.” (ibid) Why did Sokal attempt to publish his nonsense article? Well, his criticisms of postmodernism are similar to the ones I’ve already outlined and are worth quoting at length; “my concern over the spread of subjectivist thinking is both intellectual and political. Intellectually, the problem with such doctrines is that they are false (when not simply meaningless). There is a real world; its properties are not merely social constructions; facts and evidence do matter. What sane person would contend otherwise? And yet, much contemporary academic theorizing consists precisely of attempts to blur these obvious truths — the utter absurdity of it all being concealed through obscure and pretentious language.” (ibid)

    While there are many brilliant academics in the world who are using their skills to benefit society, the dominance of the intellectual elitism (and sheer nonsense) that Chomsky, Klein and Sokal have mentioned is of grave concern. Chomksy wrote is his critique of postmodernism “The left intellectuals who 60 years ago would have been teaching in working class schools, writing books like “mathematics for the millions” (which made mathematics intelligible to millions of people), participating in and speaking for popular organizations, etc., are now largely disengaged from such activities, [they] are not to be found, it seems, when there is such an obvious and growing need and even explicit request for the work they could do out there in the world of people with live problems and concerns” (Chomsky, ca.1995).

    I worry for my generation, those of us who are students in New Zealand universities today are going to go on to become the next generation of intellectuals, yet we are a generation that grew up in the post-Rogernomics years, taught to look out for our individual interests, to think of ourselves as consumers rather than workers, and promised jobs in the wonderful postindustrial ‘knowledge economy.’ Postmodernism teaches us to ignore the reality we live in, and, by masking itself in obscure and pretentious language, creates a wedge between intellectuals and the worlds masses of working people. Its a way of thinking that almost seems made to fit the political situation of our time. When looking at how we are taught to think in our modern (or is that postmodern?) late capitalist society, its important we consider just who’s interests our way of thinking serves."
    -Byron Clark, "A Marxist critique of Postmodernism", 25 août 2008: https://fightback.org.nz/2008/08/25/a-marxist-critique-of-postmodernism/



    _________________
    « La question n’est pas de constater que les gens vivent plus ou moins pauvrement, mais toujours d’une manière qui leur échappe. »
    -Guy Debord, Critique de la séparation (1961).

    « Rien de grand ne s’est jamais accompli dans le monde sans passion. »
    -Hegel, La Raison dans l'Histoire.

    Johnathan R. Razorback
    Johnathan R. Razorback
    Admin


    Messages : 9917
    Date d'inscription : 12/08/2013
    Localisation : France

    Byron Clark, A Marxist critique of Postmodernism Empty Re: Byron Clark, A Marxist critique of Postmodernism

    Message par Johnathan R. Razorback Mer 14 Juil - 9:32

    "Si vous êtes un étudiant dans le domaine des humanités, il ne fait aucun doute que vous aurez rencontré le terme " postmodernisme " à un moment ou à un autre de vos études universitaires, même si on ne vous a pas expliqué cette école de pensée ou, plus probablement, si dix personnes différentes vous l'ont expliqué, probablement de douze façons différentes. C'est cette confusion sur ce qu'est réellement le postmodernisme qui rend si difficile toute tentative de le critiquer. Dans les discussions intellectuelles que l'on peut trouver à la sortie des cafés des campus, celui qui s'oppose au postmodernisme entendra bientôt son adversaire dire "non, ce n'est pas ça le postmodernisme !", et la discussion se transformera en un débat frustrant sur la sémantique, qui se terminera généralement par une remarque dédaigneuse du type "foutus étudiants de premier cycle" et par un départ. Il ne fait aucun doute que cet article suscitera des réactions similaires, mais je vais tenter de définir le postmodernisme aussi précisément que possible, en me fondant sur les impressions que j'en ai retirées au cours de ma formation universitaire, ainsi que par le biais de mes propres études, puis j'exposerai mes critiques à son égard.

    Permettez-moi tout d'abord de dire que si vous êtes enclin à utiliser le mot "postmoderne" pour décrire l'architecture (c'était d'ailleurs l'usage original du mot), une œuvre d'art, la musique ou votre dernière coupe de cheveux, alors je ne vous contredirai pas. Faites référence à l'art contemporain comme vous le souhaitez ; cela ne me dérange pas, mon argument ici est contre la philosophie postmoderniste, un ensemble d'idées que je considère comme ayant des conséquences négatives dans notre société.

    Le postmodernisme: mais par l'enfer qu'est-ce que c'est ??

    Ce n'est pas une question facile à résoudre, un rapide coup d'œil à l'article de Wikipédia sur le postmodernisme montrera un graphique indiquant que l'article a besoin d'un expert pour venir le nettoyer, et l'article lui-même n'est pas d'une grande aide. Il n'est pas déraisonnable que personne dans la communauté des bénévoles de Wikipédia ne soit un expert en postmodernisme, on peut même dire qu'il existe peu d'"experts" en la matière. Même le célèbre linguiste Noam Chomsky, un homme que le New York Times a qualifié de "l'un des plus grands intellectuels de notre temps", semble avoir du mal à s'y retrouver : "Il y a beaucoup de choses que je ne comprends pas - par exemple, les derniers débats sur la question de savoir si les neutrinos ont une masse ou la façon dont le dernier théorème de Fermat a été (apparemment) prouvé récemment. Mais après 50 ans dans ce jeu, j'ai appris deux choses : (1) je peux demander à des amis qui travaillent dans ces domaines de m'expliquer à un niveau que je peux comprendre, et ils peuvent le faire, sans difficulté particulière ; (2) si cela m'intéresse, je peux continuer à en apprendre davantage pour finir par comprendre. Or [les théoriciens postmodernistes] Derrida, Lacan, Lyotard, Kristeva, etc. - même Foucault... écrivent des choses que je ne comprends pas non plus, mais (1) et (2) ne fonctionnent pas : personne qui dit comprendre ne peut me l'expliquer et je n'ai pas la moindre idée de la façon de procéder pour surmonter mes difficultés." (Chomsky, vers 1995). En gardant cela à l'esprit, je vous demande d'accepter cette définition quelque peu simplifiée que j'utiliserai dans le cadre de cet exposé.

    Le postmodernisme est l'idée qu'il n'y a pas de vérité objective, parce que la façon dont nous percevons le monde est construite par notre société, et en particulier par le langage, et si c'est le cas, pouvons-nous vraiment savoir ce qu'est la réalité ? Si toute vérité est subjective, alors qu'est-ce qui est vraiment vrai ? Certains postmodernes en tirent la conclusion que ce que nous percevons est réel, ou du moins réel pour l'individu, ce qui conduit à une sorte d'idéalisme philosophique où, par exemple, un postmoderne, lors d'une promenade dans le parc, dirait : "Je perçois que cet arbre là-bas existe, par conséquent, il existe." Tous ceux qui souscrivent à l'école de pensée postmoderniste ne vont pas aussi loin, mais certains le font (nous en parlerons plus loin dans la section consacrée à Alan Sokal). Mais d'abord, je vais présenter mon objection philosophique.

    La critique matérialiste.

    Le critique littéraire marxiste Fredric Jameson a soutenu, avec d'autres, que notre perception de la réalité est un reflet du monde matériel existant, il l'a fait de manière complexe et pléonastique dans son livre Le Postmodernisme ou la logique culturelle du capitalisme tardif. Pour vous épargner la lecture du matérialisme philosophique, je vais le résumer par une analogie : Jameson, lors d'une promenade dans le parc avec notre ami postmoderniste, dirait "cet arbre existe, donc vous le percevez comme existant". Pour Jameson, les domaines les plus analysés par les théoriciens postmodernes, à savoir la culture et la société (appelons cela la "superstructure") ne peuvent être entièrement compris s'ils sont séparés de la base économique matérielle de cette société (appelons cela l' "infrastructure" "). Bien qu'il y ait certainement une bonne part de construction sociale au sein de la superstructure, toute société est façonnée par les relations de production et d'échange (économie) qui forment sa base. C'est un argument auquel tout marxiste averti (tel que Jameson) souscrirait.

    Maintenant, il y a une partie des idées liées au postmodernisme avec lesquelles je suis d'accord. Notre perception du monde est-elle façonnée par le langage ? Très certainement, par exemple, prenez l'utilisation du mot "classe" dans le discours politique néo-zélandais, il est rarement mentionné, et quand il l'est, il est généralement suivi du mot " moyenne ". Ainsi, lorsque The Listener a fait un article sur la "classe" en Nouvelle-Zélande, ses recherches ont montré que la plupart des Néo-Zélandais (83%) se considèrent comme faisant partie de la "classe moyenne" (Black, 2005). Les postmodernes soutiendraient-ils que cette idée d'une Nouvelle-Zélande avec une minuscule classe ouvrière et une minuscule classe dirigeante et un énorme gonflement au milieu est simplement une perception, une "vérité" subjective au mieux ? Ils le feraient probablement, mais feraient-ils remarquer que la notion de "classe", dans sa véritable signification, est la distinction entre ceux qui possèdent les moyens de production, de distribution et d'échange (la classe dirigeante) et ceux qui travaillent pour eux (les classes laborieuses), et feraient-ils remarquer qu'une classe particulière a intérêt à ce que les gens perçoivent notre société comme la plupart des personnes interrogées par The Listener l'ont fait ? (nous ne sommes tous qu'une grande classe moyenne !) Malheureusement, la réponse est non. Pour les postmodernes, l'idée même de classe sociale est simplement l'une des nombreuses vérités qui ne sont pas vraies - après tout, tout est subjectif, n'est-ce pas ? Cette même idée est courante dans la pensée postmoderniste du monde entier. Ainsi, l'historien britannique David Cannadine affirme qu'au XVIIIe siècle, "il n'y avait pas de "classe"", en partie parce que "Karl Marx n'était pas vivant et présent pour leur dire qui ils étaient et ce qu'ils faisaient" (Cannadine, 1998, p. 24) !

    Conséquences de la négation de la classe.

    C'est ici que l'œuvre de Jameson devient plus qu'un simple livre à lire pour pouvoir dire des choses comme "écoute, ne me parle même pas de postmodernisme avant d'avoir lu Jameson" la prochaine fois que tu traînes avec les intellectuels du café, parce qu'il souligne les implications politiques de cette façon de penser ; "Ce ne sont pas de simples questions théoriques ; elles ont des conséquences politiques pratiques urgentes, comme le montre le sentiment conventionnel des sujets du Premier Monde qu'existentiellement (ou "empiriquement") ils habitent vraiment une "société postindustrielle" d'où la production traditionnelle a disparu et dans laquelle les classes sociales du type classique n'existent plus - une croyance qui a des effets immédiats sur la praxis politique " (Jameson, 1991, p. 53 )

    L'expression "société postindustrielle" semble être appréciée par les postmodernes (l'industrie est tellement, euh, moderne), mais il s'agit d'un terme impropre, le monde d'aujourd'hui est plus industrialisé que jamais, grâce à la croissance rapide et à la prolifération des ateliers clandestins du tiers monde au cours des trois dernières décennies environ. Considérer que notre société (au niveau mondial) est "postindustrielle" est incroyablement occidentalo-centré. Même dans les sociétés occidentales, l'économie de services ne rend pas les classes sociales sans importance. Le travailleur du fast-food travaille toujours pour créer de la richesse pour les propriétaires des chaînes de restaurants et ne pourrait pas survivre sans vendre sa force de travail sur un marché du travail. Sans oublier que l'industrie de la restauration rapide s'est construite sur les idées tayloristes de l'efficacité de la chaîne de production, et que même la notion d'"industrie" en Occident n'est pas non plus dénuée de pertinence [...]

    Le postmodernisme ne signifie pas que les classes sociales n'existent pas, il signifie simplement que nous prétendons tous qu'elles n'existent plus. De plus, l'idéologie même du postmodernisme rend stérile toute lutte contre la domination croissante du capitalisme sur nos vies. Pour illustrer ce que j'entends par là, l'éminente journaliste anticapitaliste Naomi Klein, écrivant sur l'influence du marketing des entreprises dans les universités, a déclaré que la plupart des universitaires étaient "préoccupés par leur propre prise de conscience postmoderne que la vérité elle-même est une construction. Cette prise de conscience a rendu intellectuellement intenable pour de nombreux universitaires la participation à un débat politique qui aurait "privilégié" un modèle d'apprentissage (public) par rapport à un autre (d'entreprise)." (Klein, 2000, p.116).

    Le canular de Sokal.

    Les critiques du postmodernisme viennent aussi des sciences ; en 1996, le physicien Alan Sokal, "troublé par un déclin apparent des normes de rigueur intellectuelle dans certaines enceintes des sciences humaines universitaires américaines", a décidé de tenter une expérience : Une revue nord-américaine d'études culturelles de premier plan (dont le comité de rédaction comprenait, ironiquement, Fredric Jameson) publierait-elle un article "généreusement saupoudré de non-sens" ? À sa grande surprise, la réponse fut positive.

    Son article "Transgressing the Boundaries : Toward a Transformative Hermeneutics of Quantum Gravity" (Transgresser les frontières : vers une herméneutique transformative de la gravité quantique) déclarait "sans la moindre preuve ni le moindre argument, que "la 'réalité' physique [notez les guillemets] ... est au fond une construction sociale et linguistique"" (Sokal, 1996). En écrivant sur son canular, il posait la question rhétorique suivante : "Est-ce que les études culturelles considèrent désormais comme un dogme qu'il n'existe pas de monde extérieur ?" et invitait "quiconque croit que les lois de la physique sont de simples conventions sociales... à essayer de transgresser ces conventions depuis les fenêtres de mon appartement". (ibid).

    Pourquoi Sokal a-t-il tenté de publier son article absurde ? Eh bien, ses critiques du postmodernisme sont similaires à celles que j'ai déjà exposées et valent la peine d'être citées longuement ; "ma préoccupation concernant la propagation de la pensée subjectiviste est à la fois intellectuelle et politique. Intellectuellement, le problème avec de telles doctrines est qu'elles sont fausses (quand elles ne sont pas tout simplement dénuées de sens). Il existe un monde réel ; ses propriétés ne sont pas de simples constructions sociales ; les faits et les preuves sont importants. Quelle personne saine d'esprit pourrait prétendre le contraire ? Et pourtant, une grande partie de la théorisation académique contemporaine consiste précisément en des tentatives d'estomper ces vérités évidentes - l'absurdité totale de tout cela étant dissimulée par un langage obscur et prétentieux." (ibid)

    Bien qu'il existe de nombreux universitaires brillants dans le monde qui mettent leurs talents au service de la société, la domination de l'élitisme intellectuel (et de l'absurdité pure et simple) que Chomsky, Klein et Sokal ont mentionné est très préoccupante. Chomsky a écrit dans sa critique du postmodernisme : "Les intellectuels de gauche qui, il y a 60 ans, auraient enseigné dans les écoles de la classe ouvrière, écrit des livres comme Les mathématiques pour les millions"(qui a rendu les mathématiques intelligibles à des millions de personnes), participé à des organisations populaires et pris la parole en leur faveur, etc, sont désormais largement désengagés de ces activités ; on ne leur trouve plus, semble-t-il, lorsque surgit un besoin évident et croissant et même une attente explicite de vulgarisation de la connaissance qui permettraient aux gens ordinaires de résoudre leurs problèmes." (Chomsky, 1995).

    Je m'inquiète pour ma génération, ceux d'entre nous qui sont aujourd'hui étudiants dans les universités néo-zélandaises et qui vont devenir la prochaine génération d'intellectuels, alors que nous sommes une génération qui a grandi dans les années de l'après Reagan-Thatcher ; une génération que l'on a dressé à veiller à ses intérêts individuels étroitement compris, à se considérer comme des consommateurs plutôt que comme des travailleurs, et à qui l'on a promis des emplois dans la merveilleuse "économie de la connaissance" postindustrielle. Le postmodernisme nous apprend à ignorer la réalité dans laquelle nous vivons et, en se dissimulant sous un langage obscur et prétentieux, il crée un fossé entre les intellectuels et la masse mondiale des travailleurs. C'est une façon de penser qui semble presque faite pour s'adapter à la situation politique de notre époque. Lorsque l'on examine la manière dont on nous apprend à penser dans notre société capitaliste moderne (ou postmoderne ?), il est important de se demander quels sont les intérêts favorisés par notre façon de penser."
    -Byron Clark, "Une critique marxiste du postmodernisme", 25 août 2008: https://fightback.org.nz/2008/08/25/a-marxist-critique-of-postmodernism/



    _________________
    « La question n’est pas de constater que les gens vivent plus ou moins pauvrement, mais toujours d’une manière qui leur échappe. »
    -Guy Debord, Critique de la séparation (1961).

    « Rien de grand ne s’est jamais accompli dans le monde sans passion. »
    -Hegel, La Raison dans l'Histoire.


      La date/heure actuelle est Ven 3 Déc - 12:56